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Dude, Where's My Country? Paperback – Bargain Price, August 1, 2004


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 249 pages
  • Publisher: Warner Books (August 1, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0446693790
  • ISBN-13: 978-0446693790
  • ASIN: B001QFY298
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 5.9 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (897 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,660,300 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

he people of the United States, according to author and filmmaker Michael Moore (Bowling for Columbine, Stupid White Men), have been hoodwinked. Tricked, he says, by Republican lawmakers and their wealthy corporate pals who use a combination of concocted bogeymen and lies to stay rich and in control. But while plenty of liberal scholars, entertainers, and pundits have made similar arguments in book form, Moore's Dude, Where's My Country? stands out for its thoroughly positive perspective. Granted, Moore is angry and has harsh words for George W. Bush and his fellow conservatives concerning the reasoning behind going to war in Iraq, the collapse of Enron and other companies, and the relationship between the Bushes, the Saudi Arabian government, and Osama bin Laden. But his book is intended to serve as a handbook for how people with liberal opinions (which is most of America, Moore contends, whether they call themselves "liberals" or not) can take back their country from the conservative forces in power. Moore uses his trademark brand of confrontational, exasperated humor skillfully as he offers a primer on how to change the worldview of one's annoying conservative blowhard brother-in-law, and he crafts a surprisingly thorough "Draft Oprah for President" movement. Refreshingly, Dude, Where's My Country? avoids being completely one-sided, offering up areas where Moore believes Republicans get it right as well as some cutting criticisms of his fellow lefties. Such allowances, brief though they may be, make one long for a political climate where the shouting polemicists on both sides would see a few more shades of gray. Dude, Where's My Country? is a little bit scattered, as Moore tries to cram opinions on Iraq, tax cuts, corporate welfare, Wesley Clark, and the Patriot Act into one slim volume--and the penchant to go for a laugh sometimes gets in the way of clear arguments. But such variety also gives the reader more Moore, providing a broader range of his bewildered, enraged, yet stalwartly upbeat point of view. --John Moe --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly

Flush from the success of Stupid White Men and an Academy Award for best documentary, Moore continues his rhetorical assault on the Bush administration. The book shares much with Al Franken's Lies besides liberal sentiment and satirical tone; not only do both authors rely on the hoary device of having God tell them He doesn't support the president, but they each claim to pack their carry-on luggage with baseballs to bean would-be hijackers. But where Franken attacks individual conservatives, Moore focuses on issues. His first chapter is a series of unsettlingly specific questions (based on rigorously footnoted facts) about the political and financial ties among Bush, the Saudi Arabian government and Osama bin Laden's family, though he leaps from the facts to speculation when he wonders whether the September 11 attacks might have been hatched within the Saudi military. Other chapters attack the public's susceptibility to what he casts as the fear-mongering tactics the administration has used to justify foreign military interventions and, he says, the erosion of domestic civil liberties, and he lays plans for a Democratic victory in 2004: in addition to a half-serious nomination of Oprah, he offers a prescient, reasoned and highly favorable evaluation of Wesley Clark as a candidate. Moore's arguments work best when delivered mostly straight, since he isn't always as funny as he seems to think he is. Straightforward propositions leavened with humor, like a guide to talking to conservative relatives, work fine, while efforts at flat-out farce ring hollow. But expect liberals to once again eagerly support one of their most prominent spokesmen by checking this out at the cash register.
Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Michael Moore is an Academy Award-winning American filmmaker, bestselling author, and liberal political commentator. He is the director and producer of Bowling for Columbine, Fahrenheit 9/11, and Sicko, three of the top five highest-grossing documentaries of all time. In September 2008, he released his first free movie on the Internet, Slacker Uprising, documenting his personal crusade to encourage more Americans to vote in presidential elections. He has also written and starred in the TV shows TV Nation and The Awful Truth. His bestselling books include Dude, Where's My Country and Mike's Election Guide 2008.Moore is a self-described liberal who has explored globalization, large corporations, gun ownership, the Iraq War, U.S. President George W. Bush and the American health care system in his written and cinematic works. In 2005 Time magazine named him one of the world's 100 most influential people. In 2005, Moore started the annual Traverse City Film Festival in Traverse City, Michigan. In 2008, he closed his Manhattan office and moved it to Traverse City, where he is working on his new film.

Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

198 of 238 people found the following review helpful By J. Roberts on October 11, 2003
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Hey folks, this is place for book reviews, not just somewhere to hammer your political stakes. If I want to know a good restaurant in which to eat, I don't get much help from people who say "that place sucks," or "it's awesome, maan." Those are not restaurant reviews. They are inarticulate blanket statements that tell me very little about culinary establishments. If some moron who doesn't like Italian food, but loves Chinese food, even if it is bad, makes those statements, I am not in a very good position to find a good restaurant.
But, hey, Moore's book is not exactly fine literature either, nor is it supposed to be. It is the stuff that touches nerves and induces one or two sentence leftwing or rightwing rants. While this may be bad for the Amazon book review section, it is good for political discourse.
And that is where many "professional" reviewers (or the publicists who pick abridged comments) fare little better than the guy who likes lousy Chinese food. The first splash review on the back of the book exclaims "Moore is a comic genius." This comment is like a court reporter exclaiming "Kobe Bryant is a basketball genius" after covering a pretrial hearing.
Well, Moore is damned funny, but the book is not primarily a comic work. Chapter 10 is hilarious, granted, but this is a book of serious political and social commentary peppered with quips and sarcasm. Moore fans already know that model, and they aren't the ones reading these reviews for the purpose of finding a good read.
The book is a Bush-bashing of epic proportions, but the weapon for the beating is not weird conspiracy theories as some might want to claim.
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152 of 186 people found the following review helpful By John H Heckenlively on October 10, 2003
Format: Hardcover
I agree with those who say that anyone accusing Moore of not writing the facts is full of it. I have spent the past two months working on an anti-Bush book, and virtually everything I found confirms what Moore says in "Dude".
There are very serious questions about what happened both before and after 9-11 that the Bush administration is refusing to answer. Frankly, I think that Moore does not go far enough in
indicting the Bush administration for their crimes.
The entire Bush family is one virtual criminal enterprise, from Prescott to the present, and it is deeply disturbing that such people have their hands ILLEGALLY on the levers of power.
Aside from being the truth, Moore as usual is very, very funny. There are some actual laugh-out-loud parts of the book.
Best reason to buy the book: Moore is going to use all the money he gets from the Bush tax cut to work against Bush and the Republican party in 2004. So help make Mike rich!
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38 of 45 people found the following review helpful By WichacpiHoskila VINE VOICE on October 17, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Moore's book was at times downright DISTURBING to me--and not in the Molly Ivans "I can't believe the astonishing facts I'm reading!" way. No, more like "I'm a bit worried that Moore has gone off the field."
I'm a Moore FAN who's met the man several times, visited with him, and read all his books (I just finished this one today; I'm one of those rare reviewers who actually READ the books before submitting a review). But this book seems to offer us a lot of what we already knew, a hefty dose of NEW research, but wrapped in the decoration of conspiracy theory.
For example, Moore excels at researching and documenting his grievances about Bush's handling of terrorism, war, the conomy, the envioronment, civil rights, etc. Moore has been taken to task before about playing loose with facts, so he covers himself well by offering us specific sources for each claim this time. At least the facts won't be as easy to dispute.
But Moore sways a bit too flexibly toward his own dastardly conspiracy theories, and that nudges him toward rhetoric that becomes ever-more aggressive and shocking, rather than cunning and witty as when he's at his best. He'll cite Michael Savage as an example of conservative hate speech that "liberalism is a mental disorder," but a few pages later joke about no effective mental health treatment being developed for conservative thinking. He'll title a book "Dude, Where's My Country?" to complain that conservatives have stolen the America he once knew, and then climax the book with a chapter about how conservatives are a minority in an America that really prefers liberal social agendas.
One chapter troubles me deeply.
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43 of 52 people found the following review helpful By Truth on October 22, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Wow, what a book! I must have looked stupid laughing out loud during my lunch breaks as I read it. But the laughter was mixed with concern about where our America is heading. His excellent, yet misunderstood use of sarcasm is well blended with the shocking, sometimes frightening and thought provoking questions he raises. I thoroughly enjoyed his previous book, but I admit I couldn't wait for this one because I knew that if he was outraged at Bush for stealing the Presidency in "Stupid White Men", he would be hilariously struck by the mess he has gotten us into in such a short time.
Now let's talk about the reviewers that "allegedly" read this book, but were "disappointed" to find those web sites that list the "factual errors" in this book. Isn't it convenient that they don't share the links to these sites so we can judge for ourselves.
So I decided to look for these myself, and I found some interesting ones. You know, I was really expecting to find at least ONE error or misrepresentation, but all they had were either inconsequential criticisms or debunking of opinions, not facts. In fact, none of the supporting articles that Moore references are even challenged!
Let me show you a few examples of the 17 "factual errors" noted at spinsanity.org:
#1. "Moore claims that [...] HarperCollins, which published Stupid White Men, "dumped [the book] in some bookstores with no advertising [...] yet on his web site Moore stated that "HarperCollins is doing their best to get the book out there." -Bryan Keefer, "Moore's myriad mistakes"
HOW IS THIS RELEVANT? Also, these were not FACTS, just opinions. Can there be "Factual Errors" in opinions?
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