Customer Reviews


43 Reviews
5 star:
 (20)
4 star:
 (14)
3 star:
 (3)
2 star:
 (3)
1 star:
 (3)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


22 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I love this master/slave relationship. Totally absorbing.
Kim Dare's works is mostly on Dom/Sub relationship. I have to say Duck is her best effort to-date. This master/slave story in the avian shapeshifting world is just beautifully written. All of us know the story of the ugly duckling and Kim Dare has used this little story perfectly in Duck. I love both Ori and Raynard and I am glad that the story is written from these 2...
Published on August 28, 2010 by R.Parklane

versus
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Sad, not hot.
Summary: Über-sub cooks and cleans for his master. He learns he is a king among men, but only wishes to cook and clean some more.

This may be my tastes, or perhaps I just don't get the mindset of being a 24/7 sub. In any case, I found Ori's situation to be hard to stomach: The man had zero agency for himself and very little personality other than to abject...
Published on December 28, 2012 by Mean Jane


‹ Previous | 1 25 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

22 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I love this master/slave relationship. Totally absorbing., August 28, 2010
By 
Kim Dare's works is mostly on Dom/Sub relationship. I have to say Duck is her best effort to-date. This master/slave story in the avian shapeshifting world is just beautifully written. All of us know the story of the ugly duckling and Kim Dare has used this little story perfectly in Duck. I love both Ori and Raynard and I am glad that the story is written from these 2 men's point of view. The avian shifter world with its rung of hierarchy is refreshing, the ducks lowest in rank and the predators of course high up in status. Poor twenty year old Ori who has not completed his shapeshifting fully has been declared a duck and thus confined to the role of a lowly servant in this avian world. His job is to serve in the nest, the domain of the avian elders. He is abused and humiliated in all possible ways until he caught the eyes of a hawk. Raynard is the hawk shifter and just inherited the reins of one of the powerful avian families. Out of pity, Raynard rescues Ori and takes him in as his servant. But he is soon attracted to Ori's submissive nature and sees the needs in this clumsy young man to submit and serve in order to achieve balance in his life. Raynard becomes Ori's master, nurturing and caring for the little fledgling until Ori is ready to take his full shapeshifting. All is well in Ori's world until that fateful shapeshifting day when things drastically changed for both men after a shocking and painful revelation. The story is seamless and captivating and I could not stop once I started. I just have to know what happens next as their master/salve relationship evolves.

I love the way Kim Dare handles both men's needs, struggles and emotions. The development of the master/salve relationship is fascinating to read. I love how the dominant/submission roles play out and the growing care and love involved. Sex is kept to the right balance as emotions and characters become the focal point. Ori the sub is endearing and Raynard is the perfect alpha Dom without the abusive nature. I have to say he is one of my favorite Doms. I love how Raynard cares for his submissive fledgling. The paranormal elements certainly adds originality and freshness into this absorbing story. And I just love the ending.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


18 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Unique premise and very sweet romance, September 10, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Warning: This review might contain what some people consider SPOILERS.

Rating: 9/10

PROS:
- I love the premise of this story. It's vaguely familiar in that the novel is an interpretation of a Hans Christian Andersen fairy tale (this is evident right from the beginning), and the structure of the story is similar to the structure of werewolf stories because the main characters are half-human and half-animal. The most interesting aspect to me was how Dare gives each species of bird different characteristics and tendencies--and how the human version of each bird shows those same qualities.
- The book also explores one of my favorite romance themes: the abused, neglected man finally finding someone who cherishes and protects him. Ori is no withering flower...he isn't completely helpless before Raynard finds him, but Raynard's kindness toward him certainly allows him to flourish in a way that he couldn't before they met.
- Ori and Raynard are perfect for each other. Ori is clumsy and emotional and completely devoted to his master, and Raynard is growly and uber-protective of his submissive. Ori has a fairly dangerous accident at one point, and I loved how violently Raynard reacts to the situation. He's incredibly worried about Ori, yet he's unable to admit what that means about their relationship.
- The sex scenes are hot. Plentiful (but not TOO much so, at least not for my taste), fairly detailed, and lightly BDSM--mostly bondage, blindfolds, etc. and one scene of whipping.
- Dare's writing style is, for the most part, smooth and pleasant and easy to read quickly. Her descriptions are detailed enough to give a full picture of the story's setting without being too dense.

CONS:
- Dare has a tendency to use descriptors rather than the characters' names to indicate what each man is doing. For example: "The submissive smiled against the hawk's mouth." The author was probably trying to avoid using the characters' names too often, but after a while I felt as though I was being beat over the head with the fact that Ori is "the duckling" and "the submissive" and Raynard is "the older man" and "the hawk" and "the dominant."
- Mistakes and typos and misspellings are fairly common in this genre, especially in ebooks, but this book struck me as having more than its fair share. There are quite a few missing and/or misplaced commas and a fair number of misspelled words (some of which are rather important words within the story): "ducking" instead of "duckling," for example.

