Prime Music
Qty:1
& FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
Only 9 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Eat at Whitey's has been added to your Cart
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Item in very good condition ready to ship!! Guaranteed to play!! All Day Low Prices!
Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Cart
$13.40
& FREE Shipping on orders over $35.00. Details
Sold by: cdgiveaways
Add to Cart
$19.95
& FREE Shipping on orders over $35.00. Details
Sold by: MEGA Media
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Color:
  • Eat at Whitey's
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
  • To view this video download Flash Player
      

Eat at Whitey's


See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Listen Instantly with Prime Music Album
Other Formats & Versions Amazon Price New from Used from
Audio CD, October 17, 2000
"Please retry"
$13.58
$5.07 $0.01
$13.58 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details Only 9 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Amazon's Everlast Store

Music

Image of album by Everlast

Photos

Image of Everlast

Biography

Erik “Everlast” Schrody didn’t particularly want to be a rapper. As a teenage graffiti writer in LA in the late ‘80s, Everlast started rapping to entertain his homeboys. It didn’t take too long for them to see he was talented.
“I was just rapping for fun, just to tell jokes,” he says. “And then they just encouraged me to do it. Some of them ... Read more in Amazon's Everlast Store

Visit Amazon's Everlast Store
for 24 albums, 7 photos, and 1 full streaming song.


Frequently Bought Together

Eat at Whitey's + Whitey Ford Sings the Blues + White Trash Beautiful
Price for all three: $40.30

Buy the selected items together


Product Details

  • Audio CD (October 17, 2000)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Rhino / Ada
  • ASIN: B00004XSI1
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (79 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #49,288 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Whitey
2. Black Jesus
3. I Can't Move
4. Black Coffee - featuring Merry Clayton
5. Babylon Feeling - featuring Carlos Santana
6. Deadly Assassins - featuring B-Real
7. Children's Story - featuring Rahzel
8. Love For Real - featuring N'Dea Davenport
9. One and the Same - featuring N'Dea Davenport
10. We're All Gonna Die - featuring Cee-Lo
11. Mercy On My Soul
12. One, Two - featuring Kurupt
13. Graves to Dig

Editorial Reviews

Product Description

Amazon.com

Everlast continues defying the odds with his sophomore CD. The former House of Pain frontman and Ice-T sidekick defied the odds in 1998 with the chart-topping Whitey Ford Sings the Blues, which moved Everlast beyond his rap roots and deep into a spare, acoustic amalgam of Delta blues, country, and rock--an approach that took critics and fans by storm. Eat at Whitey's finds him beefing up his sound as well as bringing in big names, such as N'dea Davenport (who adds her always welcome vocals on the sexy, R&B-flavored "Love for Real"), Goodie Mob's Cee-Lo, Cypress Hill's B Real, and Carlos Santana, for whom Everlast penned the Grammy-winning "Put Your Lights On." Everlast is still fixated on redemption and regret, but his intensity and passion make up for the narrow focus, as, guitar in hand, he conjures up a nocturnal, sultry world populated with saints, sinners, and homeboys. --Amy Linden

Customer Reviews

Everlast takes his style to a new level without changing the quality of the music.
PJ Straub
People who really appreciate when an artist puts everything into an album can tell that Everlast has been getting closer to that as he goes.
Ben Stuble
His first album has some good beats, and makes you move, but this album is a more emotional album with great lyrics, and nice music.
Zach

