Drowning Pool

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Formed: 1999 (15 years ago)


Biography

At this point, absolutely nothing can stop Drowning Pool. The platinum-selling Texas quartet continues to roll forward fearlessly on their fifth full-length album and third for Eleven Seven Music. Their patent arena-ready, fist-pumping hard rock remains intact even as they welcome new singer Jasen Moreno into the fold. Make no mistake about it. This is Drowning Pool at their most focused, fiery, and fierce.

Upon the end of 2011, the three original members—C.J. Pierce [Guitar], Stevie Benton [Bass], and Mike Luce [Drums]—decided to release their third singer, Ryan McCombs. Instead of folding ... Read more

At this point, absolutely nothing can stop Drowning Pool. The platinum-selling Texas quartet continues to roll forward fearlessly on their fifth full-length album and third for Eleven Seven Music. Their patent arena-ready, fist-pumping hard rock remains intact even as they welcome new singer Jasen Moreno into the fold. Make no mistake about it. This is Drowning Pool at their most focused, fiery, and fierce.

Upon the end of 2011, the three original members—C.J. Pierce [Guitar], Stevie Benton [Bass], and Mike Luce [Drums]—decided to release their third singer, Ryan McCombs. Instead of folding up and simply going away as many artists would, they dusted themselves off and began searching for his replacement immediately. It didn't matter what anyone said or thought. Drowning Pool would continue making records and playing shows. They had already survived the tragic passing of founding vocalist Dave Williams in 2002 and parting ways with his successor in 2005. The music still beckoned them to forge ahead.

"This business is a marathon not a sprint," says Benton. "You're going to have a lot of ups and downs. That's how life is. There are no more surprises because we've survived all of these disasters already. We're more of a unit than ever before. We've become adept at rolling with the punches, and we've always got each other's backs."

"Giving up has never been an option for us," affirms Pierce. "It's frustrating we have to go through the singer switch, but that's the hand we were dealt. Mike, Stevie, and I have been friends for 20 years, and we love writing, recording and playing music together. Why would we stop now? After we parted ways with Ryan, I jumped on the guitar and started writing songs again as soon as I could. A handful of them reflect the frustration we experienced, and a handful of other songs are about moving on to better times."

Those better times began when Moreno sent an audition tape to the band. Even though they'd known him for over a decade and toured with his band Suicide Hook, he humbly and unassumingly contacted them as numerous other singers did.

For the vocalist, the opportunity to simply try out for one of his favorite bands was an honor enough. "I just tried my best," remembers Moreno. "Back in the day, there was a clear moment when I knew these guys had something special. My band was opening for them at an outdoor festival. They had this wall of sound and thunderous energy so I turned around and looked at the stage. Dave had this shovel, and he was banging it on the stage as hard as he could in time with the snare drum. It was awesome visually and you could feel it. I'll never forget that. I kept moments like that in mind going into this."

After "putting him through the ringer", as Pierce puts it, Moreno nailed the audition. His range and talent also enabled the outfit to perform songs such as "Told You So" and "Follow" from 2001's Sinner, which haven't been performed live since the death of Williams.

"He's really a singer for the fans," continues Pierce. "We haven't had this kind of advantage in a long time. He's got the widest vocal range of anyone we've worked with, but he's also got his own sound. We actually had to go back and learn some of the songs he suggested to us. We have more freedom now to do whatever we want."

Benton elaborates, "It's exciting to have new blood. He's on fire about being a part of this, and that's contagious. It's like we can't stop writing songs now. Jason lives and breathes it. We can play any song we've ever written and he can sing it like the day it came off the record."

However, the new music packs the biggest punch. In early 2012, they retreated to "House of Loud" studios in New Jersey to record with Kato Khandwala again. The producer also helmed their 2010 self-titled effort, which spawned their highest-charting radio hit to date, "Feel Like I Do." Everything was amped up for the new album though.

The heavier moments hit harder, while the melodic moments are even more poignant. From the double bass drum stomp at the beginning of "Anytime Anyplace" to the razor sharp riffing of "Die For Nothing," which Pierce likens to "A super heavy 2012 version of 'Tear Away'," Drowning Pool bare their teeth.

"I feel like this record goes back to the band's roots," comments Luce. "Even before Dave joined the band, C.J., Stevie, and I used to just step into a room, jam, and see what happened. Jasen does that with us now. He brings a lot to the band, and it's three-dimensional now. This album is faster and heavier than Sinner, but it's equally melodic. After a decade, we know what we can deliver."