Overall comments: This story manages to convey as beautifully as any other I've read that submission is a natural part of certain people's personalities--and that they're miserable if the ability to serve is taken away from them. The angsty period in the novel isn't as long and painful as some I've read, but it's nothing to sniff at, either. There's some definite pain before the sun comes out again; however, I really, really liked the ending. It felt wonderfully happy and settled to me.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful Exploration of Total Power Exchange in a Clever World, December 3, 2010
Duck! is, hands down, one of the sweetest and most insightful explorations of 24/7 total power exchange that I have ever read. It's also one of the most highly recommended books I've ever read, and though I didn't quite understand why at the beginning, it was perfectly clear by the end.

There are a lot of amazing things about this book. First and foremost is the way the TPE relationship is handled--how it begins, how it develops, how it ends, and most especially the thought processes of both the Dom and the sub. The two POVs complimented each other to perfection in this book, soothing any--ahem--ruffled feathers the reader might ever have about their situation. Not, mind you, that I think that will come up often; Dare sets the stage with so much patience and reflection that even an uninitiated reader with no understanding of what drives Doms and subs would likely find themselves nodding their heads and saying, "Ooooh, I get it now." That's quite the accomplishment.

Another tick in the "quite the accomplishment" column was Dare's concept of avian shifters. Truly creative, and the hierarchy amongst them felt natural, borrowed neatly as it was from real life. There was some uneasiness about this in the beginning when poor Ori is still in the Nest, before he's discovered by his new master, but once he's in his master's hands, the picture of the world Dare painted becomes clear and even kind of reassuring.

So, why not five stars? Two big things. First, the writing's a little rough. Tons of misplaced commas--and not so much proofing errors as grammar errors--that often threw off the rhythm of a sentence or a scene. Also an absolutely endless use of epithets ("the younger man," "the older man," "the bigger man," "the smaller man," "the hawk," "the duckling," "the submissive," and on and on and ON), a dozen or more on the average page, sometimes two or three in a single sentence! My guess is that this stemmed from the author either worrying about repeating the characters' names too often (which is silly, names are as invisible on the page as "said"), and/or from her being unsure of how to handle pronouns in an M/M story without confusing the reader (which is admittedly not easy but still something I expect a published author to manage). One or two epithets a paragraph is usually enough to make my eye twitch, so this was pretty tough for me to get over and definitely took away from my enjoyment of the story.

The other issue was the pacing in the middle third of the book. The first third of the book had a strong hook, drew me right in, made me care intensely about Ori and his master and want to know everything I possibly could about the brilliant world Dare created. The last third was heartbreaking, sad, sweet, beautiful, engrossing . . . I seriously lack the adjectives to describe how compelling and wonderful and emotional the last third of this book was, or how satisfying the ending was. But the middle third (after Ori had settled into his master's home but before he completes his full shift) really began to drag, enough that I began to think about not finishing. If you find yourself in the same position--STICK IT OUT! The last third of the book will carry you away, keep you up half the night, and you'll be glad for every second of lost sleep because it meant you got to read act 3.

So, this one's a definite "recommend" for me--READ IT!--and I'm looking forward to picking up the next Kim Dare book in my TBR :)

Rachel Haimowitz
Counterpoint (Song of the Fallen)
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Creative and beautiful D/s romance, September 30, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I love shapeshifter romances, so when I stumbled across this while browsing for books for my new Kindle, I couldn't resist. Shifters other than wolves are still uncommon, and Avian shifters even more rare. Once I started reading, I could not put it down!

Dare has done a creative twist on the ugly duckling fairy tale. Ori was raised by humans, not knowing he was a shifter. After a partial shift, the Avian Elders determine he is probably a duck, one of the lowest ranked avian species (predators being high). He is given a job in "the nest" until he fledges. There, he is bullied by a bunch of crows until one day he is swept away by a Hawk. Raynard senses that Ori is a submissive, and they quickly establish a relationship. Raynard does not care that Ori is only a duck; he believes each species has its own strength and beauty. But, when Ori fledges and they learn he is not a duck, Raynard suddenly must face his own prejudice concerning rank. How can Ori truly be a submissive?

This romance is true D/s. Ori is a submissive to Raynard's dominant, and there is some minor punishment. However, the BDSM element is very, very light (for those readers that care). However, the sex is scorching. It's frequent enough to enjoy without consuming the entire story. Though the secondary characters are pretty one dimensional, the two main characters are fully developed. I was interested in them; I cared about them. The world-building is also top notch. The author doesn't get buried in details, but there is still plenty of description to bring her fantasy to life. Overall, this was a fantastic book that I would eagerly buy in print; and, I will positively look for more of her work. Highly recommended!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Sad, not hot., December 28, 2012
By 
Mean Jane (Waianae, Hawaii) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Duck! (Paperback)
Summary: Über-sub cooks and cleans for his master. He learns he is a king among men, but only wishes to cook and clean some more.

