Dropping Ashes on the Buddha and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $15.95
  • Save: $2.82 (18%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 6 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Dropping Ashes on the Bud... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Clean Text. edge pages w/sign of dust. covers show wear/light dust. Your Order will Ship Directly by Amazon, Thank You!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Dropping Ashes on the Buddha: The Teachings of Zen Master Seung Sahn Paperback – February 18, 1994


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$13.13
$5.26 $3.00

Frequently Bought Together

Dropping Ashes on the Buddha: The Teachings of Zen Master Seung Sahn + The Compass of Zen (Shambhala Dragon Editions) + Only Don't Know: Selected Teaching Letters of Zen Master Seung Sahn
Price for all three: $51.39

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 232 pages
  • Publisher: Grove Press; Reissue edition (February 18, 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0802130526
  • ISBN-13: 978-0802130525
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 5.4 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (40 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #66,462 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
32
4 star
6
3 star
2
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 40 customer reviews
I love Zen master Seung Sahn's Zen teachings.
Gambit
It was one of the first books I read on Zen and it had a huge impact on me when I read it much like "Zen Flesh, Zen Bones" did.
Damon Navas-Howard
It is very profound and warm hearted in its message.
Christian Smucker

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

32 of 34 people found the following review helpful By John S. Ryan on December 21, 2001
Format: Paperback
This early book of Stephen Mitchell's is still one of his best. Not only that, but in my own opinion (for whatever _that's_ worth) it belongs on a shortlist of genuinely helpful books on Zen -- next to Kapleau's _Three Pillars of Zen_, Reps's _Zen Flesh, Zen Bones_, Suzuki's _Zen Mind, Beginner's Mind_, and a very few others.
Seung Sahn is a hoot, and Mitchell does a wonderful job presenting his teachings (in 99 fairly short sections, mostly taken from Seung Sahn's Dharma talks and personal correspondence). This book will annoy you in all the right places.
For guidance on koans generally, I like Thomas Cleary's _No Barrier_, recently republished as _Unlocking the Zen Koan_.
(And as other readers have noted, you shouldn't buy this book for advice on sitting, because there isn't any in it.)
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
23 of 26 people found the following review helpful By John E. Chadwick on November 7, 2003
Format: Paperback
The first time I read this book I was stunned. I knew, I just knew, that it made sense somehow. But for the life of me, I could not figure out the "leaping logic" of ZMSS. However, I have kept it by my bedside for almost 5 years now, and a couple times a week, I pick it up, open to a story at random and again enjoy the wisdom contained within it. And believe it or not, after many years of this, I find that the stories all fit together.
This book is the perfect companion to "The Compass of Zen". (Also by ZMSS) Instead of theory, it presents various conversations and letters from the 1970's between the Zen master and his students. On more than one occasion I have found myself nodding in agreement with his students as they question and answer. Only to learn a new lesson from the master.
Now that ZMSS is no longer here in the flesh teaching us, this book is even more important, as the Zen master will be beside us always. Teaching, correcting and guiding. A must have for the serious student of Zen.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Damon Navas-Howard on October 16, 2003
Format: Paperback
"Dropping Ashes on The Buddha" by Zen Master Seung Sahn is a truly unique gem in the boundless sea of Zen literature. It was one of the first books I read on Zen and it had a huge impact on me when I read it much like "Zen Flesh, Zen Bones" did. Like "Zen Flesh, Zen Bones" this book is filled to the brim with humor and compassion and wisdom, defying all logic that will truly awaken you. Seung Sahn was the first teacher to bring Korean Zen Buddhism to America and has since founded his own school. The book was compiled and edited by a student named Stephen Mitchell(whose translation of the "Tao Te Ching" I highly recommend.) The book is a collection of lectures, stories, letters, and stories(both modern and old) all by or having to do with Seung Sahn. It was also great to hear some great Zen stories from the Korean tradition and also a little bit about its lineage. Like koans and other Zen stories, this book shows a great account of buddha nature in action that is beyond words and thinking. Seung Sahn helped erase alot of misconceptions I had in my mind about Zen. I highly recommend this book. I am always re-reading certain stories every now and then and still finding them as fresh as the day I first read them.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 14, 1999
Format: Paperback
After reading this book about a year ago, I finally made the decision to really find out what all this zen stuff was all about. Though as someone "philosophically inclined" it took me some time to wrap my self around his "just don't know" and the like. But never for a moment was I anything but totally engrossed by his presentation. And he's funny too! What more could you want?!? A Stand-up Zen master...exactly what I've been waiting for! For a more complete presentation, check out Seung Sahn's "The Compass of Zen".
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Austin D. Hunt on March 15, 2000
Format: Paperback
I finally read this book in its entirety recently after a year of randomly reading the charming stories and koans comprising the book. I love the simplicity of Seung Sahn's teachings. The love he has for his student (you) truly shines through when reading. However, there are other books I would recommend to the beginner who knows little of Zen before this one -introductory books, otherwise the "methods" of zen teaching are easy misunderstood.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 17 people found the following review helpful By D. Townsell on July 22, 2010
Format: Paperback
Thirty years ago, I met this Korean guy in a 3-day retreat. I was intimidated because well, that is what you do with a zen master. Also, all the Boulder Colorado types I hung out with non-verbally sent out the signal-he is great and you are small. Fear creates stupidity. So we all did the zazen(sitting meditation) thing eight hours a day, 40 minutes per session, times 2, times 6, equals 480 minutes= 8 hours. It sounds intimidating- but it was broken up into 6 pieces. Those of you who paint, who work on cars, etc. will find this not impossible. It seems unimaginable, to write of it. Seung sahn, the zen master, would attend various parts of this retreat during the day and give talks, answer questions, and crack jokes. He loved to crack jokes. He had the "official title" of Zen Master-complete with the "Zen Shillelagh"-a stick which denoted rank I suppose. He could work a room. He was direct but not authoritarian. I loved the guy. Unlike perceptions of strict Japanese zen practice, you could change your zazen(sitting) position if it got too painful. He was a "real Zen Master" who didn't thwack you like a dumb beast. Just a calm and real guy. He kept saying:"Only keep don't know mind". "Keep praxing(practicing)praxing praxing"-"Your don't know mind becomes strongo(stronger) strongo strongo". After presenting me various kong-ans(koans in Japanese) he said: "Your don't know mind is very weak". Perhaps he meant "non-yammering, non-critical carping mind-or non-"yenta" mind. Non-complaining mind.
I do know that when I count my breaths running on the treadmill-it all seems so easy--easier.
This book is a collection of dialogues between Seung Sahn and students, over the years. It is a faint reflection of what I experienced 30 years ago.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews