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Dubliners: Text and Criticism; Revised Edition (Critical Library, Viking) Paperback


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Product Details

  • Series: Critical Library, Viking
  • Paperback: 512 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Books; Revised edition (August 1, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140247742
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140247749
  • Product Dimensions: 7.8 x 5.1 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.3 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #185,605 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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What a great treasure I have found.
eron
Dubliners is Joyce's most accessible work, readable and enjoyable without losing any of its deeper nuances.
Brandon Mann
The valuable notes help make the understanding of the reading much easier.
Rocco Dormarunno

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

30 of 32 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 7, 1999
Format: Paperback
As Joyce's first mature work, Dubliners comes close to being a work of art. It does have its failings though, which this Viking Critical Edition helps the reader past. For instance, those unfamiliar with late 19th century Irish politics would be completely lost by a story like "Ivy Day in the Committee Room." The notations provided in the appendix, however, allow the reader to understand the references and to actually gain insight into the past.
For anyone looking for an introduction to Joyce, this edition of Dubliners is certainly the place to start. Those already familiar with his works may gain new insight by this edition. Either way, a must own.
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26 of 28 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 3, 2002
Format: Paperback
I suppose "Dubliners" as a collection of short stories is an excellent starting point for a newcomer to the literary world of James Joyce, for several reasons. The stories are written in plain English, a statement not to be under estimated, for Joyce is known for conscious, far-reaching experimentation within the English language, which ever since has inspired critics and theorists of literature, but at the same tame presented a common reader with a real challenge, ever so more overwhelming for the native speakers, not to mention those for whom English is a second, or third language. Joyce's most known works are as hard to read as they are to translate, this being the reason why "Finnegan's Wake" remains one famous book which is rarely translated, and even more seldom done so with any success whatsoever. "Dubliners" however comes nowhere close to the later-day experiments of this author, even if stories contained therein are thematically interconnected with "Ulysses". The prose is plain and captivating, often brutal, sometimes lyrical, but always dignified. Reading "Dubliners" is an adventure in itself, because if you happened to enter Joyce's world with the aforementioned volumes, you probably expected a similar experience. This book contains the very first literary attempts by this author, when although innovative in some respects, the stories fit well into the classical literary framework of the XIX century. Therefore, because of its accessibility, it's highly recommended to read "Dubliners" as your first volume by James Joyce.Read more ›
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20 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Rocco Dormarunno on July 12, 2004
Format: Paperback
When he was a young man, James Joyce abandoned his hometown of Dublin, and yet, he never wrote about any other place. He had also rejected Catholicism, and yet all his characters are dominated by it. DUBLINERS, Joyce's collection of short stories which set the standard for the genre, is filled with characters who come to terrible revelations (which he called "epiphanies") about how their lives had been scarred by the provincialism of Dublin, the divisiveness of its politics, and the oppression of religion. By extension, this is how Joyce percieved humanity at the dawn of modernism.
The stories range from the psychologically simple ("Counterparts" and "A Little Cloud") to the extraordinarily complex ("A Painful Case" and "The Dead"). But what is common throughout is the feel for Dublin just after the turn of the last century. The readers see the cobblestones, the chimneys, the trams and carts, the churches, and the street lamps. More importantly, the readers feel the tensions underlying the public smiles and infrequent bursts of confidence that the characters exhibit.
The extra value of this Viking Critical edition is, of course, the criticism. The valuable notes help make the understanding of the reading much easier. And the critical essays, each single one, provides a deeper understanding of how to put these stories in a larger frame.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Erin on January 5, 2005
Format: Paperback
The simplest of all of Joyce's works, Dubliners introduces the people and everyday life present in Dublin, Ireland. While the events can be described as quite mundane, each of the fifteen short stories subtly highlights a unique meaning in life. Though each is self-sustaining, it is much more gratifying to read the tales in the order published. They follow the natural course of human life, growing from childhood to adulthood to death. Joyce skillfully demonstrates a sequence of events that can happen to anyone throughout a lifetime.

However, if you are completely unhappy with the first stories, skip to the end and read "The Dead". There is no doubt in my mind that this is one of the best stories of fiction of its time - both in its use of language and its powerful messages. Actually a novella, this final story encompasses everything from politics to love to the inevitability of death rendering all else meaningless. While many people finish the Joyce's collection finding it to be one of the more depressing pieces of literature they have read, it really is not. For example, "The Dead" proves that death is essential to making a fresh start. Joyce did not intend to write to please others and leave them satisfied, but instead to portray reality in a grim city.

Just remember, after finishing Dubliners, you are one step closer to reading Ulysses!!
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