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Drums Between the Bells Limited Edition


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Audio CD, Limited Edition, July 5, 2011
$39.95 $46.13

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“In the early seventies I found myself preferring film soundtracks to most other types of records. What drew me to them was their sensuality and unfinished-ness - in the absence of the film they invited you, the listener, to complete them in your mind. If you hadn't even seen the film, the music remained evocative - like the lingering perfume of somebody who's just left a room ... Read more in Amazon's Brian Eno Store

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (July 5, 2011)
  • Original Release Date: 2011
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Format: Limited Edition
  • Label: Warp Records
  • ASIN: B004Y4ZL70
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #295,980 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Editorial Reviews

Brian Eno first came across the work of Rick Holland in the late 90's during the Map-Making project; a series of collaborative works between students of the Royal College, the Guildhall School of Music, the Royal Academy of Music, the Royal College of Music, the National Youth Orchestra and the English National Ballet, among others. In 2003, Brian and Rick made their first music together. The resulting work does not appear on this album. In the time since that initial session they have met infrequently to work on new compositions. In early 2011, following the release of Small Craft on a Milk Sea (Brian's debut album for Warp Records), the pair resolved to finish the project. Drums Between the Bells is the result.
This special hardcover edition of Brian Eno's Drums Between The Bells includes a second disc with instrumental versions of tracks, and a 44 page book containing an essay by Eno as well as further images.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

34 of 35 people found the following review helpful By Charles Miller on July 8, 2011
Format: Audio CD
Since the previous reviewer did such an excellent job of explaining the single CD version, these comments are confined to the 2-CD deluxe edition. If you can afford it, this is definitely the version to get.

The bonus CD contains the instrumental version of the album, sans the poetry. While the music remains the same, the titles of the tracks are different. This makes sense, as without the words it is a different album. It truly adds to the understanding of the cutting-edge content of the first disc. Additionally, the instrumental disc reveals a sound which harkens back to Eno's early works. While this sound is present on the first disc, it is not as obvious there. There have been other instrumental versions of vocal albums before, but never has the difference been as dramatic as it is here. These discs serve to dramatically demonstrate just how excellent the components are to the whole.

Furthermore, it is accompanied with an excellent, hard-slip-cased, hard-cover book. This is profusely illustrated with Eno art as well as containing all of the lyrics. Truly, it is a substantial product and worth extra money. While the first CD, even without the bonus material is 5-stars on its own, there is much to listen to on this 2-CD set (in a way, the 6-star version) and it is highly recommended over the single CD version.

One complaint: as is always the case with new Eno releases, there is a single CD Japanese edition featuring a bonus track, which, for the extra money for the deluxe edition, should have been included here as well. This Japanese-only track ("In The Future") is not located at the end of the album like an outtake, but is inserted within the rest of the material making it relevant to the whole.
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37 of 48 people found the following review helpful By song_x on July 5, 2011
Format: Audio CD
To make a long story short: "Drums Between The Bells" has the same emotional impact on me as Eno's classics from the 70s. Here comes the long story:

1 - PRIMORDIAL SLUDGE

From early on, Brian Eno has been quite sceptical about words, their meanings, their ability to distract our attention from sound. So, although having written outstanding, at times surreal lyrics for his brilliant four song albums in the seventies ("Here Come The Warm Jets", "Taking Tiger Mountain (By Strategy)", "Another Green World" (this perfect mélange of songs and purely atmospheric pieces) and "Before and After Science"), he had never added the lyrics.

Now, on this album, the poems are printed. An interesting problem for the master of Ambient Music: poems consist of a highly condensed language, everything within a poem requires careful attention, every syllable, every space between lines, every picture, every breath words take. Eno's trick: everything becomes sound; the listener decides for himself where to move, foreground, background, wordwise, soundwise. The music offers a broad spectrum: funky passages, trash jazz, exotica a la Eno, post-Kraut-electronics and drifting-spheres, soulful chamber music. Inspired stuff.

In an interview, Rick Holland told me: "Each track was approached as a unique organism, and there were nearly fifty pieces when we first sat down to finish the record. I do offer musical ideas and also extremely vague and over-reaching requests, Can you make this part sound more like primordial sludge Brian?', that kind of thing. Of course his answers tend to be, `Yes, yes I can.'."

2 - INTO THE MURKY WATER

And, yep, he can! Poems and music - a special affair!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Tyrone Rex on August 21, 2011
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
When I first got this CD, I was a bit skeptical about a spoken word poetry recording. I am such a fan of the instrumental work of ENO that, I tend to neglect the vocal works. After a few listens, I have come to think that this is one of his best works in years. I do not have the 2 cd version(yet). So my review is of the single disc.One of the talents Brian Eno has is knowing when to incorporate other talented people on his recordings.On this, he has chosen a few female speakers to read the poems.He seems to know which voice would go with the poems and his music. I will describe a few cuts to acknowledge his use of the vocalists as well as his own vocal performances.On track 2 "Glitch", Eno speaks through a vocoder. While this is an over used effect nowadays, Eno shows how well it works in the hands of a master. Track 3 "DREAMBIRDS" has an ambient piano and would not be out of place on a Harold Budd record. Track 4,"Pour it Out" has the best sounding voice. I wonder how he found such great sounding speakers. She has excellent enunciation and a softness that lends itself to his music. "Airman" ,track 7 also has a great voice too.The lady who speaks on Sound Alien is more stern, and her voice fits the turbulent drumming.
Another noteworthy feature is that some of the sounds Eno has chosen are reflective of Rick Hollands words. On Sound Alien, the line "Drums Between the Bells' (used as CD title) is spoken over bell like sounds, and drum sounds. On track 13 "Multimedia", the line "sticks click" is spoken over the sounds of clicking (sticks?). Eno has used his voice to it's best advantage. On "Dow", he almost sounds like Kraftwork, although the polyrhythm he has created is not as electronic sounding as theirs. On "Cloud",He sings in an almost trance like rhythm.
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