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Brass Game


List Price: $59.99
Price: $41.75 & FREE Shipping. Details
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Only 1 left in stock.
Sold by ToysNGamesEtc and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
  • For 3-4 players
  • Takes 2-3 hours to play
  • Great historical strategy game
30 new from $37.99

Frequently Bought Together

Brass Game + Tzolk'in: The Mayan Calendar
Price for both: $82.27

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WARNING:
CHOKING HAZARD -- Small parts. Not for children under 3 yrs.

Product Details

  • Product Dimensions: 14 x 10 x 3 inches ; 3.4 pounds
  • Shipping Weight: 3.5 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Shipping: This item is also available for shipping to select countries outside the U.S.
  • ASIN: B000YLHK8K
  • Item model number: 101081N
  • Manufacturer recommended age: 10 - 15 years
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #109,294 in Toys & Games (See Top 100 in Toys & Games)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
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Product Description

From the Manufacturer

Your goal in Brass is to build cotton mills, coal mines, iron works, canals, railways, ports, and shipyards, and to have them be used so that they score points. Your choices will be limited by the cards you draw, but not as much as by the plans you make. Lots of interesting detail in the historical Lancashire setting.

Product Description

Brass is set in 18th century Lancashire at the beginning of what would eventually be called the Industrial Revolution. It starts at the beginning of the Canal Age and ends after the development of railways. Players take the roles of entrepreneurs attempting to make the most money from the various industries of the time. Cotton dominates the game but players ignore the other industries such as coal mining and engineering at their peril.

Customer Questions & Answers

Customer Reviews

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See all 8 customer reviews
Lots of fun if you like strategy games.
peas75
It's worth mentioning that Brass can be readily played online at orderofthehammer, and many consider this a great way to learn the game.
Godly Gadfly
Your best play on every turn (and your opponent's best play after yours) depends highly on the changing nature of these game aspects.
M. Fritz

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Andrew C. Ek on June 20, 2010
Verified Purchase
"Brass" is a definite brain-burner. By that, I mean that it takes a solid hour or two of good concentration and focus in order to play well. Moreover, it is a fairly unforgiving game, in that one or two fairly minor mistakes can make for a 20-point swing.

It is still my favourite board game by a decent margin. The variance in strategy, the synergy between mechanics, and even the quirky rules exceptions all endear themselves to me, as does the difficulty inherent in the game. It's extremely elegant, and progression through the game feels organic and natural.

This is not a game for those who have a hard time focusing, nor is it a game for those who do not like to think. It is, however, a substantial amount of fun for those willing to play it a few times. (Also: there are online implementations, and a robust selection of strategies at the boardgamegeek website). And it's nowhere near as complicated as people make it out to be... it just takes a bit of time.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By M. Fritz on March 25, 2011
Verified Purchase
Brass contains all the German-style board game (or "eurogame") features that make the genre enjoyable and re-playable. But Brass not only meets expectations, it also exceeds them.

(The meat of my review is below, but if you're impatient like me and want to have a one sentence summary, I'd describe Brass as: "Excellent, but not for beginners.")

Brass first exceeds expectations through its interesting "flipping" mechanic. In brief, flipping means that you can gain income and victory points through your own actions or those of your opponents. The game thus rewards players who can figure out their opponents strategies, requiring a level of opponent awareness that games like Race for the Galaxy and Ticket to Ride don't. Requiring awareness of your opponents' strategies isn't a unique feature, but it's designed very well in Brass. (It certainly feels less haphazard and random than the "opponent awareness" that Puerto Rico requires [think Captain phase].)

Second, it succeeds in introducing several "supply and demand" mechanics: iron demand, coal demand, and cotton demand. Your best play on every turn (and your opponent's best play after yours) depends highly on the changing nature of these game aspects. The game keeps your interest as a result.

Third, it incorporates an upgrading mechanic, allowing you to develop your industries to give you more income and victory points.

Criticisms:
Rulebook: Unlike many euros, this game was originally published in English, but you wouldn't know it from the rulebook. The game is complicated and the rulebook adds to the confusion. There also isn't a third-party rewrite of the rules on the internet yet.

Coin Tokens: The game comes with plastic silver and copper coins.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Godly Gadfly on June 24, 2012
It's much-loved. It's heavy. It's thematic. It's quirky. It's deep. It's Martin Wallace. It's Brass. And it's brilliant.

Officially released as a game for 3-4 players, but perfectly playable with a popular 2 player variant, Brass offers an incredible gaming experience that few other games can match. You and your fellow players will head to 19th century Lancashire during the Industrial Revolution, and with the help of the cards you draw, make important choices in your quest for prosperity and points. The striking industrial revolution theme is very present, and is closely integrated with the game-play, making for a strong relationship between theme and mechanics as is often the case with Martin Wallace games. Are you ready for the tough economic challenge of building cotton mills, coal mines, iron works, canals, railways, ports, and shipyards, in what many people consider to be Wallace's magnus opus?

It has to be admitted that the somewhat clunky rules can be a beast to learn for new players, but they are well worth the effort. It's worth mentioning that Brass can be readily played online at orderofthehammer, and many consider this a great way to learn the game. Brass is altogether a tough and heavy economic game, and the game-play offers a tremendous range of strategies, choices, and options. In view of this it has very high replayability, and its many strengths lead many to consider it Martin Wallace's best game. In fact, many consider Brass to be unsurpassed, and the best game ever. It has been the subject of many accolades for its numerous outstanding features that recommend it to serious gamers. As an extra bonus, a fan-suggested two player variant has proven highly satisfactory, so you're not required to have a minimum of three players to enjoy Brass.
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By ap_76 on April 4, 2014
Verified Purchase
This is a Top 20 game on Board Game Geek, and it's there for a reason. There are a lot of subtle interactions in it and plenty of strategic decisions to be made. It's a game where you're often tight on money (much like Power Grid), but you have to be careful because a lot of what you build can be used by other players to their benefit. Manipulating turn order is an important skill because of this.

I've only played 3 games but I'm definitely looking forward to playing again. This is the only Martin Wallace game I've actually enjoyed so far.
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