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  • Dvorák: Cello Concerto / R. Strauss: Don Quixote ~ Maisky
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Dvorák: Cello Concerto / R. Strauss: Don Quixote ~ Maisky


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Audio CD, March 9, 2004
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Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Samples
Song TitleArtist Time Price
listen  1. ApplauseAudience Applause0:18$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  2. Dvorák: Cello Concerto in B minor, Op.104 - 1. AllegroZubin Mehta14:30$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  3. Dvorák: Cello Concerto in B minor, Op.104 - 2. Adagio ma non troppoZubin Mehta10:53$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  4. Dvorák: Cello Concerto in B minor, Op.104 - 3. Finale (Allegro moderato)Zubin Mehta12:05$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  5. R. Strauss: Don Quixote, Op.35 - 1. Introduktion (Mäßiges Zeitmaß)Zubin Mehta 6:13$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  6. R. Strauss: Don Quixote, Op.35 - 2. Don Quixote, der Ritter von der traurigen GestaltZubin Mehta 1:05$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  7. R. Strauss: Don Quixote, Op.35 - 3. Sancho PanzaZubin Mehta 1:07$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  8. R. Strauss: Don Quixote, Op.35 - 4. Variation 1 (Gemächlich)Zubin Mehta 2:34$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  9. R. Strauss: Don Quixote, Op.35 - 5. Variation 2 (Kriegerisch)Zubin Mehta 1:38$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen10. R. Strauss: Don Quixote, Op.35 - 6. Variation 3 (Mäßiges Zeitmaß)Zubin Mehta 7:50$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen11. R. Strauss: Don Quixote, Op.35 - 7. Variation 4 (Etwas breiter)Zubin Mehta 2:05$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen12. R. Strauss: Don Quixote, Op.35 - 8. Variation 5 (Sehr langsam)Zubin Mehta 4:14$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen13. R. Strauss: Don Quixote, Op.35 - 9. Variation 6 (Schnell)Zubin Mehta 1:16$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen14. R. Strauss: Don Quixote, Op.35 - 10. Variation 7 (Ein wenig ruhiger als vorher)Zubin Mehta 1:13$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen15. R. Strauss: Don Quixote, Op.35 - 11. Variation 8Zubin Mehta 1:55$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen16. R. Strauss: Don Quixote, Op.35 - 12. Variation 9 (Schnell und stürmisch)Zubin Mehta 1:19$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen17. R. Strauss: Don Quixote, Op.35 - 13. Variation 10 (Viel breiter)Zubin Mehta 4:24$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen18. R. Strauss: Don Quixote, Op.35 - 14. Finale (Sehr ruhig)Zubin Mehta 5:30$0.99  Buy MP3 

Product Details

  • Performer: Tabea Zimmermann, Mischa Maisky
  • Orchestra: Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra
  • Conductor: Zubin Mehta
  • Composer: Antonin Dvorak, Richard [1] Strauss
  • Audio CD (March 9, 2004)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Deutsche Grammophon
  • ASIN: B0000CGV0M
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #501,086 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Santa Fe Listener HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on November 5, 2007
Format: Audio CD
Because of his association with Martha Argerich and his own great talents, Mischa Maisky has made dozens of high profile recordings, and with the recent passing of Rostropovich, he bids fair to be the superstar cellist one thinks of right behind Yo-Yo Ma. This pairing of the Dvorak concerto and Don Quixote came out in 2004, but it didn't turn into a high-profile release. It's easy to see why. Given the cello's limited solo repertoire with orchestra, the competition couldn't be more intense.

Even so, this is a wonderful release, in no small part because of the great Berlin players and the lavish sound from DG's engineers. I have never heard a warmer-sounding recording, and it's a joy to catch the nuances of Maisky's tone. He is a musician of touch rather htan force or charisma (compared, that is, to Rostropovich and De Pre), which is all to the good in the Dvorak. Warhorses must be revived with fresh phrasing and new insights, and Maisky brings both. Mehta offers discreet accompaniment, choosing not to go too symphonic.

