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67 of 68 people found the following review helpful
on May 2, 2011
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
I saw this book on television and decided to order it. I was struggling with some horrendous health problems and doctors were confused and unable to stop the pain. One medication, led to another, then another and they were still looking at adding more. Upon the books arrival, I immediately looked up my medications and there it was...the begnning of my relief. I began to immediately supplement what one medication had robbed from my body and even was able to get off the medication. I had been struggling with debilitating migraines and headaches for months and the relief was immediate. My pain levels went from a 10 to a 5 within days and are now down to 2's and 3's on a regular basis. I also began working with a doctor who specializes in "Integrated Medicine" and is more than willing to help me with the dosages of needed supplements, etc.

It is my hope to be completely pain free one day soon and this book gives me much needed information to help bring my body to a state of wholeness and healing.
Thank you for writing this book ~ it was a Godsend and an answer to prayer for me!!!
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63 of 64 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon March 6, 2011
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
This is a very good book which I will refer to frequently. It covers a large amount of synthetic drugs and their possible interactions with supplements and nutrients in your system. Certain synthetic drugs will deplete these nutrients in the body, so sometimes you'll need to add more than the usual dosage.

I personally like the chapters on the Vitamins and trace minerals. The Selenium chapter is a good read although I would have added to this chapter that Selenium is important for conversion of T4 to T3. These are thyroid hormones needed for the proper functioning of your thyroid gland. All in all, it's a good purchase and I'd buy one for your parents or anyone else who needs an up to date look at drugs and vitamins.
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29 of 29 people found the following review helpful
on May 31, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
The idea for this book is excellent. Cutting down the number of drugs you take is the best idea, but minimising some of the harm of the drugs you do still take just makes sense.

The book starts off by explaining that synthetic chemicals cure nothing and can leave you sicker as they deplete nutrients or make certain nutrients unusable by the body.

There are sections on most of the B vitamins as well as some of the minerals and other vitamins. They were quite detailed and made for interesting reading. A bit of information was included about the best forms of each nutrient which was good, and some brand recommendations were given for each nutrient. More sections including all the B vitamins and the minerals would have made the book a lot better and more complete. The dosages given seemed reasonable for most things and weren't those silly and out of date `2 mg of thiamine' type ones you still get in some recent books.

Newer concepts like the need for activated folate if you have an MTHFR polymorphism were included but in some parts they could have been a bit clearer. The information about how to test for MTHFR seemed out of date as the test is not expensive anymore. Synthetic folic acid is also recommended throughout the book which is no good if you have MTHFR and considering that many have MTHFR issues and do not know it is not ideal. Some good information about the benefits of activated folate was included however, even if it was quite basic. (I just heard a great interview with the author and Dr Ben Lynch, so I assume this issue will be fixed in future books!)

Some sections were a bit unclear on the details. In the CoQ10 section the benefits of ubiquinol (reduced CoQ10) over ubiquinone (CoQ10) were mentioned but then the dosage recommendations given didn't specify which type was being discussed. Later on the author mentions that 50 mg ubiquinol is the equivalent of 100 mg of ubiquinone which is helpful, although the 2x figure is quite different to others I have read (e.g. between 3 and 4x by cardiologist Dr Sinatra.) But even knowing that it's still not clear which form was referred to in the given dosages.

The term folic acid is used interchangeably with 5-MTHF at times and this is incorrect. To say that vitamin C causes kidney stones is also incorrect. Tofu is listed as a source of vitamin B12 but actually B12 experts say that plant foods such as tofu in fact contain B12 analogues which do not give the body any of the B12 it needs and also block the absorption of B12 from other sources. They mimic B12 in some ways but the body can't use them as B12. These foods should actually be avoided if B12 is low.

There is a bit of vegetarian bias in the book which was disappointing. Soy is listed as a food that significantly lowers thyroid hormone levels yet the recommendation is not to avoid soy, but to just take more thyroid hormone. That's pretty bad advice. Soy is not a health food! (See `The Whole Soy Story' book.) Beta carotene is listed as far better and safer to take than preformed vitamin A form animal foods, despite the fact many of us convert beta carotene to vitamin A very poorly. Getting some real vitamin A in foods such as liver is not dangerous and is in fact an extremely healthy choice. Liver is the real superfood.