In a career earmarked by radio hits such as "Bodies" and "Step Up," first single “One Finger and a Fist” offers what might be the band’s most aggressive track to date. Fittingly, the band debuted the song during WWE’s Slammy Awards in 2012 before offering a free download to fans for 48 hours.

Benton describes “One Finger and a Fist” as, "A song about feeling backed into a corner. It's about that moment when you realize that you have no choice but to give the middle finger to the world and come out swinging."

“’Saturday Night’ is a raucous, rowdy, and rousing headbanger about touring life,” Moreno reveals. “It's about living your life in the moment, going for it, and not worrying about the future. You can't overthink it. You've just got to do it."

Drowning Pool continue to deliver on record, on stage, and beyond. They've toured Kuwait, Iraq, Korea, and Guantanamo Bay, performing for the soldiers. They championed the Lane Evans Health Act, emphasizing the best health care for veterans, even introducing then Senator Obama to the bill at Capitol Hill. Obama pushed it in the Senate, and it became codified as law for returning heroes. They've kicked asses on high-profile tours such as Crüe Fest and OZZfest, sharing bills with everyone from Mötley Crüe and Papa Roach to Ozzy Osbourne and System of a Down. At radio they continue to get even stronger, "Feel Like I Do" reached #2 on the active rock radio chart, giving them their greatest success yet, even besting "37 Stitches" which landed at #5.

Ultimately, this new album isn't a new beginning or an end. It's a continuation of the Drowning Pool legacy—and a fitting one at that.

"In the immortal words of Dimebag Darrell, we're trying to 'Keep on keepin' on'," concludes Luce. "Drowning Pool is alive and kicking and in some respects more than ever. We're lifers."

"Drowning Pool is still Drowning Pool," assures Moreno. "Even though there's a new element involved, I'm not here to change anything. I have tremendous respect for the guys and the fans. This band will always be Drowning Pool."

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

At this point, absolutely nothing can stop Drowning Pool. The platinum-selling Texas quartet continues to roll forward fearlessly on their fifth full-length album and third for Eleven Seven Music. Their patent arena-ready, fist-pumping hard rock remains intact even as they welcome new singer Jasen Moreno into the fold. Make no mistake about it. This is Drowning Pool at their most focused, fiery, and fierce.

Upon the end of 2011, the three original members—C.J. Pierce [Guitar], Stevie Benton [Bass], and Mike Luce [Drums]—decided to release their third singer, Ryan McCombs. Instead of folding up and simply going away as many artists would, they dusted themselves off and began searching for his replacement immediately. It didn't matter what anyone said or thought. Drowning Pool would continue making records and playing shows. They had already survived the tragic passing of founding vocalist Dave Williams in 2002 and parting ways with his successor in 2005. The music still beckoned them to forge ahead.

"This business is a marathon not a sprint," says Benton. "You're going to have a lot of ups and downs. That's how life is. There are no more surprises because we've survived all of these disasters already. We're more of a unit than ever before. We've become adept at rolling with the punches, and we've always got each other's backs."

"Giving up has never been an option for us," affirms Pierce. "It's frustrating we have to go through the singer switch, but that's the hand we were dealt. Mike, Stevie, and I have been friends for 20 years, and we love writing, recording and playing music together. Why would we stop now? After we parted ways with Ryan, I jumped on the guitar and started writing songs again as soon as I could. A handful of them reflect the frustration we experienced, and a handful of other songs are about moving on to better times."

Those better times began when Moreno sent an audition tape to the band. Even though they'd known him for over a decade and toured with his band Suicide Hook, he humbly and unassumingly contacted them as numerous other singers did.

For the vocalist, the opportunity to simply try out for one of his favorite bands was an honor enough. "I just tried my best," remembers Moreno. "Back in the day, there was a clear moment when I knew these guys had something special. My band was opening for them at an outdoor festival. They had this wall of sound and thunderous energy so I turned around and looked at the stage. Dave had this shovel, and he was banging it on the stage as hard as he could in time with the snare drum. It was awesome visually and you could feel it. I'll never forget that. I kept moments like that in mind going into this."

After "putting him through the ringer", as Pierce puts it, Moreno nailed the audition. His range and talent also enabled the outfit to perform songs such as "Told You So" and "Follow" from 2001's Sinner, which haven't been performed live since the death of Williams.

