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  • Duke Ellington Meets Coleman Hawkins
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Duke Ellington Meets Coleman Hawkins Original recording remastered


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Audio CD, Original recording remastered, October 24, 1995
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Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Samples
Song TitleArtist Time Price
listen  1. Limbo JazzDuke Ellington 5:15$1.29  Buy MP3 
listen  2. Mood IndigoDuke Ellington 5:56$1.29  Buy MP3 
listen  3. Ray Charles' Place (Album Version)Duke Ellington 4:05$1.29  Buy MP3 
listen  4. WanderlustDuke Ellington 5:00$1.29  Buy MP3 
listen  5. You Dirty Dog (Album Version)Duke Ellington 4:20$1.29  Buy MP3 
listen  6. Self Portrait (Of The Bean)Duke Ellington 3:53$1.29  Buy MP3 
listen  7. The Jeep Is Jumpin'Duke Ellington 4:50$1.29  Buy MP3 
listen  8. The RiciticDuke Ellington 5:53$1.29  Buy MP3 
listen  9. SolitudeDuke Ellington 5:51$0.99  Buy MP3 

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (October 24, 1995)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Original recording remastered
  • Label: Impulse!
  • ASIN: B000003N7P
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #139,480 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com

Duke Ellington and Coleman Hawkins were both involved in unusual collaborations in the early 1960s, often with much younger musicians: Ellington with Max Roach and Charles Mingus (Money Jungle) and with John Coltrane; Hawkins with Roach and Sonny Rollins. As surprising as any of those inter-generational sessions, however, is this 1962 meeting between Ellington and Hawkins, if only because it hadn't happened before. With a band of Duke's greatest veterans--alto saxophonist Johnny Hodges, baritone saxophonist Harry Carney, trombonist Lawrence Brown, and Ray Nance on trumpet and violin--it's classic small-group Ellingtonia with one essential difference. "Limbo Jazz" and "The Ricitic," pulled together for the occasion, are playful tunes with touches of lounge Latin. The latter becomes a delightful dialog focused on Nance's violin and Hawkins and Ellington's inspired accompaniment. The finest moments come with "Mood Indigo," a beautiful vehicle for Hawkins's warmly rambunctious tenor, and "Self-Portrait of the Bean," an Ellington-Strayhorn tribute that Ellington only finished in the studio on the day of recording. Rising to the special moment, Hawkins invests the ballad with extraordinary depth and grace. --Stuart Broomer

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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See all 14 customer reviews
Beautiful relaxed musicianship.
S. Evans
All the songs are Ellington compositions, so you're already benefiting from one of the most important American composers of the 20th century.
Todd E. Garland
If you are like me, and don't buy this approach to jazz, you will love this CD.
Tom W. Rhody

