Customer Reviews


84 Reviews
5 star:
 (40)
4 star:
 (12)
3 star:
 (16)
2 star:
 (9)
1 star:
 (7)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


102 of 111 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars THE book of the fallacy - a witty read
This book is a reproduction of the classic out of print book entitled "Book of the Fallacy: A Training Manual for Intellectual Subversives", which is one of the greatest and wittiest books ever written about fallacies and argument I've ever read.
I'm happy to see that it is now available again - for a reasonable price, because it makes a wonderful gift especially for...
Published on November 15, 2006 by ProcessBooks

versus
84 of 89 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Dictionary of Fallacies
I think the Fallacy here is that you would learn about giving your arguments more strength and beating your opponent on a verbal battle. While you might glean some useful tidbits, this book is really more of a dictionary or appendix of Fallacies. Though well written enough and interesting it should be treated more of a reference for writers than anything else. You would...
Published on October 10, 2009 by CollectedReader


‹ Previous | 1 29 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

84 of 89 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Dictionary of Fallacies, October 10, 2009
This review is from: EPZ How to Win Every Argument: The Use and Abuse of Logic (Paperback)
I think the Fallacy here is that you would learn about giving your arguments more strength and beating your opponent on a verbal battle. While you might glean some useful tidbits, this book is really more of a dictionary or appendix of Fallacies. Though well written enough and interesting it should be treated more of a reference for writers than anything else. You would probably find more meaning in "Thank you for Arguing" or "Logical Self Defense"; both of which I highly recommend for people studying Critical Thinking, or Rhetoric.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


102 of 111 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars THE book of the fallacy - a witty read, November 15, 2006
This book is a reproduction of the classic out of print book entitled "Book of the Fallacy: A Training Manual for Intellectual Subversives", which is one of the greatest and wittiest books ever written about fallacies and argument I've ever read.
I'm happy to see that it is now available again - for a reasonable price, because it makes a wonderful gift especially for young adults, or for anyone who would enjoy learning to win arguments.
I equate this book in importance to a parent teaching their child boxing to defend themselves on the playground. This book teaches how to defend themselves in debate, where one's opponent will cry uncle from a few well placed "argumentum ad ignorantiam" or a couple "tu quoque" with a swift kick in the rump from a well placed "red herring" as they scamper a way and submit in defeat.
If there is any question of the value this book has to us "fallacy buffs", simply look at the used book prices for the original book, and thank your lucky stars that it is now available again.
Madsen Pirie is the master.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


93 of 103 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Turn your brain into a Swiss Army Knife with this combination sword, shield, and bulls**t detector, August 18, 2006
By 
Zeno (New Jersey) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
There are a lot of critical thinking books out there, but few are as easily accessible and entertaining as "How to Win Every Argument: The Use and Abuse of Logic." It shines a light on all the hidden trip wires, trap doors, and funhouse mirrors that the professional spinners use to keep us dizzy.

Wouldn't you like to learn how to see through all their smoke and mirrors? In this day and age, can any of us really afford not to?

Like its predecessor (the out-of print "Book of the Fallacy") this is a cure for our near-sighted world, especially in these days when-- whether from information overload or apathy-- we all seem to passively accept our collective blurred vision.

But don't worry, every trick in the book is revealed here in easy, to-the-point explanations. Straw men, red herrings, wishful thinking, etc--if you don't know what they are, you should-- they are the oily wool that lawyers, politicians, interest groups, media, organized religion, and out-and-out-con artists pull over your eyes everyday.

Here is the ultimate set of shears against them all. No more picked pockets, washed brains, and swiped votes. A lot of people would prefer if you didn't read this book and learn its valuable secrets-- and by all means don't, if you want them to continue to have their way. As for the rest of you, an eye-opening awaits...
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


23 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Entertaining and educational, December 6, 2006
By 
There's a lot to like about this book, as it's entertaining, witty, and educational on top of all that. The title isn't really an accurate reflection of what's in the book, although he does talk about winning arguments too. The author clearly seems to know a lot about argument and about fallacies, and he is able to present the information in a manner that is clever (in the best sense of the word) and he uses many amusing examples. Since the book is done in short sections, it is ideal to pick up and read when time is short, or perhaps left on the nightstand to read a fallacy or two before sleeping. On the other hand, I liked it enough that I read it in just a couple of days, wanting to know what the next fallacy was and what the next example would be.