"He's really a singer for the fans," continues Pierce. "We haven't had this kind of advantage in a long time. He's got the widest vocal range of anyone we've worked with, but he's also got his own sound. We actually had to go back and learn some of the songs he suggested to us. We have more freedom now to do whatever we want."

Benton elaborates, "It's exciting to have new blood. He's on fire about being a part of this, and that's contagious. It's like we can't stop writing songs now. Jason lives and breathes it. We can play any song we've ever written and he can sing it like the day it came off the record."

However, the new music packs the biggest punch. In early 2012, they retreated to "House of Loud" studios in New Jersey to record with Kato Khandwala again. The producer also helmed their 2010 self-titled effort, which spawned their highest-charting radio hit to date, "Feel Like I Do." Everything was amped up for the new album though.

The heavier moments hit harder, while the melodic moments are even more poignant. From the double bass drum stomp at the beginning of "Anytime Anyplace" to the razor sharp riffing of "Die For Nothing," which Pierce likens to "A super heavy 2012 version of 'Tear Away'," Drowning Pool bare their teeth.

"I feel like this record goes back to the band's roots," comments Luce. "Even before Dave joined the band, C.J., Stevie, and I used to just step into a room, jam, and see what happened. Jasen does that with us now. He brings a lot to the band, and it's three-dimensional now. This album is faster and heavier than Sinner, but it's equally melodic. After a decade, we know what we can deliver."

In a career earmarked by radio hits such as "Bodies" and "Step Up," first single “One Finger and a Fist” offers what might be the band’s most aggressive track to date. Fittingly, the band debuted the song during WWE’s Slammy Awards in 2012 before offering a free download to fans for 48 hours.

Benton describes “One Finger and a Fist” as, "A song about feeling backed into a corner. It's about that moment when you realize that you have no choice but to give the middle finger to the world and come out swinging."

“’Saturday Night’ is a raucous, rowdy, and rousing headbanger about touring life,” Moreno reveals. “It's about living your life in the moment, going for it, and not worrying about the future. You can't overthink it. You've just got to do it."

Drowning Pool continue to deliver on record, on stage, and beyond. They've toured Kuwait, Iraq, Korea, and Guantanamo Bay, performing for the soldiers. They championed the Lane Evans Health Act, emphasizing the best health care for veterans, even introducing then Senator Obama to the bill at Capitol Hill. Obama pushed it in the Senate, and it became codified as law for returning heroes. They've kicked asses on high-profile tours such as Crüe Fest and OZZfest, sharing bills with everyone from Mötley Crüe and Papa Roach to Ozzy Osbourne and System of a Down. At radio they continue to get even stronger, "Feel Like I Do" reached #2 on the active rock radio chart, giving them their greatest success yet, even besting "37 Stitches" which landed at #5.

Ultimately, this new album isn't a new beginning or an end. It's a continuation of the Drowning Pool legacy—and a fitting one at that.

"In the immortal words of Dimebag Darrell, we're trying to 'Keep on keepin' on'," concludes Luce. "Drowning Pool is alive and kicking and in some respects more than ever. We're lifers."

"Drowning Pool is still Drowning Pool," assures Moreno. "Even though there's a new element involved, I'm not here to change anything. I have tremendous respect for the guys and the fans. This band will always be Drowning Pool."

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

At this point, absolutely nothing can stop Drowning Pool. The platinum-selling Texas quartet continues to roll forward fearlessly on their fifth full-length album and third for Eleven Seven Music. Their patent arena-ready, fist-pumping hard rock remains intact even as they welcome new singer Jasen Moreno into the fold. Make no mistake about it. This is Drowning Pool at their most focused, fiery, and fierce.

Upon the end of 2011, the three original members—C.J. Pierce [Guitar], Stevie Benton [Bass], and Mike Luce [Drums]—decided to release their third singer, Ryan McCombs. Instead of folding up and simply going away as many artists would, they dusted themselves off and began searching for his replacement immediately. It didn't matter what anyone said or thought. Drowning Pool would continue making records and playing shows. They had already survived the tragic passing of founding vocalist Dave Williams in 2002 and parting ways with his successor in 2005. The music still beckoned them to forge ahead.

"This business is a marathon not a sprint," says Benton. "You're going to have a lot of ups and downs. That's how life is. There are no more surprises because we've survived all of these disasters already. We're more of a unit than ever before. We've become adept at rolling with the punches, and we've always got each other's backs."

