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Dutchman Paperback – July, 1996


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Paperback, July, 1996
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Time Warner International; First Edition edition (July 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0446601519
  • ISBN-13: 978-0446601511
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 4.2 x 7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,245,453 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Nobody writes better contemporary fantasy than Richard A. Knaak." -- Robert J. Sawyer, author of The Terminal Experiment

"Reminiscent of Roger Zelanzny's and Tim Power's best work." -- Michael Stackpole, author of Once Upon A Hero --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

About the Author

Richard A. Knaak is the author of the NY Times best-seller The Legend Of Huma and other popular fantasies. His stories have been translated into several languages, most recently Polish and Russian. He resides in Arkansas and can be reached through his website at www.sff.net/people/knaak --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

More About the Author

Richard A. Knaak is the New York Times bestselling author of some three dozen novels, including the The Sin War trilogy for Diablo and the Legend of Huma for Dragonlance. He has penned the War of the Ancients trilogy, Day of the Dragon and its upcoming followup, Night of the Dragon. His other works include his own Dragonrealm series, the Minotaur Wars for Dragonlance, the Aquilonia trilogy of the Age of Conan, and the Sunwell Trilogy -- the first Warcraft manga. In addition, his novels and short stories have been published worldwide in such diverse places as China, Iceland, the Czech Republic, and Brazil.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Navah on October 6, 2002
Format: Paperback
. . . but I guess tastes change. I loved this book when I was something like 12, 13, 14, and i've had it on my shelf and remembered it fondly ever since. I kept meaning to read it, ahd it in the back of my mind as a really good book that I liked to pull off the shelf and reread one of these days.
Well, "one of these days" finally came, and I pulled it off the shelf and reread it, and y'know what? It was far from wonderful. I wouldn't go as far as to call it terrible - the fact remains, I've read worse books, far worse books, but this one's definitly up there with the bad ones.
The plot is unclear. From the start, it's unclear why the Scattered ones are scattered, why they leap - even when it's explained, later on, the explanation is weak. The motive and power and drive behind thier pursor, the Darkling, is unclear. Everything about Dutchman is unclear. And throughout the whole book you can never really get a clear grasp on whether the Scattered ones are the lucky ones, that they can live so many lives, or the cursed ones, to never get to live out one life completely, to be forced to keep moving. The explanation behind the Despair herself is weak . . . a bit of mystery in a plot is a lovely thing, even a bit that remains unresolved to the last, but at least explain properly the things you try to explain! Nothing in this book is really made clear, and as a reader and writer of fantasy, this is quite frustrating to me in a read. The surprises are unsurprising and unexciting. The characters seemed stock as well, the relationships between them one dimensional and either stagnant or too quick, developing in ways that the writer doesn't develop but rather jumps to.
The book is choppy, slow moving, amorphous, and while a clever idea, quite badly executed.
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By VanHausen on November 16, 2012
Format: Paperback
I ran across this book, and loved it. So I looked up other books by the author, and so far have found each and every one unreadably bad. So I reread this book, and still loved it.

It reminds me a bit of old Golden Age Sci Fi, particularly stories of peril to the entire universe, like maybe Edmund Hamilton, only fantasy rather that Sci Fi. The two main characters are somewhat cliche in their origins. The Villian, called The Darkling, brings to mind Emperor Palpatine, if the heroes of Star Wars were defeated long ago, and Palpatine went on to rule everything he could grasp, until he couldn't grasp anything more, and so made extreme efforts to gain more power, until it shattered his own universe. The title character is something like the proverbial genius scientist, who discovers a "new power source" that will "remake the world". His plan backfires, and destroys his universe, with unknown help from the Darkling. Then take these two familiar characters, and run time ahead several centuries of repeated destructions of whole universes, creating victims of the cataclysms who are carried along, and then drop everyone into this world. The book might be as dull as other reviewers say, except the point of view is from the aforementioned victims, who are relatable characters who speak in normal english, and have normal human motivations. The ending turns everything around for the Dutchman, leaving the villian cursed forever and defeated. And the ending also is complete, as in there really is no room for a standard sequel, any further tale would be a completely different sort of story.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Daniel O. Buterbaugh on January 3, 2001
Format: Paperback
I recommend this book. It is very well written, and maintained my interest. I have read it three times in the last two years, and I rarely read a book more than once.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 11, 1999
Format: Paperback
I read this book a few years ago and enjoyed it thoughly. This book is an excelent work of contemporary fantasy.
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