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Kindle Customer on February 6, 2001
Format: Audio CD
In the interest of full disclosure, let me say that this is only the second rap record I've ever bought, the first being Everlast's "Whitey Ford Sings the Blues." I'm a 47-year-old rock fan who grew up on the Stones, Cream, and Hendrix, and know very little about hip-hop. I heard of Everlast through his guest spot on Santana's album, and after seeing him open for Santana, decided to try one of his records.
That said, this is one of the most enjoyable new albums I've come across in years. I literally can't get enough of it, and have gone so far as to buy a second copy, so I can have it available in the car as well as at home.
True, this is mostly a rock record. The tracks "I Can't Move," "Black Coffee", "Babylon Feeling" and "Graves to Dig" are worth the purchase price, featuring lush arrangements, great lyrics, and powerful themes.
Having been drawn in by the songs, I've discovered at my advanced age that there's a lot to be said for driving down the highway with some thundering rap vibrating the windows and annoying neighbors.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By 3rdeadly3rd on March 3, 2001
Format: Audio CD
For some people, this would count as Everlast's "difficult second album" regardless of the accuracy of such a statement ("Forever Everlasting" was his debut solo album, making this his 3rd). But, there have not been many albums in the 90s which are so focussed and perceptive as this one.
Everlast would appear, on the surface at least, to have jumped on the "let's try some odd combinations and see if they work" bandwagon which seems to be taking a lot of the music world by storm (Wyclef, I am looking in your direction). Not that this is a bad thing, but there's only so much that can be got out of it.
On closer listening, the album reveals the first of its many secrets. The apparently random nature of the guests is actually organised so that Everlast can demonstrate his own skills in performing many different styles.
All the tracks on this album are moving in some way or another - maybe not on first listening, but after you've got past some of the symbolism you'll beging to feel very emotional at most of them.
"Black Jesus" - Everlast singing what sounds like a very old blues song with modern lyrics ("Bloods keep bloodin'/Crips keep crippin'") while playing an acoustic guitar - may have been the lead off single but isn't the strongest track on the album, despite the power invested in the lyrics by Everlast's deep growl.
The better tracks here seem to be the quieter, reflective tracks. "I Can't Move", "Love For Real", "Babylon Feeling" and "Black Coffee" all have the effect of making the listener stop and take stock of the situation. "Graves To Dig" is another track in this vein but the abstract nature of the lyrics creates a feeling more of fright rather than anything else.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By "dacerberuz" on December 28, 2000
Format: Audio CD
Amazing cd, a hard-core rapper turned rock musician, his opening flow says it, "think i stopped rhyming, because I started singing, picking on a six string wrist bling blinging". It was nice to see someone take the time and write a meaningful lyric, he experiments with new sounds adding violins on some tracks and a noticeable harp on "graves to dig". Its got a folk feel mixed with hip hop attitude. This is one of the best cd's of the year, it is noticeable that he took his time to create each track, and our ears are the beneficiaries. Until this cd, I had never heard a bassline hit with a violin stringing in the back, great cd, If you are tired of hearing meaningless rock/rappers spit then pick up everlast and join in the passion every track has.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By "maadtracker" on December 9, 2000
Format: Audio CD
Here is the truth: Everlast is not that great of a guitar player, not that great of a singer, not that great of a songwriter and not that great of a rapper. Yet, you still have to respect what the man is doing. Putting all he knows in a blender and letting you see what it is. Of course, the Santana track is going to definitely stand out, but each song kind of wanes, lyrically, after the first verse and hook. I normally wouldn't give a record three stars with so many holes in it, but I'll give it to Everlast on shear creativeness.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By "zero606" on November 5, 2000
Format: Audio CD
Everlast is still rockin, in his own unique way. The folk raprock has more of a rock edge this time around than previously. This is still definitely a worthy followup to Whitey Ford Sings the Blues. The production is much more interesting this time around. From the drum n bass interlude (!) to "Babylon Feeling," to the simplistic "Black Coffee," to the well layered anti-violence anthem "Graves to Dig," the production shimmers with both beautiful guitar tone and Radiohead-esque overtones. A great album.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Absolut King on August 2, 2002
Format: Audio CD
Very few albums stay in my CD player years after their release. But Everlast's last 2 albums are in my top 5 albums that I've ever bought. While Eat at Whitey's has not come anywhere near the commercial success that Whitey Ford Sings the Blues did 2 years before it, it is easily just as good, if not better.
Eat at Whitey's is a very experimental album for Everlast. Maybe he heard the cries from many of the people who bought WFSTB after hearing What It's Like, who thought they were scammed because the majority of it was a hip hop album. Eat at Whitey's relies mostly on Erik's incredibly unique singing voice, rather than his rapping. He's much more comfortable with his voice this time around as he shows on Black Jesus and Black Coffee. Instead of the somewhat monotonous singing tone that he displayed on many of the blues songs on WFSTB, he sings with much more emotion that keeps you hanging on every word.
There are no bad songs on the album, but there are a couple that are a notch below the rest of this spectacular album. Deadly Assassins uses a very generic beat from the usually stellar Alchemist, and the lyrics by Ev and B-Real suffer because of it. One, Two is not a bad song, but once again is brought down a bit by an average beat and average lyrics from Everlast and Kurupt. Unlike WFSTB, the hip hop songs don't match the quality of the songs that Everlast sings on.
All in all, Eat at Whitey's will keep you satisfied for a long time. Songs like I Can't Move, Love For Real, Black Jesus and Graves to Dig will have you in awe at Everlast's songwriting versatility. This album is definitely the most under appreciated album of 2000.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?