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Ducky Paperback – May 24, 2004


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Ducky + 10 Little Rubber Ducks Board Book (World of Eric Carle (Harper))
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 4 and up
  • Grade Level: Preschool and up
  • Paperback: 32 pages
  • Publisher: HMH Books for Young Readers; Reprint edition (May 24, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 061843240X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0618432400
  • Product Dimensions: 10.3 x 3.7 x 0.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #690,889 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

PreSchool-Grade 2. In 1992, a large crate of bathtub toys traveling from Hong Kong to Tacoma, Washington, was lost at sea. Since then, hundreds of the toys have washed ashore, with scientists recording their positions, plotting their courses, and using the information to further their study of currents, winds, and tides. Ducky is the first-person account of one yellow plastic duck that survived the journey to fulfill his destiny in a little boy's tub. In the throes of the adventure, Ducky wishes he could do more than just float, that he could swim, or fly. But, by journey's end, safe and with a child of his own, the contented toy concludes, "How wondrous it is to be able to float!" Bunting's narrative opens with the choppy rhythms and abbreviated sentences of an easy reader, but grows more lyrical as events progress. It is a bit cloying, though. Wisniewski's intricate paper cuts seem a bit grandiose for this modest, somewhat precious text. They will engage readers, however, and they are striking in their use of color and texture, in their composition, and in their interpretation of events. A bit out of sync, then, but likely to find an audience among the bathtub set?and budding scientists as well.?Marcia Hupp, Mamaroneck Public Library, NY
Copyright 1997 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist

Ages 3^-7. A yellow plastic duck narrates the story of his adventures on the ocean after a ship's crate loaded with bathtub toys is washed overboard. Along with some of the other toys, the duck is swallowed by a shark, then spit out even though he and his companions are "guaranteed nontoxic." Gradually, the toys are separated by wind and wave, and the duck journeys alone for months. Eventually, he is picked up by a schoolboy and logged in by scientists. An author's note explains the real-life incident that gave rise to the story as well as the science connection. Wisniewski, last year's Caldecott Medal winner, uses cut paper to capture all the crash and motion of the ocean, and his effects are so vivid that children will need to touch the pages to make sure they are actually smooth. The bold illustrations and exciting action make the book a great story hour pick. Susan Dove Lempke --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Eve Bunting has written more than 200 books for children, many of which can be found in libraries around the world. Her other Clarion titles for very young readers include My Big Boy Bed, which was also illustrated by Maggie Smith, and Little Bear's Little Boat, illustrated by Nancy Carpenter. She lives in Pasadena, California.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By E. R. Bird HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on February 20, 2005
Format: Paperback
If you were a man like David Wisniewski and you had just created the emotionally and physically exhausting Caldecott winning "Golem", (a book which deals with religious persecution and the very essence of what it means to be alive), it would be more than understandable if you wanted to follow that book up with one about a small yellow bathtub toy. Which is, of course, precisely what he did. While "Golem" was a vast creative epic that utilized his particularly original cut-paper technique to its best advantage, "Ducky" is a small clever story written by fellow Caldecott winner Eve Bunting and set through the eyes of a plastic toy on the high seas. It has emotional impact, beautiful illustrations, and a true story behind its tale. Altogether it makes for a delicious picture book.

On the title page we see large wooden create being lowered onto what can only be the deck of an ocean liner. Turn the page and the ship is silhouetted against a sky, followed closely by an impending storm. Our story begins. As the duck himself says right off the bat, "I am a yellow plastic duck and I am in great danger". With the horrible storm, the crate containing Ducky and his hundred some fellow toys is released into the violent sea. The crate breaks apart and suddenly the water is filled with yellow ducks, blue turtles, green frogs, and what looks to be red beavers. The duck experiences great fear, particularly when a passing shark (rendered in its pupil-less-many-toothed glory) attempts to devour a load of toys. The duck notes that the shark does not seem too much care for getting plastic caught in its teeth, "though we are guaranteed non-toxic". Days pass and all the toys separate in the waves.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 1, 2003
Format: Paperback
We checked this one out of the library so many times I finally had to buy a copy. Excellent cut-paper illustrations, a great story, humorous text -- this is one book you won't mind reading over and over to the kiddos.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 29, 1999
Format: Paperback
I really love this book. The illustrations are bright and fun. The story is very charming and my 5 yr. old found the true story behind it very fascinating. I highly recommend it for 2 to 5 year olds.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Shanna A. Gonzalez on January 14, 2012
Format: Paperback
In 1992, a crate of 29,000 rubber bathtub toys washed overboard off a ship bound from Hong Kong to Washington, USA. Hundreds of toys have since been found in coastlands around the world, shedding light on our understanding of how currents, winds and tides interact. This book traces the story of one bathtub toy from the time its crate boards the ship until it is found by a boy in Alaska. The story draws young readers in by personifying the toy as if it is experiencing its journey as a sentient creature. Caldecott Medal Winner David Wisniewski illustrates the story in cut-paper collage, skillfully rendering the dramatic power of the ocean without being too frightening. This is an unusual story that may not appeal to every reader, but for those who prefer "real" stories or who are interested in science, it's a sure winner. It's best suited for preschoolers and early elementary readers.
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