Agave nectar is mentioned as a safer sweetener (?) and grape seed oil is mentioned as an oil to cook with and protein powders are listed as healthy foods. The nutritional information in this book is not great and the book would have been better if it were all omitted as this seems to be not the authors speciality. Some outdated and wrong information is included.

Probably the worst part is when the author talks about how stupid and mad you'd have to be to eat a high fat diet and so get your arteries `all clogged up' dangerously. The author really needs to do some more recent reading on this topic and why the saturated fat = heart disease hypothesis is junk science. Plus on why low carb or ketogenic diets can be very healthy as well and are in no way `as bad for you' as low fat diets as the author claims. Books like Primal Body, Primal Mind and The Great Cholesterol Con and Know Your Fats and many others explain these facts well.

I most liked the bits of the book where the author talked about the more cutting edge information on the superiority of activated forms of B2, B6 and B12 as well as folate. I took lots of notes. Almost nobody discusses who needs the active forms of each nutrient and why. Few experts even recommend coenzymated vitamins - especially B2. But if you have low thyroid levels, poor digestion, low stomach acid or gut flora issues then taking your B2 in the activated form is actually a very good idea as you may convert the standard form to the active form very poorly. The Thorne products which contain activated forms of the B vitamins were listed too, which is great. More people need to know about those high quality products.

Some of the general information about why drugs wont cure you was also very good, as were the sections on why the RDI of nutrients has nothing to do with the optimum level for each person, how much nutrient needs vary per person and stage of life, and why what is important is the optimum level of a nutrient - not merely the RDI. The RDIs for most nutrients are ridiculously low.

Overall this book is an essential read for anyone taking prescription medications. Hopefully it will help people cut down on drugs a lot and also make it safer to take those few that may remain. The information is not quite comprehensive enough to be a sole source of information about supplements and nutrients but it's a very good start. Recommended reading for anyone taking prescription or OTC drugs daily. 3.5 stars.

Jodi Bassett, The Hummingbirds' Foundation for M.E. (HFME) and Health, Healing & Hummingbirds (HHH)
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24 of 24 people found the following review helpful
on January 6, 2012
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
This is a very informative book. I never thought about how prescription drugs work in the system or knew how most cause nutrient losses in our system. We go to the doctor because of this new symptom, and get another pill for it, when it could be that we are low in a certain nutrient. I've taken a stomach acid reducer for years, and often asked the doctor if it was healthy to be on one for so long. He answered there were no indications that it was not. Recently, I've seen commercials for the drug I took with the disclaimer that it may "cause calcium and magnesium deffiencies." Really? I've read this book cover to cover, and still go back to certain sections that apply to me because of prescriptions I take. I've learned a lot about nutrition and supplements. There are so many supplements out there, and quality is very important, and can be expensive. It is very confusing for a newby. I like the fact that the author lists foods that contain the nutrients, as well as supplement dosages and what to look for in a quality supplement if you feel you need the extra support. In my case I felt like I needed supplements because I had been on this med for over 10 years, and had some of the symptoms of nutrient loss. I've found alternatives for the acid reflux med. I know not everyone can or should do that, but so far it has worked for me. As the author suggests, I talked to my doctor and pharmacist about the changes before I made them in case I needed to taper off the drug gradually. The author does caution people to start low and slow if you decide to use supplements as each person is different and may have sensitivities that others do not have. In some cases, supplements work as well as a prescription drug, and you need to be monitored. She lists drug interactions, too, some of which I wasn't aware. That's why I say read thoroughly. I talked about this book so much with my friends that they are now reading it. They say they feel better informed about nutrition and meds, too.
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49 of 55 people found the following review helpful
on June 14, 2012
Format: Paperback
I expected to love this book - it is exactly the type of information that I and other people need. Unfortunately, I didn't. The book has a lot of good information - I especially like the information on drug and food interaction and how to pick a good supplement. But I think that it has some key flaws - it doesn't clearly answer some key questions that readers would have:
1. what nutrients are mugged by the drugs they are taking - I can imagine a table with the drug name and the nutrients mugged. There is a quick glance table but not a complete one.
2. If I go shop for supplements, exactly what bioavailability ingredients should I look for. That would be helpful when shopping.
3. If a drug that I'm taking is not on the list, does that mean that it doesn't mug any nutrients or that it just wasn't listed. I couldn't find that information in the book.
4. If I have certain symptoms, which drugs might I take a look at. Maybe this would be redundant but it might be nice to have a quick glance table.

