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379 of 406 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Page turner but very similiar to other books by this author
A real page turner and entertaining read, however...

This author has done this storyline before. He is using almost identical plot lines and enemies as the previous stories. Heck, this story is set with a similar beginning as the last and in the same universe..The major change is a different enemy even they are also billion year old, galaxy-spanning,...
Published on February 28, 2010 by The Chief

versus
87 of 94 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars It's more of the same
William H. Keith Jr. writes under several pseudonyms and I was surprised to discover that I have several of his other books from non-related genres. Having read all of the Heritage, Legacy, and most recent Inheritance Trilogies I was kind of disappointed that Earth Strike has a lot of carry over from those series in technology and plot structure. The book was...
Published on March 19, 2010 by Damien Stewart


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379 of 406 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Page turner but very similiar to other books by this author, February 28, 2010
By 
The Chief (VA, United States) - See all my reviews
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A real page turner and entertaining read, however...

This author has done this storyline before. He is using almost identical plot lines and enemies as the previous stories. Heck, this story is set with a similar beginning as the last and in the same universe..The major change is a different enemy even they are also billion year old, galaxy-spanning, mega-bad-guys bent on the destruction of the human race. Hmm, sound like the Xul again.

I do enjoy the science though and will buy the next series. I just wish more effort was spent on creating a new universe and change of plot lines...

The plot lines in both series:

1. Politicians are idiots and only the military are smart enough to know what's best
2. Civilians are idiots and only the military are smart enough to know what's best
3. Civilians and politicians are proven wrong only after an attack on earth that kills billions
4. Only the Admiral/General of a battle group seems to have all the answers and no one listens to him
5. The billion year old enemy is too stupid or slow to use basic combat tactics or sensors and are constantly caught off guard by humans' creative genius

I wish the author would take note and put more effort into maturing the relationship dynamics between military, civilian, and politicos and NOT make them so stereo typical.

Enjoy
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87 of 94 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars It's more of the same, March 19, 2010
By 
Damien Stewart (Marietta, GA USA) - See all my reviews
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William H. Keith Jr. writes under several pseudonyms and I was surprised to discover that I have several of his other books from non-related genres. Having read all of the Heritage, Legacy, and most recent Inheritance Trilogies I was kind of disappointed that Earth Strike has a lot of carry over from those series in technology and plot structure. The book was entertaining but predictable and at times I'm sure I could find very similar passages from the previous nine books of those series. I just was expecting a little more but overall was satisfied enough to read it over a week or so. The last book of the Inheritance Trilogy I read in a single night the day it released as a comparison. So if you enjoyed other Ian Douglas books I'm sure you'll enjoy this one. I also plan on continuing to read the rest of the series as they are released.
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58 of 67 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Continuing a bothersome trend in science fiction, May 14, 2013
By 
Ben Wolf (United States) - See all my reviews
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Where to begin?

Unfortunately, as we have increasingly seen in the sub-genre of "military SF", techno-babble largely replaces art forms such as character development, dialogue and plot. One can hardly read a single paragraph without being barraged with a series of gee-whiz-how-amazing! numbers running out to the fifth decimal. Rather than understanding our protagonists (their flaws, their strengths, their contradictions), we are treated with dozens of pages devoted to how cool a drive system is, or how fast a missile can fly, or the size of a solar system. It's a cheap tactic which allows authors to skimp on the hard work that really makes a story engrossing. These characters exist only as vehicles for full-on technophilia.

As a result we're left with cookie-cutter SF superheroes and villains. You know the kind: military paragons of virtue concerned only with the most noble of ideals battling nasty, vain, self-serving politicians who want to crush freedom and liberty for all individuals. Douglas' characters are caricatures found in virtually every military SF novel to come out in the last twenty years, completely interchangeable. It's therefore no surprise that none of them ever give the sense of being real, nor is it ever possible to develop an emotional connection with them.

