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Earth Strike: Star Carrier: Book One (Star Carrier Series) Mass Market Paperback – February 23, 2010


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Editorial Reviews

Review

"Douglas knows his SF." Publishers Weekly --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Back Cover

The first book in the epic saga of humankind's war of transcendence

There is a milestone in the evolution of every sentient race, a Tech Singularity Event, when the species achieves transcendence through its technological advances. Now the creatures known as humans are near this momentous turning point.

But an armed threat is approaching from deepest space, determined to prevent humankind from crossing over that boundary—by total annihilation if necessary.

To the Sh'daar, the driving technologies of transcendent change are anathema and must be obliterated from the universe—along with those who would employ them. As their great warships destroy everything in their path en route to the Sol system, the human Confederation government falls into dangerous disarray. There is but one hope, and it rests with a rogue Navy Admiral, commander of the kilometer-long star carrier America, as he leads his courageous fighters deep into enemy space towards humankind's greatest conflict—and quite possibly its last.

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Product Details

  • Series: Star Carrier Series (Book 1)
  • Mass Market Paperback: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Harper Voyager (February 23, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0061840254
  • ISBN-13: 978-0061840258
  • Product Dimensions: 4.2 x 0.9 x 6.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (209 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #73,395 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Ian Douglas, one of the many pseudonyms for writer William H. Keith, is the New York Times bestselling author of the popular military SF series The Heritage Trilogy, The Legacy Trilogy, The Inheritance Trilogy, and the ongoing Star Carrier and Star Corpsman series. A former naval corpsman, he lives in Pennsylvania.

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

392 of 420 people found the following review helpful By TheChief on February 28, 2010
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
A real page turner and entertaining read, however...

This author has done this storyline before. He is using almost identical plot lines and enemies as the previous stories. Heck, this story is set with a similar beginning as the last and in the same universe..The major change is a different enemy even they are also billion year old, galaxy-spanning, mega-bad-guys bent on the destruction of the human race. Hmm, sound like the Xul again.

I do enjoy the science though and will buy the next series. I just wish more effort was spent on creating a new universe and change of plot lines...

The plot lines in both series:

1. Politicians are idiots and only the military are smart enough to know what's best
2. Civilians are idiots and only the military are smart enough to know what's best
3. Civilians and politicians are proven wrong only after an attack on earth that kills billions
4. Only the Admiral/General of a battle group seems to have all the answers and no one listens to him
5. The billion year old enemy is too stupid or slow to use basic combat tactics or sensors and are constantly caught off guard by humans' creative genius

I wish the author would take note and put more effort into maturing the relationship dynamics between military, civilian, and politicos and NOT make them so stereo typical.

Enjoy
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94 of 101 people found the following review helpful By Damien Stewart on March 19, 2010
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
William H. Keith Jr. writes under several pseudonyms and I was surprised to discover that I have several of his other books from non-related genres. Having read all of the Heritage, Legacy, and most recent Inheritance Trilogies I was kind of disappointed that Earth Strike has a lot of carry over from those series in technology and plot structure. The book was entertaining but predictable and at times I'm sure I could find very similar passages from the previous nine books of those series. I just was expecting a little more but overall was satisfied enough to read it over a week or so. The last book of the Inheritance Trilogy I read in a single night the day it released as a comparison. So if you enjoyed other Ian Douglas books I'm sure you'll enjoy this one. I also plan on continuing to read the rest of the series as they are released.
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72 of 87 people found the following review helpful By Ben Wolf on May 14, 2013
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
Where to begin?

Unfortunately, as we have increasingly seen in the sub-genre of "military SF", techno-babble largely replaces art forms such as character development, dialogue and plot. One can hardly read a single paragraph without being barraged with a series of gee-whiz-how-amazing! numbers running out to the fifth decimal. Rather than understanding our protagonists (their flaws, their strengths, their contradictions), we are treated with dozens of pages devoted to how cool a drive system is, or how fast a missile can fly, or the size of a solar system. It's a cheap tactic which allows authors to skimp on the hard work that really makes a story engrossing. These characters exist only as vehicles for full-on technophilia.

As a result we're left with cookie-cutter SF superheroes and villains. You know the kind: military paragons of virtue concerned only with the most noble of ideals battling nasty, vain, self-serving politicians who want to crush freedom and liberty for all individuals. Douglas' characters are caricatures found in virtually every military SF novel to come out in the last twenty years, completely interchangeable. It's therefore no surprise that none of them ever give the sense of being real, nor is it ever possible to develop an emotional connection with them.

And when I say cookie-cutter, boy do I mean it. Our protagonists are white. Very white. Names like DuPont, Koening, Buchanan. Even four hundred years in the future the demographics of the U.S. are exactly the same as now; whether reflecting the ethnic tastes of the author or what he assumes his audience wants to hear I don't know, but this is an exceedingly vanilla universe. North Americans (four hundred years in the future!
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Anastasia Pergakis on March 6, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I'm a huge fan of military science fiction - of any military fiction really - but this book severely disappointed me. No, not because of the military aspect at all. That was really one of the few saving graces about this book that kept me reading until the end.

The characters were cookie cutter types. Admiral Koenig, while a major player in the plot - well I couldn't have a personal connection with the guy. He was just, there. And, I'm all for women heroes, tough chicks who kick butt, but Commander Allyn again was also just there. No real depth to her as a "person" she was just a fighter pilot and without the use of "she" I probably would have never noticed she was a woman honestly.

The only character (and saving grace #2) that had any depth, was Lieutenant Gray. While there were other saving graces to this story, he really was the main reason why I continued the read the book. I wanted to know what happened to him. Even with that, I still felt he could have been developed 'more'. After all, I have no idea what he looks like - at all.

If the characters were described in physical appearance at all during the story, I missed it due to the overwhelming details of the technology. Maybe I just prefer the "softer" types of sci-fi stories. Even still, I don't feel the need to take up multiple paragraphs and in some cases multiple pages, to explain to me how each individual type of ship, weapon, and tech works. And not only do that, but do it repeatedly for the same piece of equipment. The sad part was, not only was it repeated, it was repeated almost verbatim every time. The same words, in the same order.

The third and final saving grace of this story was the fight scenes.
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