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Dumping In Dixie: Race, Class, And Environmental Quality, Third Edition Paperback – March 24, 2000


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Westview Press; Third Edition edition (March 24, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0813367921
  • ISBN-13: 978-0813367927
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 5.9 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.1 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #539,192 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Robert D. Bullard is a sociologist and long-time civil rights and environmental justice activist. He is professor of sociology at Clark Atlanta University, and also serves as director of the university’s Environmental Justice Resource Center.

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Customer Reviews

3.1 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Deb Lagutaris on July 1, 2000
Format: Paperback
Dumping in Dixie is far more complex than the title implies. The book provides a detailed history of why the ecological movement failed to resonate with many disadvantaged groups, in particular, the African-Americans in the South. Participation was co-opted in part by lack of resources, and also by economic pressures. The threat of exit was effectively used by corporations that did not want to be subjected to restrictions on polluting activities. Business leaders quashed activism on the grounds that precious jobs would be lost. It was not until the 1990's that African-Americans became more involved.
Initially, the environmental movement was populated by the more affluent white American who seemed to be more concerned with the preservation of nature and clean space for leisure activities. Other motivations were less clear, and emerged with the maturity of the movement. Bullard details this history well. The only failing I found was the end of the book that tails off into solutions that seem impractical.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By BOB on July 2, 2004
Format: Paperback
Robert Bullard, through his work Dumping in Dixie, calls to question the complex and controversial issue of environmental racism. He argues that African-Americans and minorities are being denied and stripped of a safe and healthy environment. Americans in certain areas, particularly low-income and minority families, are bearing the brunt of hazardous wastes and poisonous substances. Factories and corporations are choosing certain areas where they know that they can avoid pollution laws due to the current plight of the neighborhood. As a result, people in these low-income communities are suffering all the consequences of these corporations and receiving none of the economic benefits. Bullard emphasizes that the environmental movement did not resonate and take root in low-income communities, and therefore, there is a significant discrepancy in environmental threats and government protection between whites and minorities. Due to a lack of resources, mainly education and income, environmental racism exists in certain parts of America.
I feel as though Robert Bullard calls awareness to a very relevant and noteworthy issue in American society. Although he only uses a few small towns in his arguments, the fact that these issues exist anywhere is disturbing. Environmental justice did not resonate in disadvantaged areas, and the corporations and government are showing absolutely no regard for the people in these communities. People and places cannot be sacrificed, and something must definitely be done to prevent this obvious racism and discrimination.
In terms of his main arguments, I completely agree with Robert Bullard. He does an excellent job of raising a very significant issue. Many people do not even think about the evils of society, especially environmental racism.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By C Reza Ebrahimi on July 7, 2004
Format: Paperback
In his book Dumping in Dixie, Robert Bullard contends the issue of environment racism. His exhaustive research is neatly packed into sections which continue to awe the reader; each section being filled with facts that prove that minorities are in fact living in less environmentally safe areas. These areas are the locations that large corporations choose to have their power plants and toxic waste dumps. Bullard proves that these areas are consciously chosen by corporations and the government so that they may avoid and escape pollution laws.
Bullard, as an environmental sociologist, hit the target with this classic book. The book is a statement or a demand for the rights of people of color and poor communities to be protected. It stresses the widening health, economic, and environmental disparities which are all present moving into the 21st century. He uses as examples a few small, poor-income towns which are the location of hazardous waste. Through these few towns he explores the country's corporate hold over laws, namely pollution laws. Bullard's main stress point is that the environmental movement did not begin or grow in low-income communities thus allowing for "environmental injustice" and somehow permitting the exploitation of those who are less fortunate; those who are unable to make a voice for themselves and moreover, those who lack the education of such an issue.
I think this book is a must read because it explores an issue that very few people are knowledgeable about. Before I read this book I thought I was aware of the environmental problems surrounding this nation. However, not only was I very ignorant in that field, I also learned much more regarding environmental racism and injustice.
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By Boone on May 17, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Read this for a sociology class. Interesting material but most of sociOlgy is intriguing. The environmental racism is something you dont notice until you look around you.
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