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Ecce Homo: How One Becomes What One Is; Revised Edition (Penguin Classics) Paperback – December 1, 1992


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Ecce Homo: How One Becomes What One Is; Revised Edition (Penguin Classics) + The Twilight of the Idols and The Anti-Christ: or How to Philosophize with a Hammer (Penguin Classics)
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Product Details

  • Series: Penguin Classics
  • Paperback: 144 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Classics; New Ed edition (December 1, 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140445153
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140445152
  • Product Dimensions: 0.4 x 5 x 7.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #229,592 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Libro desconcertante y enigmatico, escrito en circunstancias dramaticas --Los editores --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Language Notes

Text: English, German (translation)

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Customer Reviews

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The book does a good job of providing a cursory summary of all his previous work with his personal annotations.
Annak
Before you read this book, I recommend that you do at least a cursory review of his work; that way you won't be lost when he delves into his subject matter.
Brian W.
This is the difficulty of Nietzsche, who is all too easily categorized as the "Will to Power" philosopher of the modern period.
Steiner

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Hethur Suval on March 28, 1999
Format: Paperback
"Ecce Homo, on eof the supreme masterpieces of German prose, is perhaps the strangest 'autobiography' ever written"
"In late 1888, only four weeks before his final collapse into madness, Nietzsche (1844-1900) set out to trace his development as a tragic philosopher. He examines the heroes he has identified with, struggled against, and then overcome - Schopenhauer, Wagner, Christ - he predicts the cataclysmic impact of his forthcoming revaluation of all values, and he gives final, definitive expression to his main beliefs. Throughout he employs the range of exuberant but unsettling styles descibed in Michael Tanner's Introduction, 'the high spirits, the manic self-celebrations, the parodistic orgies', which blend with a far more elegiac voice in a way 'that is uniquely moving, especially when one knows that total and permanent breakdown was imminent.'"
Isn't this what we are looking for when we go to read an autbiography? Isn't this the spirit that those who choose to write their autobiographies are interested in? Nietzsche was definitley ahead of his time in this genre of prose...take a look at Martha Stewart and Oprah....
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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 25, 2000
Format: Paperback
In Ecce Homo, Nietzsche, clocked in the overt convention of the critical autobiography, lashes out at the practice of divorcing art from action. He takes aim at the reification of the linguistic world, which he believes has grown at the expense of the pre-linguistic world and his quarrel is with those who use words to mediate their experiences in the world in order to deny their own heroic capabilities.
"Saying 'Yes' to life," says Nietzsche, "is its strangest and hardest problem; the will to life rejoicing over its inexhaustibility even in the sacrifice of its highest types--that is what I call Dionysian, that is what I understood as the bridge to the psychology of the tragic poet." This Dionysian status, he goes on to say, is not gained through "thumbing through books," but by suffering through experience and rejoicing in the vitality of living.
Nietzsche also writes, "In questions of decadence I am experienced." In this he intimates his own experience of life denial through words and his imagery compares intellectual endeavors with physical conditions, e.g. digestion.
"The German spirit," he says, "is an indigestion: it does not finish with anything." Nietzsche uses the human stomach as a metaphor of the reification of the linguistic world. The stomach digests food by breaking it down into its component parts, readily recognizable to physiology but having little to do with the original product.
An orange, after all is not just vitamin C. Furthermore, says Nietzsche, what the body cannot use is rejected as waste product. When disorders of the stomach occur, the body cannot distinguish between waste and nutrient and consequently it churns endlessly, causing distress to the entire organism.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Steiner VINE VOICE on March 4, 2007
Format: Paperback
Nietzsche's literary addendum to his philosophical oeuvre is, at its root, a radically modern autobiography. Written weeks before his collapse into paralysis, these are the final reflections of cogency from this great thinker; the sections are indeed self-inflated and passionate, with titles like `Why I am So Wise,' and `Why I am So Clever,' etc. However, Nietzsche is finally dubious about his reputation and whether or not he will ever be truly understood. He insists that his name "will be associated with the memory of something tremendous," and indeed it would. His work sought to expose the power structures of old societies and to expose the moral systems of Christianity. Nietzsche's tone is eerily prophetic as he insists that "there will be wars the like of which no one has ever seen," his stylish prose rings of a bold yet hysterical urgency. However, at the foundation of Nietzsche's thought is one of the great and subtle tensions in philosophy, the idea that his negating and destroying are "conditions of saying Yes." This is the difficulty of Nietzsche, who is all too easily categorized as the "Will to Power" philosopher of the modern period. We are still catching up to his profound insight, and this self-analysis should be a window into his genius and original intentions.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By B. Marold HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWER on April 2, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
True to my practice of avoiding free or $.99 Kindle editions,when there is a modestly priced (but a bit more than a dollar) edition, I selected this over the two editions available for less than a dollar, and I also avoided the edition which was combined with On the Genealogy of Morals, since the second title was available in "The Basic Works of Nietzsche", with four major works, for a price less than these two. Also, this is a genuine Penguin edition, with the translation by R. J. Hollingdale, the second most important Nietzsche translator into English. That means it has all of Hollingdale's notes plus Michael Tanner's introduction. With Nietzsche, one cannot have too many interpretations to help you out.

The edition has a fully active table of contents. As a Kindle edition, its only drawback is that it does not have active notes, which the Kaufmann translation in "The Basic Works of Nietzdche" does have. On the other side of the coin, the Kaufmann edition is the ONLY Kindle volume I have ever encountered which does not allow you to copy passages. When, in scholarly work you wish to be scrupulous with your attestation of quotes, that is a big drawback. I also like the fact that in the shorter edition, things are just easier to find than in the huge "Basic Works".
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