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Eat Your Peas: A Daisy Book Hardcover – February 1, 2006


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Hardcover, February 1, 2006
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 3 - 6 years
  • Grade Level: Preschool - 1
  • Hardcover: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Harry N. Abrams (February 1, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0810959747
  • ISBN-13: 978-0810959743
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 8.4 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,465,726 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

It's dinnertime and Daisy knows what her mom is going to say even before she says it. "Eat your peas." Looking down at "the little green balls that were ganging up on her plate," Daisy says, "I don't like peas." And round one of the eternal pea battle has begun. Daisy's mother skips over the cajoling, begging, ordering phase, and jumps straight into barter mode. "If you eat your peas, you can have a dish of ice cream." Ha! We laugh at Mom's naiveté. No, Daisy won't settle for a simple dish of ice cream. The bargaining quickly escalates. Soon her subtly shrinking mother is promising 48 dishes of ice cream, permission to stay up past midnight, a reprieve from ever having to wash again, two new bikes, and a baby elephant. And still the ever-bigger Daisy responds, "I don't like peas."

No question about it: this story will strike a chord with more than a few young readers and their long-suffering parents. Daisy's ultimate comeback will tickle readers of all ages, as she challenges her mother's own aversion to brussels sprouts. Nick Sharratt's crisp bright images of the gradually shifting power at the table are pleasing in their cartoon-like simplicity. Parents will want to keep a copy of this by the kitchen table to lighten up the often tense, wearying mealtime clash. (Ages 3 to 7) --Emilie Coulter --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly

What will it take to get Daisy to eat her peas? Mom starts out with a bribe of ice cream. But even when she cumulatively ups the ante to an inducement that includes never having to go to school again and the purchase of 92 chocolate factories (each clearly delineated in the illustrations), Daisy is unyielding. What the girl really wants is tit-for-tat: "I'll eat my peas if you eat your brussels sprouts," she tells Mom, whose lip promptly begins to quiver at the prospect. A few pages later, daughter and mom are enjoying bowls of ice cream, but it's unclear whether both bit the bullet, nutritionally speaking, or whether they dispensed with veggies and opted for immediate gratification. That nagging ambiguity aside, the book may well tickle funny bones (even if kids may question why Daisy wouldn't trade a few veggies for the bounty her mother offers), thanks not only to debut author Gray's escalating silliness, but also Sharratt's (The Animal Orchestra) signature bold graphics. Daisy, with her perfectly round face, determined, beady eyes and severe Joan of Arc coif, is a veritable icon of juvenile intransigence. Ages 3-6. (Sept.)
Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

A fun book with bright, simple illustrations that will keep kids interested.
E. B. Glass
I won't go as far as the other 1-star review to say that it's super-colonialist (though perhaps it is)... But the book is just garbage.
Oakland Citizen
She is almost 4 years old now and can read the book all by herself word for word.
Mandy Marshall

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Kelly Mcelwain on February 6, 2008
Format: Hardcover
This adorable book shows the lengths a well-meaning mom says she'll go to in order to get her daughter to eat her peas. Every parent has struggled with a child not wanting to eat what is in front of her/him; my youngest refuses to touch peas or anything green. The point is that the mom offers more and more outrageous bribes to get Daisy to do what she wants -something that kids find humorous whether or not their parents have ever done it. When Daisy points out that her mom doesn't have to eat food she truly dislikes, it's "kid-logic" at its best. (I haven't eaten lima bean since my parents forced me to as a child; I don't force my kids to eat anything. There's always another choice!) But food isn't even the point of the book.

A previous reviewer decried the book as racist, even saying it should be recalled; read the book to see the context. After offering pet elephants and zebras, chocolate factories and 100 dishes of ice cream, the mom offers to buy Africa and a supermarket. Africa is, of course, home to elephants and zebras, and the supermarket is home to ice cream. As adults, we sometimes see things not as they are, but with our own perspective tarnishing the intention of the author. There is no hidden message of colonialism or racism. And what's wrong with a little personal choice? Can't I serve more than one vegetable at a time?

The book is sweet, funny, and a good lesson to the adults - we can't make them eat, sleep, or poop, but we sure can have fun with our kids! My daughters adore this book, and have loved it since we first opened it when the oldest wasn't even two. She's now six and reads it to the younger ones! And now I am off to serve broccoli to all but the youngest, who will have carrots instead. Then they'll have leftover cake.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By KB Linderman on September 25, 2006
Format: Hardcover
This is a great book. My daughter loves it because it's fun and funny and silly. We checked it out of the library, and she loved it so much, I bought her her own copy. In the context of the book, the idea of buying the child Africa is representative of the lengths to which the mother will go to get the child to eat her peas. It is, and is meant to be, a completely ridiculous concept. In fact, I believe that after the mother promises to buy Africa, she promises to buy the child the earth, the moon and the sun, as well. She also promises that she never has to bathe or dress herself, go to school, or clean her room again. I mean - the whole idea of the book is preposterous. That's what makes it FUN!

My daughter's response to the "I'll buy you Africa" part the first time I read it to her was to ask what Africa is and where it is. The idea that this portion of the book is "colonialist" and "racist" is absolutely laughable. The problem with some parents is that they've forgotten what it's like to be a child. This book is imaginative and fun - in no way is it anything but a positive and fun reading experience for any child - with the right kind of delivery, of course. Get a sense of humor.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Amy Torres on October 27, 2006
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book has been a favorite in our home for 6 or 7 years, when I purchased the book through a DK home sales company. I would take it to read to my daughter's classes and was so popular that I found an out of print copy and donated it to the school library. You can never find it on the shelf there; it is always checked out. I recently ordered a second copy to supplement the first and realize that the text is slightly different... "ice cream" has been changed to "dessert" although the picture is the same. It's a bit small now for a read-aloud; the first copy will have to be reserved when I want to read it to the students. The children love how the mom spirals out of control in an attempt to convince her daughter to eat her peas. "Oh, I'd eat my peas if I got to move to Superland." What a riot! Note to publishers: print this in a big-book format!
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By Jenny on September 27, 2006
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
We received this book as a gift from a friend in England. My 2-year-old LOVES it. As the other reviewer mentioned, it is exaggerated and ridiculous, and kids understand that. Some of the concepts and word usages are very English, including the reference to "Superland," the use of the word "pudding" (which means dessert in England), and the reference to buying Africa. There Africa is a cool place to visit with cool animals, bigger than Superland and smaller than the earth (the next thing she offers to buy). I can understand how that sentence might be misinterpreted, but please don't write off this book because of it. It is too much fun. We have several other Daisy books, including "You Do," "Really, Really" and "A Bunch of Daisies" and all are wonderful.
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By Chickens on Hickin on November 25, 2010
Format: Hardcover
I cannot believe that we have come to this. Seriously? This is a book written for children highlighting the message that "if it doesn't feel good, you don't have to do it." Teaching children to do things that are good for them even though they aren't pleasant (eating right, exercising, studying, being respectful) is a lost art in our society and this book just shows it in a few pages. I don't think I will encourage my children to have this type of attitude.

And yes, the exaggerations are outlandish and silly, but I would have to wonder how the mother will deal with these empty promises in the future. Very disappointing.
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