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ELIZABETH


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Product Details

  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: Chinese, English, Japanese, Korean, French, Italian, German, Spanish, Portuguese
  • Dubbed: Japanese, Spanish, French, German, Italian
  • Region: Region A/1 (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.66:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: SUPER D / PHANTOM SOUND & VISI
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (716 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0039VHWJ4
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #779,136 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

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Customer Reviews

An historically accurate film would span very very many hours or even more.
D. Garcia
Cate Blanchett is the all-time best actress in the role of the young Queen Elizabeth - outstanding performance, and she looks the part.
C. L. Fluty
When Mary dies, Elizabeth takes the throne, no more than a mere slip of a girl wearing the crown of England.
Lawyeraau

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

139 of 153 people found the following review helpful By Lawyeraau HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on August 22, 2001
Format: VHS Tape
This is a magnificent film with a stellar cast giving award calibre performances. Cate Blanchett deservedly won the Golden Globe Award for Best Actress in a Drama. She is truly the heir apparent to Bette Davis and Glenda Jackson, both having portrayed Elizabeth I in memorable performances. Cate Blanchett now joins their ranks with her own incredible performance in that role.
The movie begins in 1554, in an England that is bitterly divided on the issue of religion. Ruled by Mary Tudor, Henry the VIII's oldest daughter and a devout catholic, protestants are being burned at the stake as heretics, giving rise to Mary's popular name, "Bloody Mary". Reviled by her Spanish husband and in poor health, Mary is badgered by her advisors to do away with Elizabeth, her considerably younger, bastard half-sister. This Mary will not do, no matter how pressed. Still, Elizabeth lives her life with the sword of Damocles hanging over her head at all times.
When Mary dies, Elizabeth takes the throne, no more than a mere slip of a girl wearing the crown of England. Her advisors look to guide her, and she follows their lead, until she determinedly takes control of the reins of power, and follows her own counsel with the help of her most trusted advisor, Francis Walsingham, played to cunning perfection by Geoffrey Rush. With his help, she is able to fend off the ever present threats to her hold on the throne of England, not just from her own courtiers, but from Marie de Guise, Queen of Scotland, deliciously played by Fanny Ardent.
In the film one sees the transformation of Elizabeth take place.
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104 of 114 people found the following review helpful By Constant Librarian on January 6, 2002
Format: VHS Tape
This is a lovely movie, Cate Blanchet's performance as the title character is excellent, as is the rest of the cast. The costumes are spectacular.
As others have noted, this film is entertainment, not history. The writer(s) mixed fact with pure fancy, and compressed many authentic episodes that occured over 40 or so years into the beginning of the reign. Walsingham did not kill Marie de Guise, nor did he oust Cecil as Elizabeth's primary advisor. Robert Dudley was not involved in any murder plot. I won't bore you with the rest of the laundry list.
I think it only fair to point out that in my opinion, despite the inaccuracies, the writer(s) did manage to give a fairly accurate view of some major aspects of Elizabeth I's entire reign. She did use possible marriage as a political tool. And she was damned adept at doing so. Elizabeth did have a more moderate religious policy than either of her two predecessors.
The movie is worth watching. And, if seeing it whets your curiosity, read any of the several popular level biographies of
Elizabeth I. Alison Weir's _The Life of Elizabeth I_ is very well written.
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33 of 36 people found the following review helpful By Monika on February 5, 2005
Format: DVD
Queen Elizabeth I of England is one of the most impressive figures in European history. She came to the throne in 1558 at the age of twenty-five, upon the death of her half sister, Mary I. It was a time of much political instability, and the young Queen's task was made even more difficult by the fact that her legitimacy was by no means universally acknowledged (many saw her father Henry VIII's marriage to Elizabeth's mother, Anne Boleyn, as being invalid, since he was never granted a Papal dispensation for the annulment of his first marriage to Catherine of Aragon, Mary's mother), and by the fact that Elizabeth was a Protestant. And on top of all this, many of the English people were far from jubilant at the prospect of another female ruler, after the disastrous reign of her sister Mary. The years immediately following Elizabeth's ascent to the throne, therefore, were fraught with uncertainty and danger. In order to retain her crown and win the hearts of her people, Elizabeth would have to become a strong, almost superhuman figure, and it is this formative process that the film "Elizabeth" seeks to show us.

Unfortunately, the film does not entirely succeed. Elizabeth reigned for 44 years, an extremely long time. Her maturation and the development of her status as a national icon were shaped by a series of trials, both political and personal, that took place over the course of multiple decades. It would be nearly impossible to accurately show all this in a 2-hour movie. "Elizabeth" suffers from the fact that the makers of the film simply tried to cram too much material into the 124 minutes they had to work with.
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129 of 153 people found the following review helpful By Themis-Athena on February 2, 2003
Format: DVD
Among Great Britain's monarchs, two queens stand out in particular: Elizabeth I. and Queen Victoria. Both came to power at extremely young ages, and at times of political instability which would have set the odds of survival against any new ruler, but particularly so, against a woman. Both beat those odds in ways few people would have foreseen: They not only persevered but ruled for a nearly unparalleled long time, and during their reign achieved to both strengthen England's economy and international stance and give new direction to its society. We have long come to identify their reign as "the Victorian Age" and "the Elizabethan Age," respectively. Yet, while "Victorian England" is an expression often used synonymously with moral conservativism, Elizabeth I. fostered not only the development of science but also the theater and arts; providing fertile ground for the works of Shakespeare, Marlowe and many others. (Influenced by her husband, Queen Victoria supported the exploration of new scientific developments, but the dominant force of her formative years as a ruler was conservative prime minister Lord Melbourne, who once advised her not to read Dickens because his books were "full of unpleasant subjects.") And while Queen Victoria derived strength from her long, stable marriage to German-born Prince Albert, Elizabeth I. resisted the pressure to marry at all and became known as "the Virgin Queen."

Looking back at Elizabeth's reign, we see less a woman than an icon; the symbol of what her rule has come to stand for.
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