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

36 of 40 people found the following review helpful By Tom W. Rhody on February 3, 2001
Format: Audio CD
All too often, some jazz that is deliberately quirky, dissonant,and quasi-ugly (if not outright ridiculously annoying) is extolled over jazz that is beautiful, haunting, intricate but melodious. Philip Larkin, modern British Poet and Jazz critic, has touched upon this trend in his critical essays on jazz. Larkin makes a convincing case for how ridiculous this trend can be: gee, this stuff sounds angry, ugly, but if I listen to it twenty times and become inured to it, why then I'm a genius and so is/are the musicians. If you are like me, and don't buy this approach to jazz, you will love this CD. This CD is my favorite; it is beyond 5 stars. No, it is markedly not "awesome," it is beautiful, articulate, mellow, joyful jazz. Ray Nance should be double underlined in the Amazon review above. Why isn't there a retrospective CD of this man's work? Perhaps because the music he made with horn, violin, and voice was simply too "accessible"? My all time favorite version of "Solitude," which is my all-time favorite jazz piece is on this album with Nance playing violin as only Nance can play it. If you thought the writer James Joyce was at his best in his DUBLINERS, and found his ULYSSES to be an egregious, pretentious bit of flim-flam, you will love this CD. I never get tired of hearing the beauty and cooperative interplay among Ellington, Hawkins, and Nance on this underated masterpiece.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By NotATameLion on August 7, 2001
Format: Audio CD
Duke Ellington and Coleman Hawkins have given water to the dry riverbeds of my soul. The songs assembled together on this disc may well be some of the coolest, smoothest music that I have ever heard.
Songs like "Mood Indigo," "Self Portrait"--my favorite song on the disc, and "Solitude." Will slip their way into your heart and change it. This is the musical equivalent of a cool stream. Its current never fails to bear me away through landscapes of imagination. I can see why Thomas Merton sometimes meditated to Ellington...
On the other hand, you have some really spirited, less meditative stuff here too. Tunes like "Limbo Jazz" and "The Jeep Is Jumpin'" show off Duke and Hawk's ability to jam. There is not a weak track on this disc!
Music this wonderful and varied never fails to make me marvel at the creativity of the Lord of the Dance...
As Psalm ninety-six says: "Let the heavens be glad, and let the earth rejoice; Let the sea roar, and all it contains Let the field exult, and all that is in it. Then all the trees of the forest will sing for joy" (v. 11-12).
So it is here. I give this wonderful disc a hearty recommendation. Get a copy today.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Todd E. Garland on April 7, 2005
Format: Audio CD
If music isn't universally seen as the highest art form, we still find ourselves transported by it. The most elegiaic ballad and the catchiest pop song are able to take us to different worlds, remind us of lovers, stir us up, soothe our souls, wound, heal, and all in the span of a few minutes. And so we find ourselves reaching for image and metaphor to describe, if not explain, just what great music does to us, for us, with us.

And this is great music. All the songs are Ellington compositions, so you're already benefiting from one of the most important American composers of the 20th century. What makes this album so great, though, is the band . . .

This small combo is a band with which Ellington was very comfortable. Hawkins seamlessly weaves in his playing, although he had never before sat in with these gentlemen. The styles of playing differ in texture among these fine players, but the performances fit, rely on each other, ultimately elevate one another, because this handful of artists share a vision stemming from their pure love of music.

These are musicians and composers of such talent that their playing never seems or sounds like solo performances. I think they were all working together on the same painting, or nine separate paintings to be more precise, well eleven actually since we know sadly that there were two lost performances. But painting they were, all together on the same work. And they come up with a masterpiece of skill, soul, heart, and mind.

This is intelligent jazz, but you don't have to think about it to enjoy it. This is soulful music, but not melancholy.

When my daughter's husband, Jules, gave me this album for Christmas I eagerly anticipated hearing and enjoying two musicians I love and respect play together.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By DANIEL Mc Brearty on July 27, 2004
Format: Audio CD
The record shines, end to end. From the opening Limbo Jazz (supposedly just a warmup, you can hear Aaron Bell singing to himself in the background), through to the deep well of Solitude, the musicianship and chemistry is all there. (Consider for a moment how many years collective musical experience are on this CD - this was recorded in the early 60s.) Hawk plays as well on this as on anything he ever did - you can almost feel the mutual respect and admiration between him and Duke - and Duke's men support him with sensitivity and aplomb. Hodges in particular contributes wonderful single chorus gems on Wanderlust (a midtempo blues pinned down by Bell and Sam Woodyard) and The Jeep is Jumping, where, after further solos from Harry Carney, Lawrence Brown and Ray Nance, Hawk lays down two chorusses that make the sweat break out. He is at his harmonic and rhythmic best. Sam Woodyard steps up the pace with the snare on the second chorus.

Duke's tribute Self Portrait of the Bean is another gem, Hawk plays two wonderfully understated chorusses, low to high register, and let's the beautiful melody work through his incredible sound, while the rest of the horns wail an accompaniment.

Every track has jewels to be found - listen out for Duke's variations in approach on Wanderlust, as he keeps the simple 12 bar format from sounding repetitive from soloist to soloist. But the cream - for me - is the stellar Solitude. After a dramatic Dukish intro, Ray Nance states the theme in F major on violin. Then they move to Db for Hawk to give his version. It's some version. He adopts a style of rhythm and phrasing that is almost conversational, choosing always melodicism and subtlety over technical or harmonic trickery. This kind of playing can't be faked, or taught in school.
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