Qty:1
  • List Price: $32.95
  • Save: $7.50 (23%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Driving Technical Change has been added to your Cart
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: A copy that has been read, but remains in clean condition. All pages are intact, and the cover is intact (including dust cover, if applicable). The spine may show signs of wear. Pages can include limited notes and highlighting, and the copy can include "From the library of" labels. Goodwill Industries of Middle Tennessee - Our business is changing lives.
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Driving Technical Change Paperback – November 30, 2010

16 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-1934356609 ISBN-10: 1934356603 Edition: 1st

Buy New
Price: $25.45
42 New from $17.22 27 Used from $4.95
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$25.45
$17.22 $4.95
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Amazon Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Amazon Educational Video Store
Amazon Educational Video Store
From Adobe to Microsoft and web design to photography, learn new skills in the Amazon's Educational Video Store. Explore More.
$25.45 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Driving Technical Change + Lean from the Trenches: Managing Large-Scale Projects with Kanban
Price for both: $54.13

Buy the selected items together

Editorial Reviews

Review

"At its core, Driving Technical Change is a fantastic book about design patterns. In it, Terrence Ryan clearly outlines common, problematic personalities—“skeptics”—and provides proven solutions for bringing about progressive change. It is certainly an unfortunate fact of human behavior that people are oftentimes resistant to implementing best practices; however, using Terry’s book as a guide, you will now be able to identify why people push back against change and what you can do to remain successful in the face of adversity."

—Ben Nadel, Chief Software Engineer, Epicenter Consulting

"Politics is one of the most challenging and underestimated subjects in the field of technology. Terrence Ryan has tackled this problem courageously and with a methodical approach. His book can help you understand many types of resistance (both rational and irrational) and make a strategy for getting people on board with your technology vision."

—Bill Karwin, Author of "SQL Antipatterns: Avoiding the Pitfalls of Database Programming"

About the Author

Terrence Ryan currently works as an Evangelist for Adobe Systems. He focuses on the promotion of ColdFusion, Flash, Flex and AIR. As an evangelist his job is to encourage people to try new tools and techniques. Before that, he spent ten years in higher education overseeing the work of a team of developers, running code reviews, pushing standards, and trying to convince co-workers to come around to new tools and techniques.

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Shop the new tech.book(store)
New! Introducing the tech.book(store), a hub for Software Developers and Architects, Networking Administrators, TPMs, and other technology professionals to find highly-rated and highly-relevant career resources. Shop books on programming and big data, or read this week's blog posts by authors and thought-leaders in the tech industry. > Shop now

Product Details

  • Paperback: 200 pages
  • Publisher: Pragmatic Bookshelf; 1 edition (November 30, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1934356603
  • ISBN-13: 978-1934356609
  • Product Dimensions: 7.5 x 0.5 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,028,303 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Terrence Ryan currently works as a Flash Platform Evangelist for Adobe Systems. As an evangelist his job is to encourage people to try new tools and techniques. Before that, he spent ten years in higher education overseeing the work of a team of developers, running code reviews, pushing standards, and trying to convince co-workers to come around to new tools and techniques.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Bas Vodde on December 13, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Driving Technical Change is about exactly that. If you have an idea, a new tool or technique then how to you convince others that it is actually a good idea. What are the techniques you could use to convince the 'skeptics'.

This book consist of three parts (ignoring the introduction section in the beginning). The first part defines types of stereotypical resisters. The second part defines techniques to convince them and the third provides a strategy on how to use these techniques.

The first part defines seven types of stereotypical resisters: the uninformed, the herd, the burned, the cynic, the time crunched, the boss and the irrational. The author uses these stereotypes as extremes which he then can explain the techniques with. I personally was very uncomfortable with these seven stereotypes and didn't think of them as useful thinking tools. Grouping people in boxes like this is incredibly counter productive.

