Qty:1
  • List Price: $19.00
  • Save: $2.18 (11%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: Used, but looks brand new. Only very slight signs of use. Cover and binding are undamaged, and pages are crisp and unmarked. Fast shipping from Amazon, and unbeatable customer service. Amazon Prime customers get free 2-day shipping. Millions of satisfied customers!
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Eat Me Paperback – April 13, 1998


See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$16.82
$0.88 $0.01


Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Broadway Books; Reprint edition (April 13, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0767901592
  • ISBN-13: 978-0767901598
  • Product Dimensions: 0.7 x 5.5 x 8.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (32 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,463,612 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

Bound to be controversial, this debut novel from a young Australian writer features four women friends discussing their sex lives and fantasies in frank detail. In doing so, they raise such issues as the difference between pornography and erotica, the role of gender politics in society, and what constitutes feminism. Along the way, Jaivin also manages to puncture many literary and critical pretensions. Her writing is often funny and satiric, and by layering stories she keeps the reader guessing about what is "real" and what is fantasy. Still, while some readers might enjoy the humor, off-beat characters, and discussions of social trends, others will be shocked and offended by the explicit language and descriptions of what might be perceived as bizarre sexual acts. A possibility for adventurous general readers and some women's studies collections, but purchase with caution.
-?Barbara E. Kemp, SUNY at Albany Libs.
Copyright 1997 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Kirkus Reviews

Combine a saucy, Waiting to Exhale sort of girl-gossip tone with Vox's lusty sexuality and you get this witty, sophisticated (if unfortunately titled) tale of four Australian women friends' amatory peccadillos. Julia, a photographer, adores younger men--even if they do exhibit a frustrating refusal to commit. Helen, a ``whole-grain loaf'' of a lit professor, can whip up a salacious fantasy about any man despite her feminist politics and anxiety about her weight. Chantal, the anoretic fashion editor of a style magazine, prefers the safety of gay men to the arrogant hetero poseurs she's met in the past. And Philippa, a self-defined lesbian and voyeur, claims she keeps herself sexually satisfied by committing her erotic fantasies to paper. Meeting at Sydney's Caf‚ Da Vida, these four high-powered women, all in their early 30s, relish exchanging reports of exceptional one-night stands, libidinous fantasies, shocking past encounters, and erotic schemes for the future. As Chantal recalls her student/mentor S&M relationship with a now- renowned poet and fends off drooling fellow espresso drinkers at the caf‚, Julia tells of seducing a dreadlocked 21-year-old, then flying off to China, where she's ravished in a park by a local contortionist and snake-charmer. Helen captivates her friends with an impossibly lush and funny fantasy of a seaside encounter with Rambo, then stuns them with the re-creation of a tryst with a truck driver. What these three women don't realize as they chat over their cappuccino is that quiet Philippa is taking mental notes, and that their secrets will soon appear in ``fictionalized'' form in a novel entitled Eat Me. Philippa is soon forgiven, though, as her friends note that she's as generous in print with her own past as with theirs. Already a bestseller in its native Australia (the author was raised in Connecticut but works as a freelance journalist in Sydney), this tossed salad of erotic scenarios charms as few examples of its genre ever have. ($50,000 ad/promo; author tour) -- Copyright ©1997, Kirkus Associates, LP. All rights reserved. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

I did not enjoy any of the characters.
CLP
Highly recommended, always entertaining, with the focus on four very different friends, sex, food, and other adventures...with quite a twist thrown in at the end.
swtnsassy@aol.com
Although this book is about two of my favorite things--food and sex--it was a little hard to swallow, for lack of a better term.
"admiralkatt"

