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Dvorak: Symphony No. 9; "From The New World"

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Audio CD, May 27, 2008
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Dvorak: Symphony No. 9; "From The New World" + Dvorak: Symphonies Nos. 7 and 8 + Mahler: Symphony No 1
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Editorial Reviews

Product Description

This recording by the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and Music Director Marin Alsop is the first of three discs of DvořAk symphonies taken from live performances at Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall. The most popular of all DvořAk' works, Symphony No

Review

"The New World Symphony is for me, above all, a journey -- Dvorak's journey to America, getting to know its people. But more importantly, it's Dvorak's own spiritual and emotional journey: from his intense longing for his beloved Bohemia to the thrill of the "new world" and its varied peoples, to thoughts of going home." - Marin Alsop -- NPR.org, April 19, 2008, Scott Simon

Musical America's Conductor of the Year, 2008 -- Musical America, December 2008

Recorded live in Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall in Baltimore, Alsop's Ninth is robust and energetic, with muscular rhythms and stalwart tempos. Her Molto vivace Scherzo has real heft and weight and her closing Allegro con fuoco has drive and strength. Better yet, Alsop coaxes warm, characterful playing from the Baltimore musicians. Their ensemble is tight and direct in the fast movements, but their playing is colorful and soulful in the slow movements. Their burnished lower strings in the opening Adagio and their solemn trombones at the start of the central Largo are deeply felt and quietly affecting. Preceded by a brilliant and bumptious account of the same composer's Symphonic Variations, this disc will add luster to both Alsop and the Baltimore's reputation. -- AllMusic.com, James Leonard, June 2008


Product Details

  • Orchestra: Baltimore Symphony Orchestra
  • Conductor: Alsop
  • Composer: Dvorak
  • Audio CD (May 27, 2008)
  • SPARS Code: DDD
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Naxos
  • ASIN: B0017PE9L8
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #77,336 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Leslie Richford on February 16, 2009
Format: Audio CD
Antonin Dvorak (1841 - 1904): Symphonic Variations, Op. 78; Symphony No. 9 "from the New World", Op. 95. Performed by the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, dir. Marin Alsop. Recorded at the Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall in Baltimore, Maryland, from 8th to 10th and 14th to 17th June, 2007. Published in 2008 as Naxos 8.570714. Total playing time: 64'44".

Thank heavens that, as an early music fan, I have nothing to do with all the petty squabbling and jealousies which seem to surround certain classical music artists. I have just been listening to this CD on good stereo equipment (see my profile; I find it ridiculous that people actually write reviews after just hearing this on the radio or after downloading it, presumably in some low-quality compressed format.) What I heard was a beautifully crafted, warm and light, only occasionally idiosyncratic version of Dvorak's "New World", played by first-class musicians and captured, by Naxos standards at any rate, in superb stereo sound which reveals all the detail in a natural and very pleasing acoustic. The thundering brass of the last movement came over really well, the English horn of the Largo was evocatively played, the rhythms and the dialogue between the sets of strings and woodwinds were all not merely audible but also revelatory. The Largo was taken at a fairly relaxed pace, made up for by what I take to be some rather odd tempo variations in the Molto Vivace (although I am judging this from previous hearings of other performances, I don't own a score). But generally I would say that this is a recording of which Naxos can be proud and which may well prove to win many for classical music, which is what it's all about, I guess. Very pleasing indeed!
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12 of 15 people found the following review helpful By William A. Christian on June 28, 2008
Format: Audio CD
I just downloaded this and wanted to see what others were saying about this recording and discovered a single star. Sorry but this is a very decent recording of an old chestnut. It is worth more than a single star. I can't count how many time I have heard this piece played on recordings over 40 years. Alsop's interpretation is a good one and the recording is decently priced. I really do not think that anybody can claim to the greatest recording of this piece since most of the recordings of this are older. I also find that there is a good controlled emotional aspect to this recording. I realy do believe that this recording deserves a listen and the Naxos price is always good.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Christopher Henrici on June 26, 2013
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
...While playing the CD, I had to keep telling myself that- it's the BSO, or more like- I can't believe this is the BSO. I like the BSO but even a partial person probably realizes the orchestras weaknesses. I never thought they had a lot of flair, and the brass/wind section in particular sometimes showed itself to be "second tier". Marin Alsop has done a fine job of shoring things up. I remember reading in the local papers like The Post and The Sun about all the snootiness and controversy that took place upon the selection of Alsop as the BSO's primary conductor some years ago. Listening to this disc, it sounds like they made the right choice. This Naxos recording of the often performed and recorded Dvorak "From the new world" Symphony 9 is evenhanded yet dramatic. As a fan of the BSO and Myerhoff Symphony Hall (where it was recorded) this Alsop cycle is a real treat (which includes Dvorak symphonies 6-9, and are even offered in the bluray audio format too). The recorded sound has a huge dynamic range and accurately reflects the warm and natural acoustic of the Myerhoff hall (which I have been to many times). Classical music lovers probably have their "go to" version for this Dvorak symphony, and listening to different versions directly you really get a taste of the flavors any given conductor brings to the score. Some conductors tend to emphasize the beats and percussive aspects, at the expense of some graceful beauty. Others do the opposite and wind up sounding staid; the better versions balance both aspects very well. I feel Alsop's BSO take of this symphony does a totally respectable job on that count, she achieves a nice sense of proportion. This is easily the best recording of the BSO I have ever heard.Read more ›
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Jurgen Lawrenz on November 15, 2011
Format: Audio CD
The conductor's name was just a name to me until this recording came into my collection, more or less from mere curiosity.
Usually I'm suspicious of "No name" conductors, and usually the result confirms it. I have 40-odd readings of this work, of which probably half would not be missed if they burnt to a cinder. Accordingly I had a pleasant surprise on auditioning this album.
There is a splendid brio to it, an ample sense of forward drive, without the kind of exaggeration that Szell favoured. Rhythms are nicely profiled, climaxes well judged and executed, and the orchestra play really well. The balance with the brass section is also more than adequate. No qualms on that score. The first movement, despite its unnecessary acceleration on the last page is an undoubted success. Better readings than this don't come by the dozen, I assure you.
The slow movement is also finely crafted; I like especially the subtle way the basses fade in and out: they are a presence, but not too obtrusive or abrupt as is often the case. This is being so, I feel that the reeds should also have attacked the first notes of their tunes in this manner, but to change a wind players habits might require the authority of a big ego conductor!?
The scherzo is a slight downside. Strangely, the rhythms, although snappily placed, seem the wrong kind here; this is after the manner of Dvorak's slavonic dances and their sharp etching leaves us with rigorously "symphonic" rather than "folksy" feeling - similar to the way that Beethoven turned the Menuet into a scherzo; but this is precisely not the Beethovenian type of scherzo.
The last movement redeems matters again. In fact it is probably the best movement of the recording, and therefore leaves us with a good feeling when it all ends.
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Dvorak: Symphony No. 9; "From The New World"
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