A Drop of Chinese Blood (Inspector O Novels) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$20.64
  • List Price: $24.99
  • Save: $4.35 (17%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 1 left in stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Want it Tuesday, April 22? Order within and choose One-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

A Drop of Chinese Blood Hardcover – November 13, 2012


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover, November 13, 2012
$20.64
$2.48 $0.01

Frequently Bought Together

A Drop of Chinese Blood + Hidden Moon: An Inspector O Novel + Bamboo and Blood: An Inspector O Novel
Price for all three: $37.62

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Big Spring Books
Editors' Picks in Spring Releases
Ready for some fresh reads? Browse our picks for Big Spring Books to please all kinds of readers.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Minotaur Books; 1st edition (November 13, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312550634
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312550639
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.9 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #287,879 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

*Starred Review* Church’s previous novels featuring North Korean cop Inspector O showcased the endemic paranoia and dysfunction that is bedrock in the most secretive nation on earth. In The Man with the Baltic Stare (2010), O is “retired” by his government and banished to a mountain-top, only to be called back into service. This time, the guileful and cantankerous O has had to flee his country. He’s living with his nephew Bing in a backwater region of northeast China that borders North Korea. Bing is head of state security for the region, and his skill at controlling corruption at the border is all that allows him to keep his job. But a visit by Madam Fang, “the most beautiful woman in the world,” draws Bing and O into a bizarre quest for an almost unknowable objective, a quest that becomes increasingly more mysterious and hazardous. Bing, who narrates the story, is weighed down by the same obstacles O always faced: misinformation and disinformation about his assignment. As the story progresses, assorted Chinese, Mongol, and Kazakh agents, all maddeningly inscrutable, sow further confusion, making this the most convoluted investigation O has ever faced. The Man with the Baltic Stare was reported to be the final book in the series. Here’s hoping Inspector O has merely been transplanted to a new locale and will continue to appear in further adventures. He’s one of a kind. --Thomas Gaughan

Review

Praise for A Drop of Chinese Blood:

"Stellar... An intricate plot that ranks as one of Church's best... A satirical look at paranoid intelligence structures and the snappy, irreverent narration add to the fun." –Publishers Weekly, starred review

Praise for James Church and the Inspector O series

"Church uses his years of intelligence work to excellent advantage… delivering one duplicitous plot twist after another." - The Washington Post

“Satisfied readers will hail Church as the equal of le Carré.” –Publishers Weekly, starred review

 

"Like Marlowe and Spade before him, Inspector O navigates the shadows and, every now and then, finds truth in the half-light."--The Wall Street Journal

 

“Weaving headlines with his own knowledge of the back story of North Korea, Mr. Church is getting better and better at his new tradecraft.” --Washington Times

 

"Church creates an utterly convincing, internally consistent world of the absurd where orders mean the opposite of what they say and paperwork routinely gets routed to oblivion." --The Boston Globe


“Church illuminates the darkness of North Korea's closed society in this fascinating series.” --Rocky Mountain News


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Ripple on November 27, 2012
Format: Hardcover
Set on the Chinese border with North Korea and in Mongolia, James Church's "A Drop of Chinese Blood" offers a complex crime mystery of lies and deception, although for much of the book it's not entirely clear what the crime is. I was drawn to the book by the author's background. James Church is a pseudonym for an American former intelligence officer whose working life was spent in North Korea and the surrounding area, so he undoubtedly knows his subject. His previous books have featured the North Korean Inspector O, and while he gets another outing here, this time he has moved beyond Korea to China to have O residing with his chief of Chinese Ministry of State Security nephew, Major Bing.

There is plenty to admire in the book. There are shades of both Sam Marlowe and Hercule Poirot in the relationship between Bing and O, with plenty of pithy, wry observations and comments and the lack of trust between China, North and South Korea and Mongolia is well illustrated. However, while it's possible that if you have read and enjoyed the previous Inspector O series that you may like this book more than I did, I found the balance between the roles of Bing and O difficult to relate to and their conversations appeared to me to be less than naturalistic. Without having read the previous books however, to me it seemed that while Church has "given" this book to Major Bing, Inspector O is still struggling to let go and Bing isn't able to exert enough influence on the narrative to surpass his charismatic house guest.

What also got in the way of my enjoyment of this book is my personal gripe over crime fiction where the reader has next to no chance of working out anything that is going on until a final reveal that presents information that the reader could not possibly have deduced.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Stephen B. Wickman on December 17, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Brilliant book, especially for those who know, like I do, this part of China. Church has really found his voice with this one, second only to "Bamboo and Blood" in depth and quality.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By D.E. on May 7, 2013
Format: Hardcover
James Church creates very atmospheric books based in N.Korea and now China. The original plot device- a police investigation in a country which is perhaps the world's most repressive police state- North Korea- is very clever and compelling. All of his books, including this newest novel, suffer from two flaws which prevent the books from receiving more than three stars: 1)The characters almost all (if not all) have the same voice- a sort of streetwise, chip on your shoulder voice with the same endless string of simple one ,or two line barbs as retorts for any question or statement from another character, and this becomes somewhat annoying at times 2)the plots are too convoluted- as another reviewer has noted the reader could never untangle the mystery from the information provided or even come close, and this removes a certain... complete plausibility from the stories.
Atmospherically the novels all work very well- a sort of Police State Noir where nothing is ever as it seems but is actually usually worse. For all its State sponsored paranoia North Korea has organized crime in its ports and rail yards and espionage operations conducted by china and Mongolia. There is a brooding presence "off-screen" , especially in the scenes which take place in North Korea. You can feel it as you read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Edward Lane Jr. on May 2, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
One of the reasons I've liked Church's other books is because of the North Korean atmosphere depicted (whether its accurate, I don't know). This has less of that depiction since it takes place primarily in China.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mark Pastin on January 9, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I am a big fan of James Church's books set in North Korea, an region into which he has unique insight. All of his books up until this one are told from the perspective of his charming character, Inspector O, a sort of outcast of the North Korean police. I have enjoyed each and every one of these starting with the brilliant A Corpse in the Koryo. Sometimes when you see the books in a series getting closer and closer together, you get a bit worried. Is the author just grinding out. This was such a time.

First, this book is told from the perspective of Inspector O's nephew who displays absolutely no individual character other than as Inspector O's lick spittle. Inspector O has evolved into a sort of Charlie Chan character with one fortune cookie gem of wisdom after another. On top of this, essentially nothing happens in the book which is choked with unending dialogue leading no where. I A Corpse in the Koryo (Inspector O Novels)really struggled to finish this one.

All of which is a shame. If you want to read a great mystery, read anything else written by James Church who is wickedly good at the top of his game. Unfortunately, he is wickedly bad at the bottom of his game.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Inspector O and his nephew are dry sense of humor guys, actually, with their double entendres, petty arguments, and situations that they encounter and the other characters who come along. Also, gives me a bit of knowledge about the Korean and Chinese culture and thinking. I always enjoy Church's Inspector O books.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Search
ARRAY(0xa5f2284c)

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?