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Drury Lane's Last Case Mass Market Paperback – January 1, 1933


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback
  • Publisher: Avon Publications, Inc. (1933)
  • ASIN: B000HUIJEC
  • Product Dimensions: 6.8 x 4.2 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #878,931 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Michael Wischmeyer on September 1, 2003
Format: Paperback
Drury Lane's Last Case offers a fast paced conclusion to the entertaining Drury Lane stories. The plot continued to twist and turn, introducing one surprise after another. I was able to unravel some critical clues and get hints of possible solutions, but the ending came as a surprise. I enjoyed the four Drury Lane stories - The Tragedy of X, The Tragedy of Y, The Tragedy of Z, and this final mystery. I regret that the authors chose to conclude the Drury Lane series, but I can take solace in that it allowed time for more Ellery mysteries.
I have been recently reading and reviewing the early Ellery Queen stories written in the 1930s. Drury Lane's Last case exhibits elements common to that period including slang (ten spot, smackers, simoleons, green boys) supposedly spoken by the criminal underclass, rather gruff and forceful police tactics, and a chaste love affair between a modern young woman (Inspector Thumm's daughter) and her young man.
We met Patience Thumm in the The Tragedy of Z and I was a little impatient with her character in my previous Drury Lane review. I am apparently becoming a bit soft-hearted and I now find myself appreciating her contributions to the plot. I am impressed with her quick mind and deductive ability. I may need to revisit The Tragedy of Z.
The Drury Lane mysteries were written as contemporary fiction and I remained alert for cultural and technological references to the 1930s. For example, an alibi was solid as it was obviously impossible to cross the Atlantic in one day. A detectograph is apparently some forerunner of the tape recorder. We encounter rush telegrams rather than cell phones. A holograph has nothing to do with holograms; it is a written signature. The word telephone is being shortened to phone.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 11, 1998
Format: Paperback
This is the last of 4 series with Drury Lane. The case begins with an extremely COOL style, follows by mysterious incidents happening here & there. With lots of clueless complications, the plot could mislead the reader who is trying to be the 'investigator', and finally everyone (those in the plot & those who read) was like being fooled. Anyway, 'JUSTICE' could be quite an important key(word) for solving the whole case.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By O. Chew on April 16, 2003
Format: Paperback
This was the very first Queen's case I read. I picked Queen because I like to read Japanese crime/suspense books especially those written by Shizuko Natsuki. Her famous The Tragedy of W, The Tragedy of M and The Tragedy of C were influenced by Queen's The Tragedy of X, Y and Z.
The story started with a strange looking man and later extended to an uncommon book stealing event. The reader would discover that they were linked together and after three-quarters of the book, it would be clear who was the thief and why he committed such a crime. But was it the end? No. There was an unforgettable twist in the end one would remember for a while.
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