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Eaten Alive!: Italian Cannibal and Zombie Movies Paperback – September 30, 2002


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Paperback, September 30, 2002
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Plexus Publishing (September 30, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0859653145
  • ISBN-13: 978-0859653145
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.7 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,049,182 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

EATEN ALIVE should be in any GORE hounds house this book really is fascinating on the Italian GORE genre.
CLINT BRONSON
Just expect Mike Nelson's Movie Megacheese instead of Four Senses of Dante Alighieri in Film, and you're liable to enjoy it much more. ***
Robert Beveridge
Loads of great scans of original poster artwork of classics like Anthropophagus The Beast, Zombie Holocaust, Zombie Flesh Eaters, etc.
Alexander Stroud

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Carlos G. Diaz on October 28, 2002
Format: Paperback
Cannibal and Zombie films are a unique genre in horror film making as both are American influenced yet it took a few inventive and often times plagiaristic Italian producers to push the genres to the extreme. Eaten Alive is a collection of these films with informative reviews by the author Jay Slater. The book explores the early films of Italian directors such as Mario Bava and Jess Franco and how American director George Romero's Dawn of the Dead would influence the magnum opus of the genre Zombie Flesh Eaters. Classic shockers such as Cannibal Holocaust and Cannibal Ferox are included as well as lesser known yet equally gruesome films by Lucio Fulci, Umberto Lenzi and Michele Soavi . Included are exclusive interviews with the directors and actors who brought life to these films as well as hundreds of films stills. The perfect book for those who wish to explore the most extreme of films from the Masters of the Cannibal and Zombie Menace.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 17, 2002
Format: Paperback
Finally, somewhat of a definitive study on Italian exploitation films. Bravo! This has reviews and sometimes interviews of all the zombie and cannibal films ever made in Italy. I'm a diehard fan of horror, and especially like the Italians ones, that were generally more graphic than their American counterparts. The writers often acknowledge that the films are bad. My favorite actor, Giovanni Lombardo Radice is now ashamed to have been a part of such films and pities their fans. I find it ironic he would pan his only claim to fame. I love how Giovanni hams it up, and the animal cruelty he shuns. That's part of their appeal- they're so wacky and over the top, you can't help but love them. There are many posters from the films to spice it up. I got this for a college project, and it helped out big time. The clerks where I ordered it from noted the gross cover art. Slater and company really outdid themselves with this book. If you're a fan of Italian exploitation, look no further.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Matthew Mclaughlin on December 27, 2003
Format: Paperback
...I devoured this book in a single afternoon. The reviews on the 'important' films in the genre are extensive and honest, and while there were a few films that I wish had more coverage, that is just the tiniest gripe when, actually, I am so grateful for all the information that was packed between the covers. The way I see it, there is no way I'll ever be able to track down each of these titles, so being able to read about them - as well as fit them snugly into the history of the genre, regardless of how small their impact might have been - is a wonderful treat.
The classics (The Fulci films especially, and Cannibal Holocaust)each are covered well, and the cross-referencing of films and authors throughout is great, as are the overviews of zombie cinema given at the beginning of the book.
Eaten Alive is for completists and those interested in delving into the strange world of Italian Splatter alike. I highly recommend this. Keep Shambling!
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Robert Beveridge HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on March 31, 2005
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Jay Slater, Eaten Alive!: Italian Cannibal and Zombie Movies (Plexus, 2002)

I was hoping, in Eaten Alive!, for a real critical study of the cannibal and zombie subgenres of Italian horror in the late seventies and early eighties. That's not what I got. Instead, it's a list, with reviews of the films by various folks (mostly Slater himself, but with guest reviewers of some stature as well, e.g. David J. Schow) and a few interview pieces with various cast and crew on various films.

For what it is, it's a good enough book. Slater obviously has quite a comprehensive video collection, and there's probably at least one flick in here you've never heard of, no matter how well-versed you are in the genre (I'd heard of about ninety percent of them before reading this, and I've been well-versed in the genre since... well, I remember seeing the original TV trailer for Fulci's Zombie, if that tells you anything). Just expect Mike Nelson's Movie Megacheese instead of Four Senses of Dante Alighieri in Film, and you're liable to enjoy it much more. ***
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6 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 24, 2002
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
...
This book effectively catalogs the Italian cannibal/zombie genre from its beginnings in the early 60's through the late 80's. The timing of their ascendance, not surprisingly, coincides with an explosion of sexual and artistic permissiveness in Italy, with its inevitable backlash against the church. The book is largely a cinematic catalog, describing the setting, plot and acting for each film. You can count on a description of how, a) gory and b) sexy each film is. The pictures are fairly graphic, and I would surely keep this book away from the kids. As a series of reviews, I highly recommend the book.
If I was disappointed in any way, it is that I felt that the philosophical underpinnings of the genre was missing. Fulci and Romero weren't just making gory movies, they were making social statements. The recurring images of primitive tribes feasting on flesh, the dead rising from their graves to prey on the living are surely no accident. I would have appreciated a broader overview of the social/religious/political/gender issues. I sense that there is a college master's level thesis there. This book would have been a nice place to publish it. Alas, it is missing.
I have one small beef. I would have appreciated a cross-reference to the films, in the form of an index or the like, and a filmography of the directors. It too, is alas, missing. Without it, the broader context can not be seen. For example, how do these films fit in against, say, Black Sabbath, a cornerstone horror film of the period?
Notwithstanding my reservations, I was glad to see this book published and enjoyed reading it. If you have seen one or two of these rarities, and are hoping for a broader look, this is a good place to start.
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