The second part defines techniques to use to convince 'skeptics'. Most the the techniques were fairly obvious, such as deliver the message or find synergy. I liked the fact that the author focused a lot on solving the right problem rather than selling what you believe in and that the author focused on gaining expertise first. It makes the techniques less like silver bullet tools that will solve all your problems.

The last part was about strategy. It describes how to first convince people who are ready and not to waste your effort on people who are not ready. I think this is sound advise. However, in the end the author suggested that it was a good idea to convince management to enforce a policy. I regret that there is still such a command & control traditional management aspect in the book.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Emily Christiansen on December 2, 2010
Format: Paperback
This book employs a conversational tone and very positive attitude to help developers sell their teammates on new technology. Terry defines the common patterns of skeptics and gives a brief description. He is also quick to emphasize that you must treat your skeptic with respect. They're not automatically bad people because they disagree with you. Then Terry launches into the different types of strategies you can use, and which skeptics they work on. Don't be fooled by the book's small size. There is a lot of great advice and it is a fun book to read. You could get through it in a weekend and go into work on Monday ready to counter skeptics with the facts in a polite and positive manner.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By R. Hilton on July 26, 2011
Format: Paperback
This book is about a problem techies encounter regularly: I want us to use a specific tool or technique at work, and I need to figure out how to get my team to buy-in. As a book on that topic, it succeeds quite well.

First, a disclaimer: I have a lot of experience in this area, as I worked somewhat recently with a team that was resistant to a lot of changes. I, along with a small handful of other members, repeatedly tried to get buy-in on tools and techniques. Occasionally, we were met with success, but more often we were met with failure.

This book made a LOT of sense of what happened at that company. After reading it, I have a much better understanding of why we failed and succeeded when we did, and what we could have done differently.

Driving Technical Change is a patterns book. Rather than design or architecture patterns, it contains people patterns. The author, Terrence Ryan, argues that most people who are resistant to change fall into one of seven patterns of skepticism. Each pattern is different, and must be dealt with in different ways. As with design patterns, a lot of the patterns are just common sense, but because Ryan gives a very specific name to each pattern, it is useful as a shared vocabulary among forward-thinking techies. It's not immediately obvious from the titles of the patterns exactly what they all mean, so it's helpful to read the book; when I looked at just the titles of the chapters I couldn't decide what one particular co-worker was, but after reading the book I completely knew.

The rest of the book is devoted to different strategies, and which ones are effective against which skeptic patterns. This portion of the book is also useful, though occasionally it feels a bit padded due to structure.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By K. McCABE on November 18, 2010
Format: Paperback
We have all been in a situation where we have found the best thing since slice bread. How do you get this over to other members of your team? Do you force it, by just convincing your boss and having it as a mandate past down, or do you get colleague buy in?

Of course the correct way is selling it to your colleagues, but of course there are different types of people to conquer and Terry groups these into the seven groups of skeptics:

* The Uninformed
* The Herd
* The Cynic
* The Burned
* The Time Crunched
* The Boss
* The Irrational

Terry covers each of this with their own chapter and gives you tips on how to spot them. Once they have been introduced, you will, as I did, start to think of people you currently work with or people you have worked with in the past and put them into these groupings.

Terry talks through nine techniques, on how to counter these groups of skeptics. Each technique counters a few of the groups, so you need to decide which technique you will need to use to over come them:

* Gain Expertise
* Deliver Your Message
* Demonstrate Your Technique
* Create Trust
* Propose Compromise
* Get Publicity
* Focus on Synergy
* Build a Bridge
* Create Something Compelling

Each of the techniques has a nice little introduction with tips on how to perform them, and why they work. He also indicates which of the groups of sceptics that the technique counters and any pitfalls you might encounter.

Terry's last section of the book covers some strategies on putting these techniques to use and getting to your end game plan.

All in all, the entire book is a great for anyone who is always looking to improve the process where they work, and always seem to hit a break wall. Reading the book won't make this happen over night but will certainly arm you with some good ideas how to get the ball rolling.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
Driving Technical Change
This item: Driving Technical Change
Price: $25.45
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?