And when I say cookie-cutter, boy do I mean it. Our protagonists are white. Very white. Names like DuPont, Koening, Buchanan. Even four hundred years in the future the demographics of the U.S. are exactly the same as now; whether reflecting the ethnic tastes of the author or what he assumes his audience wants to hear I don't know, but this is an exceedingly vanilla universe. North Americans (four hundred years in the future!) are portrayed as heroic defenders of liberty, while the rest of the world is composed of power-mad bureaucracy lovers intent on ruining our lovely earth through insufficient fealty to right-libertarian extremist principles. Historical references are almost uniformly restricted to twentieth century U.S. military history or that of Great Britain (I guess the rest of humanity was just an unfortunate fad).

And that brings us to the fascistic bent of the author's work. The military is always exalted, attack and destruction are always the preferred (and correct) solutions. Military officers, who in the work of Douglas' and most everyone else in the field know best because their hearts are pure, should subvert elected officials if they don't agree with their decisions (dismantling democracy in order to save it). No scientist, no politician, no civilian can ever be so wise as a military man and are always rendered as subservient when we see them at all. In fact to look at Douglas' latest universe is to gain the impression there are no civilians; only the military and the dirty politicians. Everyone and everything else is but a footnote in the glorious annals of Confederation (I am truly amazed at how almost every interstellar human government in almost every military SF novel is called the "Confederation") naval history.

I've written enough. This book and its sequels are utterly boring, because they've been written a thousand times before. Only the names change.
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78 of 99 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars "Not all Muslims are fanatics, Lieutenant", April 16, 2010
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This book had a number of serious turn-offs for me: (1) the insipid political correctness reflected in the above quote (from page 152 and echoed in later pages); (2) the incredibly tough female fighter pilot who we've only seen in, gosh, about 300 previous books and movies; (3) the stock dialogue that we've also seen about 300 times before (for example, after the battle, at page 341: "We weren't going to let you have all the fun to yourselves.") (4) the psychiatric leave taken by the main character in the midst of a battle zone; and (5) the lack of any character who there was reason to care about.

That said, the battles have a number of strong points. If you've liked this author before, you will probably like him again here. For myself, I much prefer the "Dauntless" series by Jack Campbell.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars I didn't hate it..., March 6, 2012
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This review is from: Earth Strike: Star Carrier: Book One (Kindle Edition)
I'm a huge fan of military science fiction - of any military fiction really - but this book severely disappointed me. No, not because of the military aspect at all. That was really one of the few saving graces about this book that kept me reading until the end.

The characters were cookie cutter types. Admiral Koenig, while a major player in the plot - well I couldn't have a personal connection with the guy. He was just, there. And, I'm all for women heroes, tough chicks who kick butt, but Commander Allyn again was also just there. No real depth to her as a "person" she was just a fighter pilot and without the use of "she" I probably would have never noticed she was a woman honestly.

The only character (and saving grace #2) that had any depth, was Lieutenant Gray. While there were other saving graces to this story, he really was the main reason why I continued the read the book. I wanted to know what happened to him. Even with that, I still felt he could have been developed 'more'. After all, I have no idea what he looks like - at all.

If the characters were described in physical appearance at all during the story, I missed it due to the overwhelming details of the technology. Maybe I just prefer the "softer" types of sci-fi stories. Even still, I don't feel the need to take up multiple paragraphs and in some cases multiple pages, to explain to me how each individual type of ship, weapon, and tech works. And not only do that, but do it repeatedly for the same piece of equipment. The sad part was, not only was it repeated, it was repeated almost verbatim every time. The same words, in the same order.

The third and final saving grace of this story was the fight scenes. And if the over use and repetition of the technology during these scenes was taken out, they would be even better.