Much of the book is centered around the idea of "if you are short on X, then do such and such". That is great if you know what you are deficient it. Short of testing, who does?

For question 1, the author provides a 4 page table. Four pages out of 370 pages doesn't seem the correct ratio. And many drugs weren't on the list. For example, anti-seizure medication. Some of these other drugs are mentioned in the per-nutrient pages but that means I have to scan the entire book looking for nutrients mugged by the drugs that I consume. And specific drugs are not listed in the index but there is this nice reference in the back labeled "Identify your Drug Category" - that is a very useful reference and shouldn't be hidden in the back where we readers would not know to look!

Question 2 is discussed throughout the book but it would be great to have a table to refer to when I go to the store.

An answer to question 3 would be very helpful and maybe hints as to where to look if the drug is not in the book. Or should I assume that it would be the same as other members in the category?

Question number 4 isn't addressed at all - you would have to go through the entire book looking.

So, while I am 100% in support of the information that this book provides, I think that it could have been organized differently - then it would have been a fantastic reference.
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21 of 24 people found the following review helpful
on March 14, 2011
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
A great book full of information. A must have for anyone taking prescription drugs or anyone interested in a healthy lifestyle. I was amazed after briefly scanning thru a few chapters how i felt better shortly after making some changes in my lifestyle.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on April 30, 2011
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
This book is a wealth of information about what our prescriptions do in our body, besides what they are intended to do. A must read for anyone who is taking prescriptions and doesn't realize how they are "mugging" vital nutrients and vitamins from your body.
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
on March 18, 2011
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
This book is the best. Just realizing what effect different drugs have on our bodies and how to correct the problem is so invaluable.
The book arrived in Australia in only a couple of weeks after ordering from Amazon.com. Thank you.....I will be back.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on December 24, 2012
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
A refreshing departure from the self-aggrandizing or 'vested interest' offerings that seem so wide-spread and are so off-putting. This book is the product, of both good intentions, as well as research and empirical knowledge. The Author, as a working pharmacist for over 20 years, provides the reader with trustworthy information about what the individual can do to protect themselves against the negative effects of some of the most widely prescribed pharmaceuticals. And while the reader is cautioned that not all supplements are equal in quality, and a number of possible different sources are listed, there is no attempt to 'market' any particular one.

This book is not merely a list of pharmaceuticals and what to do about them, as I initially anticipated. One needs to pay close attention to its introduction to use this book most effectively -- a certain amount of cross-referencing is required. When that is done however, it's a truly valuable addition to anyone's library -- and particularly to those who suffer from various ailments, as it also provides information about nutrients that, in some cases, may provide the same relief and preclude the need for pharmaceuticals.

My only regret about this book, (shared by the author herself) is that, due to the overwhelming numbers of pharmaceuticals on the market today, there was not room to address all of them.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on November 15, 2012
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
The publication, Drug Muggers by Suzy Cohen, is a treasure-trove of good information in many areas of health-based interest. This time my concern was on "high blood pressure." Drug Mugger's Index on the subject led me to a very good and indepth study on Calcium (and WHY) and its requirement to be taken with magnesium, vitamin K, silica and vitamin D3. This was especially of interest in my concern of calcium's calcification of the arteries. As a result, I am making the adjustments and will give my reasons why to my V.A. doctors. I learned some very relevant info on a problem with the use of my hypertension medication and calcium and more . . . to separate calcium's use with thyroid medications by 4 hours - which Suzy says is important! Learning what I have learned, I will use this publication much more often in the future. Thank you Suzy and Amazon.com.

I purchased this particular publication through Premier Book Dealers in August of 2011, an excellent dealer-asscociate of Amazon.com, my primary book seller. Just this month I have ordered 4 items (3 books and a hard-to-get video) through Amazon.com and I must say that I am very pleased with Amazon's services.
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