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Dynamic Light and Shade Paperback – September 1, 1991


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Dynamic Light and Shade + Dynamic Wrinkles and Drapery: Solutions for Drawing the Clothed Figure + Dynamic Figure Drawing
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Watson-Guptill; Reprint edition (September 1, 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0823015815
  • ISBN-13: 978-0823015818
  • Product Dimensions: 10.9 x 8.2 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (24 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #256,032 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Burne Hogarth’s (1911–1996) remarkable career spanned over 60 years. He wore many hats in the worlds of fine art, art education, and art publishing. He is most famous for his internationally syndicated Sunday newspaper color page feature “Tarzan” (1937–1950) and for his illustrated adaptations of the Edgar Rice Burroughs novels Tarzan of the Apes and Jungle Tales of Tarzan. A co-founder of the School of Visual Arts in New York City, Hogarth remains one of the most influential figures in art education today.

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Customer Reviews

Great book on light and shade.
fiddles
I will not buy any future books from this author as I could probably find any information I needed that he explains on Wikipedia.
Jeremy Canaday
Yet it seems to me a lttle bit like too much information.
"extreme_dig_cm"

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

21 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Stanley D'Chicken on May 22, 2006
Format: Paperback
This book is precise, and it's comprehensive. It may not take you by the hand and say "step 1, draw a circle..." but I don't think this is really a HOW-TO type of book. It's more of a WHY book. It explains to artists the fundamental reasons to use a wide range of specific lighting theories, and it describes these theories very well (Hogarth's explanations work for me, and probably for other people in the worlds of comics, animation, etc.).

This book doesn't aim to be your one-and-only reference on the subject of lighting (an extremely technical subject to be sure). It's primary focus is not on color, but on form, and it may not talk about lighting the way that 3D artists do. But I've learned a ton from this book, and I refer to it often.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By D. Rahmel on May 3, 2006
Format: Paperback
If you're looking for explicit or step-by-step instruction on applying lighting and shadow to your drawing, this probably isn't the book for you. If, on the other hand, you're looking for real-world illustration examples of just about every type of lighting situation (even through fog and rain), be sure to pick this one up!

Burne Hogarth, with his immaculate drawing style, presents examples of everything from multi-point lighting to backlighting. I particularly enjoyed his examples of lighting the foreground, middle ground, and background differently. As always, the author's books are a joy just to look through.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Jeremy Canaday on March 16, 2013
Format: Paperback
The writing style of the author in this book is the same as other books in his entire collection, so if you have read any of his previous books and dislike his teaching style, this book is not for you. The positive points of this book are that it teaches different situations and sources of light: diffractive light, chiaroscuro (1 point, 2 point, etc), sunlight, reflective, radiant light and so on. It taught me a few good points and has some pictures that I might reference if it comes down to it, but what it fails to teach is the Science behind dynamic light and shade. If you are considering this book and you already have applied studies of light and shade, it is a decent book that could give you new ideas to your work. However, if you are wanting a thorough in depth study of this subject, look elsewhere. Each chapter has about a 2 sentence explanation of the type of light it is covering, maybe a few good portrait examples for direction and then BAM! Pictures. More pictures. Even more pictures. Some of the pictures are just more about the pictures of the previous pictures and it gets very dull and counter-intuitive.. For the 15 chapters that this book has, it is good for maybe about 30 sentences and about 20 examples in pictures. Other than that, it is just blown out of proportion. This book is a great idea if you want to BROADEN your scope and try new things with light and shade, but should not be the 1st book of study. For the 150 something pages this book has, it could've been compressed into maybe 10 pages of pure important material for study and the rest is just overkill. I will not buy any future books from this author as I could probably find any information I needed that he explains on Wikipedia.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By laughing water on December 6, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
As others have said, this is not a "how to" book. To me, it is a book of brilliant examples. Its pictures are humbling to me, a budding illustrator. I can see myself spending years studying the pictures and learning through observation. There are no longer master artists who take apprentices, at least none that I know of. The next best thing is to study the works of masters. I intend to study Hogarth's works, in the same spirit of an apprentice of the past.
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9 of 13 people found the following review helpful By "extreme_dig_cm" on June 4, 2006
Format: Paperback
...An intermediate-to-advanced, in-depth, analytical treatment- I really wanted to like this... yet...

Initially flipping quickly through it, it was pretty obvious to me this wasn't going to be one of my favorites. I'm specifically referring to drawing quality- the teaching & concepts here are very detailed, analytical, and sometimes even helpful. Filled with Hogarth's own artwork, as well as work by other artists, the entire book is in black & white mixed-media, and it's stylistically a little different from his other efforts.

Still, the actual teaching here on light & shade is really pretty detailed. Check out this listing of 'light-types' explained & depicted: silhouette; minimal; single-source; double-source; flat-diffused; moonlight; sculptural; spatial; environmental; textural; transparent; fragmentation; radiant; and expressive (whew!). Who knew there were this many kinds of light? Yet it seems to me a lttle bit like too much information. This seems to confirm to me something I had already assumed: besides a few good art instruction books to help with getting started, the best way to learn to draw anything is by copying photos of people & artwork by our own favorite artists. This seems *especially* true in the case of light & shade.

Will some people love this book? Sure! It's nice to see the several Tarzan pictures here- at least for curiosity's sake. But I think most people, including Hogarth fans like myself, will pretty readily admit this book isn't among his best- and it's not the best book for beginners (not recommended!). I'm thinking this will probably be best for confirmed Hogarth fans.

P.S. A better book for beginners? Walt Reed's The Figure! It contains somewhat brief but *excellent* tips on basic light & shade.
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