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Driving Detroit: The Quest for Respect in the Motor City (Metropolitan Portraits) Hardcover – August 8, 2012


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Product Details

  • Series: Metropolitan Portraits
  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press (August 8, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 081224429X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0812244298
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.3 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,153,860 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"An insightful history of Detroit from its accidental birth to its tortured present."—Planning



"An immensely readable and personal book. Underlying [Galster's] fine analysis of how the city went from arsenal of democracy and engine of America's manufacturing might to its current state of terrible decay is a deep knowledge of its streets, its music, its history, and its people."—Urban Affairs



"Driving Detroit is replete with interesting insights on the social history of one of America's most troubled cities. George Galster has done a remarkable job of revealing how powerful elements in the Detroit metropolitan area created over time intense race and class polarization and a pronounced city-suburban dichotomy. There are lessons to be learned from this compelling study of a dysfunctional metropolitan region. Indeed, Galster's illuminating analysis is a must-read."—William Julius Wilson, Harvard University



"George Galster cares deeply about Detroit—as should we all. In this clever and highly readable book, he draws upon history, social science, music, poetry and art to build a compelling case that bitter, unresolved conflicts have trapped the region in a zero-sum game, undermining the well-being of its people and communities—past, present, and future. Although Detroit is unique in many respects, the conflicts that bedevil it are not. There's a lot to learn here for anyone who cares about 21st-century urban America."—Margery Austin Turner, The Urban Institute



"Like a good documentary, Driving Detroit expertly guides us through a fascinating yet grim and sad urban reality while exposing the deeper historical impact of economic restructuring, enduring racism, and selfish politics. And yet the insights connected to this extreme case are not confined only to Detroit. This book should be compulsory reading for urbanists in the U.S. and beyond who are searching for adequate responses to the challenges of their own cities."—Sako Musterd, University of Amsterdam

About the Author

George Galster is Clarence Hilberry Professor of Urban Affairs in the Department of Urban Studies and Planning at Wayne State University in Detroit.

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By William Braun jr on December 4, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Driving Detroit is a marvelous social and economic history of Motown enriched by the author's personal touch. Though not so sweet a tale, to be sure, this story is engaging both in its sweeping perspectives and its specific details. To my mind the book provides a large, contemporary illustration of the old "tragedy of the commons" concept. Collective irrationality, resulting in a raft of truly disastrous consequences, can only be overcome by a measure of genuine concern for the common good. Without preaching this timely book encourages us toward the wisdom of caring about a metropolis as a whole despite profound divisions within it. I am glad and grateful for an opportunity to ponder, while cruising the pages of Driving Detroit, the quest for respect in the motor city.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
It is an unusual book in social science in that while it gives the facts, it does so with feeling and at times with poetry. It is both very informative and gripping reading.
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By James H. Booth on September 3, 2013
Format: Hardcover
A strong analysis that gives depth to the topic. The author uses an analysis of the game musical chairs with more and newer chairs being added to the game (metro area), but those new chairs (houses/apartments) are in the suburbs. So with more chairs than players, the oldest, most expensive to maintain get left vacant and bad things happen. The author doesn't use the musical chair analogy for the 1920-50's when jobs provided more workers than houses and the search for housing was severe, but the analogy would work there also. Many useful concepts are introduced by the author. Not as breezy as some discussions but much more depth.

jbooth
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