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By "kathrynlively" on February 29, 2000
Format: Paperback
As far as commercial erotica goes, journalist and scholar Linda Jaivin's debut novel Eat Me is a unique excursion into the world of sensual tastes. It's 9 1/2 Weeks in a supermarket, an uninhibited look into the joys of calorie-laden, chocolate-coated ecstasy direct from the Land Down Under.
Unlike the array of gothic, violent erotic fiction that seems to be crowded shelves these days, Eat Me is upbeat, at time hilarious (a letter-switching incident comes to mind) and baffling (you'll never watch David Letterman the same way again, I guarantee it). Jaivin writes a playful, sexy novel hotter than jalepeno and as smooth as French Silk pie. Jaivin takes the eroticism of food to a new level with Eat Me and is certain to leave many mouths watering.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By C. A Scovel VINE VOICE on January 2, 2002
Format: Paperback
This is a very entertaining story about a young female writer. She is writing erotica for woman and basing most of it on her friends. This story takes you through the lives of a number of thirty something lady with very active imaginations as well as sex lives. A laugh a minute - and don't let the first chapter freak you out. I was wondering what in the hell I had bought when I read it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By CoffeeGurl HALL OF FAME on February 2, 2003
Format: Paperback
Eat Me isn't your typical women's erotica -- it is a novel full of intelligent dialogue and sharp wit. The novel's about four friends from Sydney -- Phillipa, Helen, Julia and Chantal -- who get together to dish out juicy details of their latest romantic exploits. The stories are rather explicit and sensuous. However, will they continue to open up about their fantasies and exquisite tales when Phillipa tells them that she's writing an erotic novel?
Eat Me is like the forbidden fruit -- impossible to resist. This is one of the most original novels I have read in a long time. The vignettes within the novel are provocative and steamy. Jaivin is a wonderful writer of said genre and I look forward to reading more of her work...
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 17 people found the following review helpful By "admiralkatt" on February 23, 2000
Format: Paperback
Although this book is about two of my favorite things--food and sex--it was a little hard to swallow, for lack of a better term. The opening chapter is well-written and sexy, but the book falls apart soon after.
The main characters are four women who eat food, have sex, and do little else worth mentioning. They're interchangable, forgettable variations on one another, and Jaivin's attempt to emphasize each one as she goes about her business inevitably chops what could be a good novel into a collection of erotic vignettes and dialogues, with a whole lot of filler in between.
Is there a plot? After reading it once, I'm not sure, and in all honesty I'm not inclined to go back and find out.
It's sexy at times, and it's funny at times, and Jaivin clearly has potential. But the book, neither memorable nor believable, misses its mark. Although not quite nauseating, "Eat Me" is unappetizing, a bit rough on the digestive system, and nutritionally void.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 20, 2003
Format: Paperback
This was the first real erotica I read and it was fun, funny, and sexy. A great book to start with. I've lent it to several of my friends that are shy about reading erotica and everyone loves it. It has a bit of a story..and feels just one little sexy step up from a novel.
I love the cover too...the papaya is so fitting. And the title is as well...
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on August 25, 2000
Format: Paperback
The four female friends that are the backbone of this history do have different personalities and well as sexual preferences. We have a chubby feminist who is not sure if its attitude towards life is the logical and clear consequence of its rational positions or simply departs from the fact that she is not " too hot" so she stands a little chance to be noticed by men. We also have the dissipated artist afraid of aging but have a taste for younger guys who paradoxically exacerbates her insecurities. A bisexual writer of erotic fiction who could be our writer, and the chic, fancy, gorgeous editor of a woman's fashion magazine who is sort of bored with the lack of elegance of its male counterparts.
All our heroines are involved in funny stories and to some degree the author makes the effort to connect the separate events of the plot, so that it could be called a novel. But suddenly in the last thirty pages of the book she decides to jump into mixture of half told stories resulting in an ending lacks any real coherence and becomes like the summary a bunch of Penthouse® Forum® stories. This clumsy ending leaves ample ground to question the novelist capacity of Ms. Jaivin.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Robert Beveridge HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on December 13, 2006
Format: Hardcover
Linda Jaivin, Eat Me (Broadway, 1997)

I once defined chick lit as small green squares which lose their flavor in a remarkably small amount of time, and should then be spit out. Why do I continue trying to read this stuff? Your guess is as good as mine. In any case, Eat Me fits the general definition quite nicely.

This is the story of four Australian thirtysomething women who spend most of their free time eating, having sex, thinking about food, thinking about having sex, or some combination of the above. While this generally makes for amusing novels from a company like Beeline, it doesn't make for engrossing mainstream lit. If you combine the Lifetime network with the Playboy channel, someone might manage to get a TV adaptation of this going, and it would fit right in with the general level of intelligence, depth, and complexity found in the movies broadcast by both, but if you're looking for a book to sink your teeth into, look elsewhere. On the other hand, if you're looking for shallow, gratuitous sex with a bit of food writing on the side, you may find this a perfect way to kill a few hours. **
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Search