There are 79 fallacies listed alphabetically from the the Abusive Analogy through Wishful Thinking, although there are lists that show how they can be subdivided for reasons of classification by type at the end of the book. Each fallacy is treated in a similar manner starting with the name of the fallacy, an explanation of what it means, and a couple of examples of how it works. There is then a discussion of the fallacy that goes into history of the fallacy, who might want to use it, for whom it might be most effective, and sometimes a pithy summary of the fallacy. After another example the author discusses how one might use the fallacious reasoning to one's own benefit and gives an example of how that might be done.

Many examples are given, often using economics and politics, and there is a tendency on the author's part to use British examples. Most of them are amusing and clever and the author's commentary is quite lively and entertaining, and the wordplay is wonderful. Sometimes one wishes for references for the examples (even though references aren't really needed), such as the one on page 44 which discusses the Cum hoc ergo propter hoc fallacy (that assumes that events which occurred together are causally connected). The example is: "A US legislator recently noted that a high crime rate correlated with a high prison population, and suggested that the prisoners be released in order to cut the crime figures." If this is true (and I suppose it might be) it would be fun to know who said it. There is very little of formal logic in the book and much informal logic, but the book clearly presupposes that you find logic and reason to be more important than anything else in argument and discussion.

It would even make a great gift for somebody on your list that might benefit from thinking more clearly, or at least more like you.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


48 of 56 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Defend yourself!, July 5, 2006
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
How do you expect to defend yourself against the onslaught of words, words, words, if you were not equipped in school with the weapons to do so? Rather than a "reading" book, this is a "stick it in the face of those who don't know how to think or care to learn" book. Buy it for your own safety's sake.

Classical education used to teach one how to think -- grammar, logic, rhetoric -- after which one practiced on subjects. Nowadays, one learns subjects leaving to chance one will also learn to think. What's more, people cannot discern fuzzy thinking through fuzzy thinking. Do yourself a favor, a favor for those with whom you associate, and a favor to society -- do not walk around unarmed.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


42 of 49 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Book has worth, just not for what title suggests., May 6, 2009
By 
This review is from: EPZ How to Win Every Argument: The Use and Abuse of Logic (Paperback)
"Win" is a painless, often entertaining introduction to a broad list of logical fallacies, arranged in alphabetical order (I found this choice of organization odd and ironically illogical, but Pirie makes it work all right). It is not even remotely on how to win arguments, something "Thank You For Arguing," with its focus on rhetoric rather than just logic, does much more effectively.

Pirie is a proper, dignified Englishman, and just lacks the wickedness and ruthlessness needed to provide weapons-grade advice on abusing logic. One senses that while he saw offering advice on winning every argument as a sort of marketable hook, for him really abusing logic is as unthinkable as if the book were about "how to help your daughter star in pornography."

This is not necessarily a bad thing...I would rather be guided in logic by someone who holds logic dear than one who views it as just one more human construct to be prostituted for egoistic gain. I don't want to give the impression, though, that "Win" is too prissy to have any bite. It's got some teeth in it--just not fangs.

All of which probably renders the book's starring role as a refresher for the geezer who's been out of school too long to remember all the logical fallacies, someone who has never had proper exposure to logic as a subject matter, or--and this would be my favorite use of the book--as an adjunct text in high school philosophy or logic class. "Win" is brief, punchy, and informal, and shows off logic's fun side by implicitly alluding to its use as a competitive advantage. Who wouldn't want to scold the school bully for "affirming the consequent"? How demoralizing.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good dictionary, March 23, 2008
This review is from: EPZ How to Win Every Argument: The Use and Abuse of Logic (Paperback)
This book works like a dictionary. It's pretty useful for studying for the LSAT, as I'm currently doing. Some of the entries are common sense but the majority are written with elegant humour. It's more pleasurable to skip from argument to argument than reading it straight through from front to back as you'll probably need to go back to specific ones and work out their intricacies. I enjoy Madsen's writing quite a bit. Also helps that I have a Scottish inclination over English. His examples and tone are down to earth and no BS - which is rare. It's also pleasurable to see him use one fallacy as an example for explaining another fallacy for he shows you how to use a fallacy accurately and well.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An encyclopedia of logical fallacies, November 25, 2009
Madsen Pirie delightfully perpetuates the stereotype of droll Englishmen in this wonderful encyclopedia of logical fallacies.

