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Eagle Song (Puffin Chapters) Paperback – March 1, 1999


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Frequently Bought Together

Eagle Song (Puffin Chapters) + The Iroquois: The Six Nations Confederacy (American Indian Nations) + Children of the Longhouse
Price for all three: $17.03

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Product Details

  • Age Range: 7 - 10 years
  • Grade Level: 2 and up
  • Lexile Measure: 680L (What's this?)
  • Series: Puffin Chapters
  • Paperback: 80 pages
  • Publisher: Puffin; 1 edition (March 1, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0141301694
  • ISBN-13: 978-0141301693
  • Product Dimensions: 7.7 x 5 x 0.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #12,659 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

It's a shock for fourth-grader Danny Bigtree to move to Brooklyn from his Mohawk Nation reservation: suddenly he has no friends, and his classmates taunt him, asking him where his war pony is and telling him to go home to his teepee. After his charismatic father makes a class visit to talk about Iroquois culture, his peers begin to warm up to him. Bruchac, author of numerous books with Native American themes, weaves into the story the legend of the great peacemaker Aionwahta, who united five warring Indian nations into the Iroquois Confederacy and turned an enemy into an ally. Can Danny be, like Aionwahta, an agent of peace, and find a way to transform the school bully into a friend? This appealing portrayal of a strong family offers an unromanticized view of Native American culture, and a history lesson about the Iroquois Confederacy; it also gives a subtle lesson in the meaning of daily courage. Illustrations not seen by PW. Ages 7-9.
Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From School Library Journal

Grade 3-4?Danny Bigtree, lonely for the Mohawk reservation he left two months ago and alienated from his fourth-grade classmates in his Brooklyn school, yearns for acceptance. When his father returns to their city apartment from his construction job, Danny opens up about his persecution at school. By sharing the Iroquois legend of Aionwahta (Hiawatha), Richard Bigtree guides his son toward traditional sources of strength and peacemaking. The man visits the classroom where he shares the same tale, eliciting positive responses. Then Danny's schoolyard nemesis throws a basketball right at his face, bloodying his nose and lips, and Danny wonders if this act was intentional. Then his father is injured in a high-steel accident. Peaceful resolution comes on the schoolyard, and reassuring signs from his recuperating dad round out the narrative. Stock characters carry the didactic story. The father "elder" figure becomes one-dimensional: all noble, wise, and patient. This story lacks dialogue and character development and has far too much exposition. There is a heaviness to the teachings. Murky, dark, black-and-white prints have no child appeal. Craig Kee Strete's The World in Grandfather's Hands (Clarion, 1995) deals with an angry, modern Indian boy in urban America through far more complex characters.?Jacqueline Elsner, Athens Regional Library, GA
Copyright 1997 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Joseph Bruchac is a highly acclaimed Abenaki children's book author, poet, novelist and storyteller, as well as a scholar of Native American culture. Coauthor with Michael Caduto of the bestselling Keepers of the Earth series, Bruchac's poems, articles and stories have appeared in over 500 publications, from Akwesasne Notes and American Poetry Review to National Geographic and Parabola. He has authored more than 50 books for adults and children. For more information about Joseph, please visit his website www.josephbruchac.com.

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 17, 2004
Format: Paperback
Danny, an American Indian, has moved to the city. The kids at his school all ignore him or, the ones who do give him any attention, tease and bully him. One day he asked his father for advice about his schoolmates. His father tells him a story about Aionwahta, the hero/peacemaker between all the tribes. He made everything peaceful and turned an enemy into a brother. He grew a pine tree and put an eagle on top of the pine to make sure the peace will never be destroyed again. Danny wants to be just like Aionwahta. Can he turn his enemy into a brother, or at least a friend? This is a story of courage and overcoming obstacles, with the help of his family. Danny uses his courage to try to fix himself and his surroundings.
I really enjoyed this book because it was written so "smoothly." You felt like you were watching this story go by through a hidden window.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on March 17, 2004
Format: Paperback
I read the Eagle song and it was o.k. I didn't like it a lot,but it wasn't horrible either. I like the way his dad told him not to worry about what other peoplen think. Becase i get picked on a lot.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 31, 1999
Format: Paperback
Because of the lack of short chapter books with urban contemporary Native American protagonists, all public/school libraries should pick this up - especially for NA kids who have just moved from rural/reservation to the big city. It may work best for a parent and child to read together and discuss.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By S.Z. M. on October 18, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A perfect book for boys becoming men in a bullying world..Luckily for Daniel, he has his ancestors, his father and mother, and the ancient Indian ways to lift his spirits.
Joseph Bruchac has written a story that is a good way to spend your time; whether old or young or in between, that will help you reconnect to spiritual wisdom.
Suzanne
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on October 12, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
If you are looking for a great book to discuss how we treat and respect minorities especially Native American, you should get this book. It is a moving story that involves bullying which is great to talk about too. The resolution is very positive and peaceful and overall it is not too much for children. The interest level is appropriate for 8 to twelve year olds, but the reading level is more like fourth grade. The author, as a Native American himself, gently adds details about the culture of Native Americans in the New York area in modern times. I want to get this for my school library and book room.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Teresa Whitehawk on September 9, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The book is in very good shape. I haven't had time to re read it as yet. I bought it for a gift.
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