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Dynamic Wrinkles and Drapery: Solutions for Drawing the Clothed Figure Paperback – October 1, 1995


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Dynamic Wrinkles and Drapery: Solutions for Drawing the Clothed Figure + Dynamic Light and Shade + Dynamic Anatomy: Revised and Expanded Edition
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 144 pages
  • Publisher: Watson-Guptill; 1st edition (October 1, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0823015874
  • ISBN-13: 978-0823015870
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 0.4 x 11 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (63 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #74,532 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Burne Hogarth’s (1911–1996) remarkable career spanned over 60 years. He wore many hats in the worlds of fine art, art education, and art publishing. He is most famous for his internationally syndicated Sunday newspaper color page feature “Tarzan” (1937–1950) and for his illustrated adaptations of the Edgar Rice Burroughs novels Tarzan of the Apes and Jungle Tales of Tarzan. A co-founder of the School of Visual Arts in New York City, Hogarth remains one of the most influential figures in art education today.

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Customer Reviews

I highly recommend it to the dedicated artist.
Andrea Acailawen
I opened the book up and showed my girlfriend and asked her "does this look a little too wrinkly?". "Yeah!" she said with a "duh" tone in her voice.
Tony Hall
Dynamic Wrinkles and Drapery by Burne Hogarth is another must have for any artist, as are all of Hogarth's books.
Sylvia Wadlington

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

46 of 47 people found the following review helpful By Andrea Acailawen on April 1, 2004
Format: Paperback
This is an excellent *solutions manual* for the artist who draws human figures or includes fabrics in his or her drawings. If you already draw, and you want to create dynamic fabrics and clothing in your work, this book is for you. The study of wrinkles and drapery in this text very impressive, and was exactly what I was looking for.
***Note: If you don't already know how to draw, this book won't be of much help, as no drawing techniques are included to show you *how* to draw these wrinkles. Some basic drawing knowledge is needed, and assumed. Used with other drawing technique books, however, I think even the beginning art student could get some good theories, understanding and ideas out of this book.***
What makes clothing look natural and lively is how it flows and folds with the body when you sit, stand and move. This text explains how fabric flows with the body and naturally folds in a variety of different situations.
Chapters cover how the body moves and how its movement and positioning effect clothing.
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22 of 23 people found the following review helpful By NeilUnreal on September 6, 2003
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I ordered this book along with "Drawing Dynamic Hands," also by Hogarth (it's excellent as well). I'd been doing mostly figure study, and it was time to make the jump to clothing. I realized I had no idea what a wrinkle looked like (you'd never guess that from my clothes!).
This is a really great book! It's always easier to practice using interpretations that have been filtered through the eyes of other artists. Hogarth's style is exaggerated, but this is exactly what makes this book a great learning tool and reference.
I do understand how someone could be put-off by this type of illustration, but I feel the principals shown in the book can be applied to other styles as well. I happen to like this style of illustration -- it's probably nostalgia on my part; I grew up reading comics illustrated by Burne Hogarth -- but I was worried that it was inadequate for learning fine-art. I find now that I was wrong about Hogarth as a teacher. His books have helped me improve my technique, without changing my style overmuch. His exaggerations illustrate and teach the concepts well, without requiring one to duplicate them.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By E.J. Barnes on August 26, 2003
Format: Paperback
You absolutely need a good background in human anatomy (i.e. the skeleton, muscles, and nude figure) before tackling this book. That said, I have not seen anyone else describe the rules of how fabric hangs, stretches, and crinkles on the stationary and moving human body (and on furniture). "Lines" on clothing I just thought of as a confusing and arbitrary muddle turn out to be much more systematic than I ever imagined.
He groups wrinkles by the forces exerted to produce them -- direct thrust, bend, crossing, compression (a subclass of crossing wrinkles), fragmentation, swag/hanging, trap/closure, flying, and passive/inert/lying wrinkles. I still don't understand the chapter on fragmentation wrinkles (hence only 4 stars), but all the other categories were clearly described and illustrated. He also notes the differences in wrinkles caused by different thicknesses or textures of fabric.
His examples are heavily influenced by his decades of professional experience in adventure comics (e.g. Tarzan) and period illustration, but the rules they reveal still apply. Fashions change, but how fabric behaves on the body is eternal. Essential.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Jon Kemerer on February 4, 2001
Format: Paperback
Obviously, nothing can replace the old-fashioned method of going out and observing wrinkles as they appear in the real world. If that is your intention, this book can help tremendously by giving you a clue on what to look for as you're studying cloth. Also, this book is fantastic for teaching you how wrinkles appear if you'll be drawing from memory.
Topics include drawing compression wrinkles, crossing wrinkles, flying wrinkles, swag and hanging wrinkles, bend wrinkles, passive, inert, and lying wrinkles,... as well as a section on understanding kinetic forces which may prove to be the most helpful to you.
Also, the drawings are awesome and have given me a new-found respect for Brune. His "Light and Shade" book is also remarkable.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on August 6, 2000
Format: Paperback
An excellent _technical_ treatise on how to draw drapery for all levels of artist. This book covers it all, detailing how every wrinkle type is formed and where it flows. A _must have_ for any serious artist.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Annaleise Ferreira on March 10, 2003
Format: Paperback
I got this book about five years ago in an art store, and it's had a huge impact on my drawing. Making clothes respond naturally to a human body's shape and movement is one of the big challenges to artists, and this book gives tons of examples of different kinds of wrinkles caused by different movements and kinds of cloth. For example, compression wrinkles caused by stiff cloth which holds its shape and pipe organ drapery caused by heavy thick cloth such as a curtain. It's also very good for training your eye to notice things in real life, so that you can go beyond just the examples in the book. The illustrations are large and detailed and very clear. Even though the style's a little dated, the rules still apply. I'd recommend this to any aspiring artist.
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