The title is somewhat misleading as Pirie doesn't really provide any guides to semantic trickery that will allow you to overcome the opponent unfortunate enough to engage you in reasoned debate.

Rather Pirie provides the reader with very useful definitions and examples of 79 varieties of logical fallacies. Study these, train yourself to evaluate what you hear and read against these descriptions and you will be able to massacre any opponent who gives you a chance to get a word in. When you read or merely listen, you'll quickly learn - big surprise - that few people are logical. In fact, most of the things we are told by politicians and other public figures score high on logical fallacy list.

Pirie is droll, no two ways about it. His writing style may actually baffle or even offend those who don't see the humor running throughout the book. That doesn't mean it's a joke book: just that Madsen Pirie is a fun kind of guy in a very subtle way.

This is the kind of thing that should be taught in high schools and colleges, but won't be, lest the students see how illogical their teachers and the system they are trapped in are.

Great book, handy to have around in an age where reason is under hourly attack.

Jerry
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


47 of 67 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Misleading title, July 8, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: EPZ How to Win Every Argument: The Use and Abuse of Logic (Paperback)
The entire book is a listing, in alphabetical order, of types of uses of language traditionally called "rhetorical devices," many under their Latin names. The explanations given for each are not particularly well-written or clear, and many of the examples used are obtuse. At the end of every alphabetical listing there is a not very helpful sentence or two of how you might use each device. It is unclear why having the Latin name in your head of a fallacious argument that most people would recognize immediately as fallacious is a way to "win every argument." The author's explanation is that if you are able to put a Latin name to something your opponent is arguing, you will make it sound like s/he is "suffering from a rare tropical disease." Why the author thinks this is a positive thing is not entirely clear to me. He further states that throwing Latin around will make you seem "erudite and authoritative." I don't know what circles the author travels in, but in America at least, this type of behavior is more likely to make you sound pompous and condescending.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 11 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A good idea, but not awesome execution, June 2, 2010
By 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: EPZ How to Win Every Argument: The Use and Abuse of Logic (Paperback)
This book straight up lists a whole bunch of logical fallacies, and dedicates a page or two to describing each one. The fallacies discussed in the book are interesting to read, and definitely the list of the ones that are covered is pretty comprehensive. The author comes up with plenty of appropriate examples, and generally doesn't stick around on one topic for too long, which is good.

But the writing style I found to be a little hard to read, with the author seemingly overly big words just for the sake of matching the equally-meaningless latin phrases that make up a lot of the fallacies themselves. There's a lot of wit injected in the book too...in fact I might argue too much, as the author seems to be *constantly* trying to come up with something witty to say. The combination of constant attempts to be funny and the "aloof" writing style made it a lot harder than I think it should have been to get through the book.

My last complaint is all the fallacies are presented in alphabetical order, which totally doesn't make sense at all unless you're trying to be a reference book. Maybe that was the goal, though I still think there's any number of alternate orders that could have made life a lot easier. Especially considering how often a fallacy has a "logical" counterpart, which are likely nowhere near each other.

If you're looking for a reference book on logical fallacies, this will fit the bill relatively well. If you just want a good read about messing with people's heads, I might look elsewhere.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 29 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

EPZ How to Win Every Argument: The Use and Abuse of Logic
EPZ How to Win Every Argument: The Use and Abuse of Logic by Madsen Pirie (Paperback - November 1, 2007)
$18.95 $13.15
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Search these reviews only
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.