"Giving up has never been an option for us," affirms Pierce. "It's frustrating we have to go through the singer switch, but that's the hand we were dealt. Mike, Stevie, and I have been friends for 20 years, and we love writing, recording and playing music together. Why would we stop now? After we parted ways with Ryan, I jumped on the guitar and started writing songs again as soon as I could. A handful of them reflect the frustration we experienced, and a handful of other songs are about moving on to better times."

Those better times began when Moreno sent an audition tape to the band. Even though they'd known him for over a decade and toured with his band Suicide Hook, he humbly and unassumingly contacted them as numerous other singers did.

For the vocalist, the opportunity to simply try out for one of his favorite bands was an honor enough. "I just tried my best," remembers Moreno. "Back in the day, there was a clear moment when I knew these guys had something special. My band was opening for them at an outdoor festival. They had this wall of sound and thunderous energy so I turned around and looked at the stage. Dave had this shovel, and he was banging it on the stage as hard as he could in time with the snare drum. It was awesome visually and you could feel it. I'll never forget that. I kept moments like that in mind going into this."

After "putting him through the ringer", as Pierce puts it, Moreno nailed the audition. His range and talent also enabled the outfit to perform songs such as "Told You So" and "Follow" from 2001's Sinner, which haven't been performed live since the death of Williams.

"He's really a singer for the fans," continues Pierce. "We haven't had this kind of advantage in a long time. He's got the widest vocal range of anyone we've worked with, but he's also got his own sound. We actually had to go back and learn some of the songs he suggested to us. We have more freedom now to do whatever we want."

Benton elaborates, "It's exciting to have new blood. He's on fire about being a part of this, and that's contagious. It's like we can't stop writing songs now. Jason lives and breathes it. We can play any song we've ever written and he can sing it like the day it came off the record."

However, the new music packs the biggest punch. In early 2012, they retreated to "House of Loud" studios in New Jersey to record with Kato Khandwala again. The producer also helmed their 2010 self-titled effort, which spawned their highest-charting radio hit to date, "Feel Like I Do." Everything was amped up for the new album though.

The heavier moments hit harder, while the melodic moments are even more poignant. From the double bass drum stomp at the beginning of "Anytime Anyplace" to the razor sharp riffing of "Die For Nothing," which Pierce likens to "A super heavy 2012 version of 'Tear Away'," Drowning Pool bare their teeth.

"I feel like this record goes back to the band's roots," comments Luce. "Even before Dave joined the band, C.J., Stevie, and I used to just step into a room, jam, and see what happened. Jasen does that with us now. He brings a lot to the band, and it's three-dimensional now. This album is faster and heavier than Sinner, but it's equally melodic. After a decade, we know what we can deliver."

In a career earmarked by radio hits such as "Bodies" and "Step Up," first single “One Finger and a Fist” offers what might be the band’s most aggressive track to date. Fittingly, the band debuted the song during WWE’s Slammy Awards in 2012 before offering a free download to fans for 48 hours.

Benton describes “One Finger and a Fist” as, "A song about feeling backed into a corner. It's about that moment when you realize that you have no choice but to give the middle finger to the world and come out swinging."

“’Saturday Night’ is a raucous, rowdy, and rousing headbanger about touring life,” Moreno reveals. “It's about living your life in the moment, going for it, and not worrying about the future. You can't overthink it. You've just got to do it."

Drowning Pool continue to deliver on record, on stage, and beyond. They've toured Kuwait, Iraq, Korea, and Guantanamo Bay, performing for the soldiers. They championed the Lane Evans Health Act, emphasizing the best health care for veterans, even introducing then Senator Obama to the bill at Capitol Hill. Obama pushed it in the Senate, and it became codified as law for returning heroes. They've kicked asses on high-profile tours such as Crüe Fest and OZZfest, sharing bills with everyone from Mötley Crüe and Papa Roach to Ozzy Osbourne and System of a Down. At radio they continue to get even stronger, "Feel Like I Do" reached #2 on the active rock radio chart, giving them their greatest success yet, even besting "37 Stitches" which landed at #5.

Ultimately, this new album isn't a new beginning or an end. It's a continuation of the Drowning Pool legacy—and a fitting one at that.

"In the immortal words of Dimebag Darrell, we're trying to 'Keep on keepin' on'," concludes Luce. "Drowning Pool is alive and kicking and in some respects more than ever. We're lifers."

"Drowning Pool is still Drowning Pool," assures Moreno. "Even though there's a new element involved, I'm not here to change anything. I have tremendous respect for the guys and the fans. This band will always be Drowning Pool."

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

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