Eagle Against the Sun: The American War with Japan and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

EAGLE AGAINST THE SUN: THE AMERICAN WAR WITH JAPAN [Hardcover] Unknown Binding – January 1, 1985


See all 25 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$14.95

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Unknown Binding
  • Publisher: Free Press (1985)
  • ASIN: B004M9JJ84
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (79 customer reviews)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
50
4 star
21
3 star
5
2 star
3
1 star
0
See all 79 customer reviews
It is simply the best single book on World War II in the Pacific.
Germania
This is a very well written and informative book, and it gives a good high level overview of the war in the Pacific.
Michael Shapiro
I highly recommend this book if you want a concise, but thorough study of WWII in the Pacific.
Alan M. Gardner

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

120 of 121 people found the following review helpful By Barron Laycock HALL OF FAME on June 21, 2000
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Good books devoting themselves to the overall scope and breadth of Pacific campaign against the Japanese during World War Two are hard to find, but this book solves the reader's problem nicely. It is a comprehensive, entertaining, and fair-minded book that careful details both Japanese and Allied perspectives before, during, and at the conclusion of the war. This book is truly a carefully constructed, exhaustively researched and quite well documented one-volume history that everyone should love. I first discovered it on the syllabus of a graduate-level Harvard history course, and have had it on my shelf ever since. Written in a very accessible style that allows the reader to stream through as though one is reading a novel, and it is filled with interesting anecdotes and new insights that keep the reader entertained and interested throughout the nearly 600 pages of the book. My own personal favorite was an actual complaint filed immediately after the attack at Pearl Harbor by a Hawaiian resident of a dog who was allegedly barking in Morse code to the Japanese ships offshore. It is also offers a number of new thought provoking and intriguing ideas about aspects of the war against Japan for the reader.
The author engages in an active reinterpretation of the war based on declassified intelligence files, archival material, Japanese documents and an impressive collection of interviews with principals involved in the almost five year struggle to defeat the Japanese after the events at Pearl Harbor. It is interesting to learn that the U.S.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
56 of 59 people found the following review helpful By Stephen M. Bainbridge on February 15, 2001
Format: Paperback
As a history of the Pacific War, Eagle Against the Sun is rivalled only by Samuel Eliot Morison's 15 volume classic. Ironically, however, Spector packs far more detail into this classic one volume narrative than Morison managed to include in 15. Where Morison slighted organization, logistics, and sociological issues in favor of action, Spector gives such issues the attention they deserve. The Pacific War was a war of logistics--moving massive volumes of men and material across thousands of miles of ocean. The Pacific War was also a fascinating study in race and gender relations, with early and problematic evolution towards the modern integrated force. Spector addresses all these issues, while still telling an exciting story of action and heroism.
Spector is eminently well-qualified to write such a history. A Marine Corps veteran (Viet Nam), Spector is also a professional historian. He understands combat as few historians do. Spector is also a talented writer, whose prose flows quickly and powerfully.
Spector's careful analysis of the controversial decision to use atomic weapons against Japan is especially well-done. He acknowledges that there are legitimate arguments--both moral and military--against their use. He notes that critics of the decision included not only left-leaning academics, but also army and navy leaders resisting air force officers who believed that SAC rendered the other branches obsolete. Yet, he persuasively argues that tha atomic bombs, coupled with Russia's invasion of Manchuria, were the exogenous shocks that finally destabilized Japan's militarist regime.
In sum, very highly recommended.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
22 of 22 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 25, 1999
Format: Paperback
Reading about the Pacific War in the new WWII novel, "The Triumph and the Glory", spurred me into exploring the topic further, so I picked up a copy of "Eagle Against the Sun" and was very impressed. It is solidly researched, very readable, all in all one of the better history volumes about the great struggle in the Pacific between the United States and Imperial Japan.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
28 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Smallchief on January 5, 2003
Format: Paperback
This is a very good one-volume history of World War II in the Pacific. It is fast-paced, easy reading, and balanced. The author covers all aspects of the war with roughly the emphasis they deserve, shifting back and forth from the high councils of strategy to homely events on the front lines of this brutal, bitter conflict.
"Eagle against the Sun" won't get my highest rating, however, because of its lack of maps. The inside cover has a general map of the Pacific -- and that's all folks. How can a publisher put out a book that contains hundreds of obscure place names and descriptions of complex military maneuvers without at least a dozen detailed maps to illustrate the text? The lack of maps diminishes what would otherwise be an outstanding book.
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Brian W Robinson on September 18, 2003
Format: Paperback
If you've read some of the other reviews this will come as no surprise - - this is a terrific book, but one that is completely lacking in maps to explain the strategic and tactical elements of the various Pacific campaigns that are exhaustively and effectively summarized and described throughout the book. Putting together a narrative that describes and explains the entire Pacific war in about 600 pages is no small task, but this book does the trick. And it's an entertaining read as well. It is a terrific overview of the entire Pacific war that covers every major offensive with appropriate emphasis on the problems of logistics, in-fighting among the allies and among service branches and competition among the various theatres for precious supplies, equipment, arms and manpower. However, the lack of any campaign maps was frustrating and irritating. About halfway through the book, I happened to find the West Point Atlas for the Pacific War at Borders (an absolutely fantastic collection of campaign maps) and scooped it up specifically to use with this book. With the atlas at the ready, Eagle Against The Sun became a much better read. Even if you're fully familiar with the imense geography of the Pacific war, you'll be driven batty by the lack of maps in Eagle Against The Sun. However, the lack of maps is really the book's only material flaw and, in the end, it was easily fixed by pulling out the atlas.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?