Because the conductor carries much greater weight in Don Quixote, Mehta's so-so interpretation, which starts out too calm and mostly stays that way, can't stand up to Karajan or Kempe. The saving grace is the recorded soun and the Berliners, as before. But violist Tabea Zimmermann equals Maisky in musicality, so once they enter, the picture brightens. Maisky is somewhat more romantic and yielding than Ma with Maazel, but you can still tell that this is a cool, modernist reading. Here, Quixote speaks in mutters and sighs that are uncannily human. Fortunatley, the death of Quixote is played wth very touching gentleness. In all, this CD shouldn't be allowed to fall between the cracks -- it's very satisfying.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By William Patry on August 2, 2005
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I own many recordings of both pieces, includng the two other SACDs of the Dvorak (Starker and Piatigorsky), both of which are great. The Starker has an amazing quality of immediacy, you feel as if you are standing next to him. In the Miasky (a student of Piatigorsky who previously recorded the Dvorak with Bernstein), especially for the Strauss, you feel as if you are in the orchestra. The sensation is three-dimensional, the brass and woodwinds being very well-miked. Tabea Zimmerman is the faithful sidekick. They are live recordings, with Zubin mehta and the Berliners, but I couldn't find when in the generally puff-piece liner notes.

Fantastic
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Hannibal on May 23, 2012
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I have seemingly countless recordings of these two great masterpieces which I have treasured going on in some cases for more than half a century: the Don Quixote, of course led by the peerless Antonio Janigro, Fritz Reiner/CSO recording - originally simply stereo, but for some time now re-engineered as a great SACD too, another early SACD by Starker almost as good, and a recent, new one by Wispelwey and Fischer...

But now here comes these two by Mischa Maisky (performed in honor of Piatagorsky). and WOW! Maisky's recent years playing with Martha Argerich have obviously had a great effect on him - and for the good. His technique remains excellent, but he now also takes the time to notice more of what's behind the notes than he might have taken before. This pays great dividends to Dvorak's sadness and Don Quixote's madness.

I am generally not a fan (to put it mildly) of Zubin Mehta, but here he deserves great credit for leading the magnificent Berlin Philharmonic in both of these works for bringing out the full orchestral palette of color and feeling in harmony with his soloists interpretations. Bravo Zubin, a great effort.

Finally, thanks to DG for the courage to record these live performances in full DSD/SACD sound, proving once again that the finest music merits the finest recording techniques. Please continue to do so.

Buy this extra-ordinary two-fer. You will find it hard, if not impossible, to get greater value for your soul and your love of great music. This is as good as it gets!
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Format: Audio CD
Sometimes the line can be crossed between intensely personal expression and over-exertion. This live Dvorak Cto. finds Maisky attacking the first movement with too much edge. The cello is not an instrument for explosive force, and I can understand pushing it in the concert hall, but on disc the aggression was all wrong in Dvorak - I couldn't keep listening. The slow movement, however, backs up over the line. It is expressive to the point of sounding fulsome, but I was carried along by Maisky's involvement, not to mention the gorgeous accompaniment by the Berlienrs, captured in beautiful sound (with the expected exaggeration of the cello part, which jumps out of the speakers in a way that the instrument doesn't in concert). The horn chorale alone is enough to carry you into the dream world of Humperdinck's Hansel und Gretel. Mehta has always been a strong accompanist, a good ting when the orchestral part is this symphonic. The finale races ahead exuberantly and makes a grand effect. The absence of schmaltz is welcome in a work that easily becomes cloying.

I like Strauss's Don Quixote played as a symphonic tone poem rather than a quasi-cello concerto, and the more the Don feels like a quirky human being the better. There are big-deal recordings of the opposite kind, with a star cellist plastered front and center (Karajan and Rostropovich come to mind). I have been discouraged by Mehta's career after its initial glamour phase in LA, but Richard Strauss has remained consistently one of his stronger composers. He isn't as imaginative with the orchestral part as Rudolf Kempe with the same orchestra on EMI with Paul Tortelier or quite as luxurious as Karajan. But it's hard to quibble about such marvelous playing.
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