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Drohobycz, Drohobycz and Other Stories : True Tales from the Holocaust and Life After Paperback – October 29, 2002


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin (Non-Classics) (October 29, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0142001651
  • ISBN-13: 978-0142001653
  • Product Dimensions: 7.7 x 5.1 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,191,008 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Language Notes

Text: English (translation)
Original Language: Polish

About the Author

Henryk Grynberg is the author of twenty-five works of fiction, poetry, essays, and drama, and has been the recipient of many Polish literary prizes. After surviving the Holocaust, he sought refuge in the United States because of Poland's anti-Semitic campaign and censorship of his writing.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
An interesting and rather different collection of stories about the suffering of people at the hands of both Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union. Most, but not all, of the narrators are Jewish, and I think they're all Polish.

What makes the stories original is that Grynberg devotes considerable attention to his characters' postwar experiences. So many Holocaust books, both fiction and non-fiction, end at liberation or have just a short epilogue, and sometimes you get this "and they lived happily ever after" sense. But in fact the survivors of the carnage were all severely traumatized, and those in the USSR and eastern Europe had to deal with additional suffering and repression.

This book wouldn't be for everyone, and it took me awhile to finish, but it was certainly worth reading.
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