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Comment: Good copy with moderate cover and page wear from being handled and read. Accessories or dust jacket may be missing. Could be an ex-library copy that will have all the stickers and or marking of the library. Some textual or margin notes and possibly contain highlighting.
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Early man, (Life nature library) Hardcover – 1970

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Product Details

  • Series: Life nature library
  • Hardcover: 200 pages
  • Publisher: Time-Life Books (1970)
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0006BZR56
  • Product Dimensions: 10.9 x 8.4 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.7 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,389,560 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Format: Hardcover
Early Man is a great book to inspire children about paleoanthropology and the evolution of humans. Some of the information is outdated, and there have been many new discoveries since the book was published, but much of the information is still correct. For my 6 1/2 year old, it is a favorite to look through. It has really fueled his imagination.
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Format: Hardcover
Francis Clark Howell (1925- 2007) was an American anthropologist. This book was first published in 1965, and reprinted in 1972.

As to why hominid fossils are so rare, he suggests, "Why so scarce? ... There are many reasons... Men... have never been as numerous as oysters and clams. They existed in small numbers, reproduced slowly and lived a long time. They were... less apt to get mired in bogs, quicksands, and tar pits... They often lived and died out in the open where their bones would be worried by scavengers, nibbled by ants... This is an exceptionally poor preserver of bones... Finally, men have been with us one or two million years. There simply has not been as much time for them to scatter their bones about as there has been for some of the longer-lasting types of animals." (Pg. 15)

He says of Ramapithecus: "Its credentials as man's oldest known direct ancestor are thus advanced one step further. the impressive thing about Ramapithecus is that each bit of additional evidence about it has tended to strengthen rather than weaken the claim being made for it. If this continues a bit longer, its position in the human ancestral line should be secure." (Pg. 38)

The book contains (Pg. 41-45) the famous chart, "The Road to Homo Sapiens," in which a steady progression from Pliopithecus to Proconsul to Ramapithecus to Australopithecus to Homo Erectus to Neanderthal to Cro-Magnon to modern man is presented, making a thoroughly convincing case---except, however, for the fact that Proconsul and Ramapithecus are now rejected as ancestors of humans, and the progression from monkey to upright-walking human is nowhere near as "smooth" as the chart tries to convince us it was.
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Format: Hardcover
Early Man describes the history of hominoid fossil finds along with photographs and drawings as well as art images of the living appearances of the fossil primates. The photograph on page 17 shows a Neanderthal skullcap. The skull drawings on the right side margin of page 33 show the changing forms of the primates Plesiadapis (60-55 million years ago), Smilodectes (50-45 million years ago), Aegyptopithecus (30-28 million years ago), Pliopithecus (23-12 million years ago), and Proconsul (20-10 million years ago), showing the trend as time went on toward the shortening of the jaws and the increasing size of the cranium. The tooth drawings on the right side margin of page 35 show the four cusps of the baboon and the five cusps of the chimpanzee in what is known as a "Y-5" pattern that only apes and humans have. Pages 41-45 (with pages 41-43 as an attached fold-out) feature drawings of and the time ranges for Pliopithecus, Proconsul, Dryopithecus, Oreopithecus, Ramapithecus, Australopithecus africanus, Australopithecus robustus, advanced Austalopithecus, Homo erectus, early Homo sapiens, Solo Man, Rhodesian Man, Neanderthal Man, Cro-Magnon Man, and Modern Man. The drawings on the right side margin of page 51 contrast the pelvises of man and Australopithecus, both of which have short, broad blades and significant flanges, with the pelvis of the gorilla, which has long blades. Page 57 features a portrait drawing of Australopithecus robustus having thick brow ridges, a flattened gorilla-type nose, and projecting large jaws. The skull drawings on the bottom margin of page 81 show the inverse relationship between jaw size and brain size for the chimpanzee, Homo erectus, and man. Pages 90-99 feature art images of a Homo erectus group involved in hunting along with photographs of fossil finds.Read more ›
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I first read this in the late 1960s and was hooked on human evolution ever since. I was lucky enough to meet the author a couple of times before he passed away. His influence on anthropology has not yet been completely recognized.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
very interesting book
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