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Echoes across the Blue Ridge: Stories, Essays, and Poems Perfect Paperback – August 1, 2010


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Editorial Reviews

Review

Straight from the land of the sky, song, and story, another dynamite collection -- strong and surprising -- these mountain iders know how to howl at the moon! --Lee Smith

Anyone who enjoys Appalachian literature will be delighted by this excellent anthology, particularly because it introduces the reader to a number of our region' s gifted though lesser-known writers. Bravo! --Ron Rash

About the Author

Kathryn Stripling Byer is the author of Coming to Rest, Catching the Light, Black Shawl, Wildwood Flower (LSU Press), and The Girl in the Midst of the Harvest (Texas Tech Press). Among Kathryn's accolades are National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship, Southeast Booksellers Association Award for Poetry, Lamont Award, Roanoke-Chowan Poetry Prize, Brockman-Campbell Award and others. Presently she serves as program coordinator for NCWN West
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Product Details

  • Perfect Paperback: 238 pages
  • Publisher: Winding Path Press; first edition (August 1, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1450701523
  • ISBN-13: 978-1450701525
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 6 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,115,932 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Born, raised, and again living in Western North Carolina, George Ivey has spent more than eighteen years protecting rivers, farmland, and other natural resources in North Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, Tennessee, Georgia, and elsewhere. His writings have appeared in numerous publications, including Nature Conservancy, Iceland Review, and Smoky Mountain News. Up River is his first novel. Find out more at www.georgeivey.com.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By T.K. on September 4, 2010
Format: Perfect Paperback
I truly enjoyed reading these well-written stories that took me to the Appalachian mountain and into the heart of the fascinating people who live there. It is well worth your time to sit down a spell with them.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Scott Owens on November 5, 2010
Format: Perfect Paperback
What makes the Appalachian Mountains so special? Certainly one distinctive quality is age. Where else can you see stone so old it crumbles, trees left alone to grow as big around as houses, houses bent on one knee but still lived in, and traditions as old as . . . well, as old as the hills?

Things, even people, are allowed to grow old here without someone knocking them down in the name of progress or shuffling them off to a nursing home. And that's how the real magic of the place happens, because, in one respect, nothing dies here -- not really. Sure, physical presence may come and go, but the essential character of things is retained in stories, poems, songs, artifacts, traditions, and, most of all, memory.

The word "haunted" has a negative connotation in most places, but one can hardly read about the southern Appalachians without that word or a synonym being, if not named, then at least implied. Robert Morgan uses it in his Introduction to Echoes Across the Blue Ridge: "The deep valleys seem haunted by the natives who once lived there." Kay Byer uses it in a comment quoted by Nancy Simpson in her "Note from the Editor:" "our most haunting artifacts." The first poem, "Beyond the Clearing" by James Cox, certainly suggests it by referring to "a place sublime / where spirits sing invisibly." And the first two stories, "Rendezvous" by Charlotte Wolf and "The Third Floor Bedroom" by Lana Hendershott, are, to some degree about the sensation of being haunted. And despite the usual expectation that non-fiction wouldn't involve such fanciful ideas as spirits and haunting, even the first essay, "The Oldest Answer" by Steven Harvey quotes Bettie Sellers saying, "My bent was to espouse the unseen that's in the woods at night.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Nancy Purcell on September 26, 2010
Format: Perfect Paperback
Each poem, story, essay, pulls the reader into life in the Blue Ridge mountains, be it the authors life experience of growing up there or the aura of the place itself that inspires writers put the heart of western North Carolina on the page. Who wouldn't want this beautiful book on their coffee table or night stand? Outstanding trip! A perfect gift for any reader...be it birthday, thank you,
Christmas, New Years...Read it! Then come to the Blue Ridge and see it all for yourself.
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