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Eagle-Sage (The Lon Tobyn Chronicle, Book 3) Mass Market Paperback – March 15, 2001


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Product Details

  • Series: Lon Tobyn Chronicles (Book 3)
  • Mass Market Paperback: 640 pages
  • Publisher: Tor Fantasy; 1st edition (March 15, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0812566866
  • ISBN-13: 978-0812566864
  • Product Dimensions: 4.2 x 1.4 x 6.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,337,416 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

The third and concluding volume of the LonTobyn Chronicle will appeal to those who like their epic fantasy based on politics, economic forces and historic motifs rather on than fairy tales and romance. Mages who physically bond with avian familiars serve pastoral Tobyn-Ser. Its neighboring realm, Lon-Ser, has developed complicated technology. Divided into three megacities called Nals, which maintain a precarious balance through economic and political cold war, Lon-Ser is devoid of magic. Lon-Ser and Tobyn-Ser enjoy a peaceful trade alliance, but the introduction of capitalism and technology into the magical sylvan paradise brings problems: its forests are rapidly disappearing due to a now-lucrative logging trade, and "free" mages have allied with a People's Movement to stop such incursions; most mages, however, remain allied to either the Order or the League, two coalitions engaged in a longstanding power struggle. Then, for the first time in 400 years, an eagle is bound as a mage's familiar--the appearance of an Eagle-Sage always portends war. Jaryd, the new Eagle-Sage, and the others of the Order accept the portent but puzzle over with whom the war will be fought. When Cailin, a young woman of the League, also binds to an eagle, it appears that Tobyn-Ser will be split by some sort of civil conflict. Characterization, although present, plays second fiddle to ideology in this epic. It's as if Robert Jordan began channeling Will and Ariel Durant. Agent, Harold Roth. (Apr.)

Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

"Coe's richly textured world, with its contrasting approaches to magic and science, provides a vivid background for the conclusion of an epic war and change."--Library Journal

More About the Author

David B. Coe is the author of more than a fifteen novels and a dozen short stories. His first series, the LonTobyn Chronicle won the William L. Crawford Fantasy Award as the best new fantasy. He followed the LonTobyn Books with his critically acclaimed Winds of the Forelands and Blood of the Southlands series. His next project, a contemporary urban fantasy called the Case Files of Justis Fearsson, will be published by Baen Books and debuts in January 2015 with SPELL BLIND. David's books have been translated into a dozen languages.
David also writes the historical urban fantasy -- the Thieftaker Chronicles -- as D.B. Jackson.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By victoria osborne on July 31, 2000
Format: Hardcover
yes I read others writing that they found it shallow or unrealistic unreasonable etc...but for me I found it thrilling exciting and nail biting.
I switches back to Jarad as a focal character and his bonding with an eagle which portends war. Along with another mage from a rival league. Civil war breaks out as an evil ghost takes over the power stone of the mages. In the end a curse is broken that binds the dead mages to this realm.
I love the combination of technology and magecraft. High tech verses an agrigarian society. I see the writers soap box platform on saving our old growth forest. I live in the pacific north west and have experienced it a lot and agree.
I look forward to his next book. I find him a fascinating writer with thoughtful insight and three deminsional characters. A real flare for style.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By candyg on March 27, 2000
Format: Hardcover
ever since i first read Children of Amarid i have been VERY excited to read any other David B Coe books. the author is an excellent writer and you grow to love the characters, no matter how annoying they are! The plots are very complex and take many turns, nothing is predicatble. I would suggest this book to anyone who likes a good fantasy
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 28, 2000
Format: Hardcover
I was a bit hesitant about making this purchase since although I found his first book in the series really amazing and interestingly-concieved, I found the second book a bit of a let-down. This third and final book was truly entertaining and well-crafted, albeit still not quite approaching the level of the first book with its focus on one character's journey. The ending was definitely a let down --- too predictable and not enough emotional resonance was developed in developing the arc of a great romance (there was much potential here that could have borne much greater fruit). Still, a very enjoyable read with interesting ideas and characters that make it difficult to put down; better editing and more thought into a more creative ending with some greater element of tragedy (the writing style seems more superficial in this third book than his first novel, perhaps because of its focus on so many different smaller characters to provide momentum to events rather than character development). Still, much better than what is generally available on the market; I think Mr. Coe is proving himself to be a gifted storyteller. I look forward to reading his next fantasy project.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
I was disappointed in the author Coe's character development for the "Eagle Sage". Marar, rival leader to Melyor, is crafty and ingenious one moment, and then a complete idiot in the next scene. The free-mage Tammen and her bumbling cohorts seem way too venal, gullible, and downright dumb to have survived to become adult mages. Lastly, bringing Sartol back from the dead, more powerful than he ever was alive, seemed a bit hokey to me. Sartol's rise and fall from power in this book appeared to be made up as it went along.
I think Coe should have developed a logic to his system of magic that the reader could grasp. Though the main protagonist Jaryd believes that magecraft is a gift from the gods, the overall stupidity of many of the mages leads the reader to think that the ability is a random genetic fluke of some sort.
I gave this book 3 stars because it is 600+ pages, but keeps the reader enertained and turning the pages right to the end-- despite it's shortcomings.
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By Cascia Lutz on September 18, 2013
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
Although book described with "some wear", the spine of the paperback book was in two parts. I had to tape the spine to prevent it from falling apart
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By not4prophet on November 16, 2002
Format: Mass Market Paperback
The beginning of "Eagle-Sage" is quite promising. In the first chapter, Jaryd binds to an eagle, thus fulfilling an ancient prophesy and indicating the mages of the Order will soon go to war. He becomes the new leader of the Order and gathers the mages in the city of Amarid. At first, nobody knows who their enemy will be in the upcoming conflict. The League is still trying to destroy the Order, the Children of the Gods have bought new weapons from Lon-Ser, and a group of "free mages", who serve neither the Order nor the League, are attempting to stir up trouble throughout Tobyn-Ser. Meanwhile, back in Bragor Nal, Melyor has to contend with assassins and a rival sovereign who wants to overthrow her.
It looks like Coe is setting up for a suspenseful finish to his series, but after the first two-hundred pages, the book breaks down. Once the archvillain is revealed, the book loses most of its punch, in part because he turns out to be a weak and poorly-written character, with no apparent personality traits other than a general propensity towards evil. The final four-hundred pages of the book are agonizingly slow (they contain only two action scenes) and developed with almost no skill, as if the author was simply trying to fill up as much space as possible. There are many predictable scenes that should have been omitted. For example, there's one occasion where the head bad guy has Jaryd, Alayna, and several other mages at his mercy, but he decides to leave them alive so that he can taunt them a little longer. Needless to say, this eventually leads to his undoing. How many earlier books and movies have included a scene exactly like this one? Another big problem is the lack of continuity with the earlier books.
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