I didn't necessarily hate the story - the basic plot was a good one and the fight scenes kept me interested. I don't think I'll read any more books from this series though, as the over-detail and cookie cutter characters just don't make it worth my while to figure out what else happens in the series arc.
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21 of 26 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Earth Strike: Star Carrier: Book One, January 15, 2012
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This review is from: Earth Strike: Star Carrier: Book One (Kindle Edition)
This is terrible. It's been a long time since I've read a techno sci-fi book. This would not have made the cut 50 years ago. The book would be less than half as long if even a modestly competent editor had reviewed the manuscript. So many things, clever in and of themselves, were described over and over again in virtually identical words every time a gizmo or process was part of the action. Either the author didn't have confidence in his audience, was being paid by the word and needed to fill a quota, or just didn't care about craftsmanship. In this case, a modest number of pages, he could rely on his reader to remember, to take one of far too many examples, that it's dangerous to turn too fast when travelling at certain accelerations and why that's so. [When I decided to warn folks about this book, I decided it would only be fair if I finished the damned thing. I didn't go back to count the description of that turn or its ugly consequences if it's done too fast - you betcha, someone in Earth's fleet did it too fast and was eaten by his own personal singularity - but I'd guess the same five or six line description appeared at least half a dozen times.

On top of that, there wasn't a character worth remembering.

Thumbs way down on this one, way down. Makes you think the humans don't deserve to win, even if only temporarily. Of course I'll never know who wins because I won't be reading Books 2 and 3.Earth Strike: Star Carrier: Book One
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Serious shortcomings, January 4, 2013
By 
Johann Helgason (Reykjavik, Iceland) - See all my reviews
The author seems to repeat himself over and over. This story is a repeat of his previous stories on the same theme, only the names and enemy have been changed.
Rest is mostly copy paste.
The writer is obviously american former military with no respect for civilians or government. Only the military in his mind is capable of original thought and decency.
He repeats the same items over and over and spends alot of time going over what has happened before in earlier books. A critical editor could have shortened this 3 book series to 1 book by cutting out all the crap.

The storyline itself is ok, and the tech and background is decent, but all this is tainted by the authors bigotry in favor of the US military.
I do not recomend anyone paying for this
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good enough first book to make you want to read ..., July 5, 2014
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This review is from: Earth Strike: Star Carrier: Book One (Kindle Edition)
B to B+ series. Good enough first book to make you want to read the second and third - but get's tedious after that - pretty much the same thing over and over, so after book 4 - I gave up on the series. Better series of MilScfi out their then this.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Ho hum, February 18, 2014
By 
Kathleen Carroll "KMC" (Gettysburg, PA United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Earth Strike: Star Carrier: Book One (Kindle Edition)
This was my first story by this author. Military SciFi is a new genre for me and I usually love it. Truly, this book is awful. I can't comment of its redundancy (as respects the author's earlier work) but the character development was nonexistent - I didn't care about any of them and the aliens, who are supposed to be so technologically superior, as just stupid. I loved all the Honor Harrington books where the vilians were not idots and the characters far more fleshed out.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Author bends his world's rules to suit..., June 15, 2013
I must echo points made by other reviewers about this book, such as the lacking character development. The reader finds themselves not particularly caring about any of the point-of-view characters at all, except perhaps for the main character, and even then only a little bit. The rest of the characters in the book are such paper-thin, cliched, politically-correct, hackneyed portrayals of people that there's really no emotional impact when they die (and many of them die). Even the fighter pilot comrades of the main character are so thin and impersonal that the reader feels nothing when they inevitably meet their end.

I also found quite distracting was how the author too overtly seems to bend the rules of his world to achieve his own objectives for the story... for instance, shields seem to protect certain ships just fine for extended periods of heavy bombardment, and then another (doomed) ship doesn't seem to last long at all. There were also tactical inconsistencies as well, such as why would a small, destroyer-class ship apparently intentionally intercept and take two missile hits intended for a much larger, capital ship, with presumably far stronger and better shields, point defenses, and even the sand missile defense that is a large part of the story? If the capital ship had its shields down or was otherwise crippled, I could understand this, but it wasn't and was even apparently completely unscathed. If it was a sacrifice, then the danger needed to be shown, as otherwise it just looks like the senseless waste of a ship, and that makes us care even less about the people who died on it.

That being said... it was a light mil-sci-fi yarn that could be read in a day or two.
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