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Eat Tweet: 1,020 Recipe Gems from the Twitter Community's @cookbook Paperback – September 16, 2010


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Artisan; English Language edition (September 16, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1579654266
  • ISBN-13: 978-1579654269
  • Product Dimensions: 6.3 x 5 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,743,589 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Maureen Evans is a prolific amateur cook and traveler who tweets recipes from around the world to her thousands of followers on Twitter. When not cooking or tweeting, this Canadian native can be found studying for her master's in creative writing at Queen's University, Belfast. She lives with her partner, Blaine Cook, who was the lead programmer on Twitter.



More About the Author

Maureen Evans (or @cookbook, as she is known on Twitter) is a prolific amateur cook and traveler who tweets recipes daily to her thousands of followers, who often tweet their own recipes back. A native of British Columbia, she recently earned a graduate degree in creative writing from Queen's University, Belfast. She lives with her partner, Blaine Cook, who was the original programmer on Twitter.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Rabble on October 31, 2010
Format: Paperback
I got a copy of this book as a gift. It's great, i like twitter, and thinking about how to be concise.

The author has taken recipes, lots of them, over 1000, and wrote them in the shortest form possible. I thought it'd be hard to decode, figure out how to translate the short hand in to food on the table. There's a guide, but i didn't need it.

There's a game you can do with it, pick a recipe you have no idea what it'll look like, follow the discussions, and cook it. Then compare the food as you eat it with the wikipedia page about the dish.

Eat Tweet's a great gift for the tech savvy chef.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Brian Connors VINE VOICE on December 4, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I saw this book in Urban Outfitters and I immediately wondered: is this complete pop culture insanity or certified genius?

Maureen Evans had an advantage over most people to come up with something like this, being the girlfriend of Twitter developer Blaine Cook, but I'm not sure that really matters so much as the potential of the extreme dialect of txt_spk she developed for her @cookbook project. The remarkable level of information density she pulls off (including translations of such classics as Julia Child's boeuf bourgignon and Jim Lahey's no-knead bread) is a gift to recipe exchangers -- rather than relying on email or redirect services, a quick-on-the-draw cook can send a favorite recipe by text message. I have a couple of quibbles -- some of the terms she uses aren't quite as abbreviated as they could be, and the use of fraction glyphs is problematic for any application that doesn't support Unicode (unfortunately, notation this dense isn't very metric-friendly) -- but for the most part Evans has created something with some real value for amateur cooks.

However, though the real star of this book is the notation, what might get lost in the novelty of it all is this: this is actually a pretty solid general kitchen cookbook. There's over a thousand recipes crammed into the ~260 pages of the book, and they cover a satisfyingly broad, strongly international selection of just the basics. Although it's perhaps a bit more for an advanced cook than, say, Joy of Cooking, it's both inexpensive and reasonably comprehensive. The notation takes a bit of getting used to, but the glossary is comprehensive and there's plenty of (plain English) notes to help you through.
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Format: Paperback
I never got the point of Twitter until I saw my first recipe. What a great idea, and done well by Ms. Evans.

There is exactly as much information here as any good cook needs, and no more. That said, it is obviously not a book for beginners, who might not be able to decypher things like "T" and "t" (tablespoon and teaspoon), and would likely be lost with something like "Beat2lb flank8x10."

As some of the other reviewers have pointed out, the use of Unicode fractions (like "⅓c crm& ½t fresh nutmeg") means that they sometimes don't print well. I write recipes, have now started including Twitter versions of them, and I find it MUCH easier (and more compact) to list ingredients (and measure) by weight, in grams.
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