This may be my tastes, or perhaps I just don't get the mindset of being a 24/7 sub. In any case, I found Ori's situation to be hard to stomach: The man had zero agency for himself and very little personality other than to abject servitude. It's clear he was abused terribly, if not outright raped, prior to the start of the book. The man who takes him in does nothing and when he finds out about it, he sees it as a sign that Ori is a submissive.

I've read several BDSM stories where the sub was a vibrant personality and strong in their own right (you can be submissive and strong). This... story, and watching this boy-child (he's 21, but from his mindset you'd think he was 12. He's very simple minded, which puts another uncomfortable spin on the relationship) have no value of himself other than what his master thinks of him. I found it to be piteous and depressing.

Stopped at 67%, after his change into swan. (I don't feel that's a spoiler alert. It's an Ugly Duckling story)

Again, there's a chance this may be a matter of not fully understanding the kink. I recommend reading the sample -- the man who quietly takes the abuse in the first few pages is the same man through at least 2/3's (all I could read) of the book. He doesn't change, doesn't grow other than to latch 100% onto his master. If you find that hot, then this is the book for you.

Feel free to comment if Ori actually grows a personality and maybe I'll read on, but for now I'm bummed out. I was really hoping to like this book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


23 of 32 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Couldn't even finish the book, October 12, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This is the first Kindle book I've bought that I couldn't even bring myself to finish, although I did make it most of the way through, at least past the 'big reveal' (who didn't see that one coming?).

This book had the potential to be good, except the author tries way too hard to harp on the whole master/slave thing.

I don't really feel that I'm exaggerating when I say that I think the following words (when combined) make up about 10% of the total words used in the book: slave, master, sir, submissive.

They cropped up every other sentence or more. We get it, already! Tell a story! Instead, we're left with page after page of a whiny sub worrying about how he's never good enough and the soft hearted dom who is afraid he's falling for his sub.

Warning: Book involves boring m/m, extreme overuse of 'submissive' and related words, a big reveal we were all expecting, and vicious punishments such as writing assignments (Think grade school lines).
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A unique book about extreme submission, it worked for me., February 13, 2014
At least for me this was all about submission and the timid, vulnerable Ori. The good thing about this book was that I finished it and hardly realized it was over, the bad thing was that it was over and nothing actually happened. It was a take on the Ugly Duckling fable however and that part certainly worked for me. I was happy this story did not venture into the gruesome, which sometimes can happen in shifter stories if only to sensationalize it. The relationship between Frederick Raynard, Fred the Hawk and Ori was very well done. I loved the slow build up both characters had till they realized their true feeling for one another. I also liked that the Dom was willing to put his needs aside for the betterment of his sub but did give in in the end. All this was beautifully done, so I gave the book 4 happy stars. It worked for me.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Great Idea, Poor Execution *Spoilers*, September 16, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I thought the idea for this book was a clever take on The Ugly Duckling story as well as a clever take on shifter genre in general. However, I found all of the characters completely unlikable and one sided. Raynard is not a likable guy. He's an a**. Although he claims to love Ori, he never seems to show him any real affection or treat Ori as an equal. In fact later when Ori is revealed as a swan, the highest ranking of all birds, Raynard can hardly bring himself to address him as Ori rightfully deserves. It really shows his poor character. He is very quick to demand respect for his station but sees no need to treat Ori with the same respect. Being submissive does not make you weak or a moron. Even if the author chose to write Ori that way. He has no depth. No strength. He never stands up for himself. There is really nothing to like about him either.
As for the secondary characters....it appears the entire avian society is made up of total jerks, a**holes, and cruel souls. Who would want to be associated with any of these folks.
I'll be turning my copy.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A fantastic romance, December 2, 2011
Although BDSM usually makes me squeamish, I absolutely loved this story. The fact that it's set in an alternate universe helped. "The Ugly Duckling" is one of my favorite fairy tales and I love adaptations of the story (The Clan of the Cave Bear (Earth's Children, Book One) is a great one). I fell in love with Duck right away, and was made to feel quite warm and fuzzy by the way his master cared for him both emotionally and physically. The sad parts literally had me in tears, and the happy parts made my heart soar. The ending was beautiful. This is a MUST read!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great book but needs a thesaurus., May 6, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I liked how this book read with the exception of referring to the hawk/Dominant as "the older man" and "the younger man" being his sub. OK, I get it now let's move ON. I felt creepy at times reading about this older man sexually using the younger man. I DID enjoy the plot/story and just got book two in the series, WITH A KISS. The writer could use a good thesaurus to name her characters better.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 25 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

Duck!
Duck! by Kim Dare (Paperback - July 8, 2011)
Used & New from: $66.50
Add to wishlist See buying options
Search these reviews only
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.