Earthly Delights

October 13, 2009 | Format: MP3

$8.91
Also available in CD Format
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4:52
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6:09
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7:14
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4:26
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4:21
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5:39
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2:13
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12:20
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: October 13, 2009
  • Release Date: October 13, 2009
  • Label: Load Records
  • Copyright: 2009, Load Records
  • Total Length: 50:54
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B002N8Q2WC
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #138,796 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

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4 star
43%
3 star
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By p-51 on October 20, 2009
Format: MP3 Music
The Onion's AV Club website has a music review section that I like to peruse from time to time. Normally, I'm bored senseless with their usual review fodder, which seems to overwhelmingly favor the shoe-gazing alt-pop genre. You know what I'm talking about: the hushed and whiny lead singer mumbles delicate lyrics about love and loss while sloppily playing an acoustic guitar.

Recently, they awarded an 'A' rating to a band I'd never heard before, a band consisting solely of a drummer and a bass player, a band named Lightning Bolt. Intrigued, I listened to a sample of "Sound Guardians." At first, it sounded to me like a cageful of chimpanzees beating the holy smokes out of a couple instruments - just a solid wall of noise with no rhyme or reason.

Just as I was about to turn it off in disgust, the song reached out and grabbed me, and it wouldn't let me go. Feverishly, I listened to the rest of the album, and was simply floored by the mad energy and insane structure that each song dished up.

And to me, that's really what this album is all about: pure energy, barely contained, fed through 18 levels of distortion, and presented for your enjoyment. No virtuoso performances are to be found here, just powerful chunks of sound and fury.

Not every song is a masterpiece. In my opinion, "Flooded Chamber" is kind of a muddled mess. "S.O.S." tries awfully hard to rock out, but ends up more cacophonous than anything. But the rest of the songs are out of this world.

Of course, this won't be to everyone's tastes. Most of the people I've demo'd tracks to have been of the opinion that it's the pinnacle of terrible. But what do they know?
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Wheelchair Assassin on December 3, 2009
Format: Audio CD
As a pure sonic experience, there's little out there right now that can match a Lightning Bolt album, and the unrelenting drum-and-bass attack of their latest should be enough to induce spasms of pleasure even for those well versed in music of the noisy and confrontational variety. Unrestrained by any need for old-fashioned devices like guitars, choruses, melody, or intelligible vocals, Lightning Bolt's sound is a gloriously destructive and primal blend of avant-garde craziness, head-spinning technical proficiency, and overwhelming fury, and Earthly Delights is quite probably their most ambitious release to date. At times it's fast, complex, and heavy enough to make heads spin (if not outright explode), but it always manages to sound spontaneous and inspired rather than joyless or mechanical. Earthly Delights is the sound of a band pushing its limits and having fun doing it, making even such classic earlier releases as Ride The Skies and Wonderful Rainbow sound like mere warm-ups for the awe-inspiring madness on display here.

While its sheer intensity would be enough to make Earthly Delights an entertaining album, it's the dazzling musicianship and seemingly telepathic connection between the band's two members that makes it a great one. Brian Chippendale's speed and endurance in annihilating his drum kit border on superhuman, with his performance on some tracks sounding more like an extended solo than mere backing rhythm work. For his part, Brian Gibson`s bass gets more mileage out of four strings than most guitarists could get out of six, favoring reverberating, elastic riffs and bouts of piercing feedback over the metronomic thumping that so often characterizes the instrument.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By D. K. Malone on April 16, 2010
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I loved Ride The Skies. I loved Wonderful Rainbow. I did not love Hypermagic Mountain. Of its 12 songs, I only liked two. Actually, more like one and a half. I liked the first song, and the second half of the seventh song. Everything else on the record sounded like neanderthals using jawbones to beat on tapir carcasses, completely lacking the playfulness and musical wit that made me a fan of these guys in the first place. I thought so, anyway. But I love Earthly Delights. Pounding, crushing, dazzling, mirthful, louder-than-Hell noise rock. Maybe not quite as awesome as Skies and Rainbow... but still awesome.
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By J KRAK on June 27, 2010
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Lightning Bolt continues to get the job done, when it comes to an all out "ear assault"! Earthly Delights introduces a unique album that is not quite as Metal as say, Hypermagic Mountain. The continued use of Brian Gibsons uniquely strung bass guitars add to the album. With a bit more high, the sounds are fresh and full. Sounds of Persian or indian style "sitar", dominate a section of this album. Brian Chippendale continues his percussion assault which makes you want to absorb it all in live! Another fine album full of heavy tunes, "not for the faint of heart"!
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