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ESPN Films 30 for 30: Broke


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Product Details

  • Actors: Andre Rison, Bernie Kosar, Herm Edwards, Keith McCants
  • Format: NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: Team Marketing
  • Run Time: 79 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B009L9LC4E
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #58,262 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Special Features

None.

Editorial Reviews

Sucked into bad investments, stalked by freeloaders and saddled with medical problems, most pro athletes get shocked by harsh economic realities after years of living the high life. Drawing surprisingly vulnerable confessions from retired stars like Keith McCants, Bernie Kosar, Leon Searcy and Andre Rison, this fascinating documentary from Billy Corben (The U, Cocaine Cowboys) digs into the psychology of men whose competitive nature carries them to victory on the field and ruin off it.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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See all 19 customer reviews
Self control and boundaries are needed to handle the enormous weight that comes with big money.
Runner_Chris
I'm like damn, if only I could've been blessed enought to had achieved what these dudes did just to get to that point to be able to make that kind of money.
Eric Robinson
This was an excellent documentary of the pitfalls of young men being exposed to large sums of money.
Danny L. Banks, Sr.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Runner_Chris on March 28, 2013
Verified Purchase
The ESPN 30 30 Broke movie is a high paced snapshot of a world I was unfamiliar with before viewing this documentary a few times. I learned about things I never knew existed like "making it rain" in clubs. Something inconceivable to middle class people with kids to provide for.

First, I'm grateful for the athletes that were open about the life styles that led to being financially broke. The earnings of pro athlete are mind boggling to be blunt.

A few take away lessons from a variety of athletes that have gone from riches to broke include:
1. Self control and boundaries are needed to handle the enormous weight that comes with big money. More money means more weight to carry on your shoulders. Surround yourself with relationships that will be good for you after the glory days are done. Real families and friendships take work.

2. Have a proactive financial plan that includes a couple of things. A monthly updated networth statement which shows what you own and owe. A monthly spending plan that plans for this coming months expenses. Spend it on paper first before spending a dollar in real life. Track both the networth and budget with software that is easy to use. I suggest excel because that is what I use. Print these on paper and spend a few minutes actually planning and thinking about goals and reviewing the past for progress and possible improvements.

3. Have a few strategies in place knowing the huge pay days will come to a sudden end. Average pro carear is short.
A. To prevent huge child support payments have the 1 hour vasectomy surgery today.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By C. E. CARTER on December 23, 2012
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The ignorance and bufoonery of some of the individuals featured in this documentary is saddening. More than 30 years before this documentary was put together, while he was doing color commentary for ABC's Baseball Game of the Week, I remember hearing Major League Baseball Hall-of-Famer Reggie Jackson say, "By the time a young athlete learns how to properly invest his money --he doesn't have any."
I don't know if it's true, but someone said Shaquille Oneal, in giving his philosophy on safe-guarding his earnings said, "pay all your taxes and put the rest in the bank." Simple but sound advice. It seems some of the former professional athletes featured in this documentary had the twisted and self-destructive notion that wasting and throwing money away improved self esteem and self worth. It's too bad most of the people around them in their "Hey Day" were leeches, takers, gold diggers, and yes men. And since most of them attended those Division-One colleges and universities because of the top-notch multi-million dollar athletic programs, NCAA championship tournaments, or nationally-televised Bowl games, getting an education was secondary -if not passed up and ignored altogether. So after their "15 minutes" of well-paid fame in the spotlight as a sports celebrity is gone, they have virtually nothing to fall back on. And the bills and debts remain.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Lauren on April 20, 2013
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I used this documentary as a teaching tool because we were starting a personal finance unit. I teach math and this was super helpful for my students who all think that they are going to become some big professional player. They realize that if you spend more than you make, you are broke! That is no matter if you make $10,000 a year or hundreds of millions of dollars.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Brannon'sMom on December 31, 2012
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Very informative. There were people that I didn't even know that were "broke." I really enjoy these types of documentaries.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By J. Williams on January 30, 2013
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If you know how to manage money you will find it interesting. If you do not know how to manage money it will be a tutorial in what not to do. Watched it with five other people. There was shock, amusement and disbelief among the watchers but everyone enjoyed it.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Patrick L. Randall VINE VOICE on June 30, 2013
ESPN's 30 for 30 series continues to be one of the best documentary shows there is (this includes historical and political documentary series, as well). Unlike the very shallow Sports Century snippets they began running in 1999, 30 for 30 delves deep into major moments, personalities and issues in sports. "Broke" is one of the best episodes the series has produced.

Directed by Billy Corben, who produced the enormously entertaining episode on the Miami Hurricanes called "The U", "Broke" chronicles an ongoing, mind-boggling problem with professional athletes: how can they may so much money in their careers and still end up 'broke'. There may be the occasional Sports Center feature on this, or the a piece in Sports Illustrated but, those don't come close to the visual commentary provided by athletes who held on to their money, athletes who lost it all, coaches and agents who have tried to educate them, and financial experts providing background on how this happens in the first place. You get horror stories about players like Bernie Kosar, Andre Rison and Keith McCants. You also see the success of players who managed to avoid the pitfalls, like Reggie Wilkes and Jamal Mashburn.

An initial reaction from the average person may be to feel no sympathy for these individuals who got enormously rich playing a children's game. To react that way would be a mistake. While these travails are magnified when professional athletes endure them, it reveals a much greater problem affecting society in all walks of life: financial illiteracy. It doesn't matter if you're making $10 an hour as a waiter for $15 million a year as a quarterback, if you don't understand how money works and how to make it work for you, you will end up in horrible financial straits.
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ESPN Films 30 for 30:  Broke
This item: ESPN Films 30 for 30: Broke
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