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Eclipse in Action: A Guide for the Java Developer Paperback – May 15, 2003


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 380 pages
  • Publisher: Manning Publications; 7th edition (May 15, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1930110960
  • ISBN-13: 978-1930110960
  • Product Dimensions: 7.5 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.5 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #854,696 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"The technical information is dead on...I'd definitely recommend this book to anyone." -- JavaRanch.com

About the Author

David Gallardo is an independent software consultant and author specializing in software internationalization, Java web applications, and database development. He has been a professional software engineer for over fifteen years and has experience with many operating systems, programming languages, and network protocols. He is also the author of ""Java Oracle Database Development."" He lives in El Paso, Texas. Ed Burnette is a Principal Systems Developer at SAS, where he has worked on such diverse projects as compilers, debuggers, device drivers, performance tuning, and UNIX ports. He also helped write several commercial computer games. Currently, Ed uses Eclipse in the development of OLAP servers, mid-tier providers, and clients written in a mixture of C, Java, and C#. He lives near Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. Robert McGovern is a software developer for an international high voltage power supply company doing embedded development. He has a degree in artificial intelligence and is a member of the IEEE and the ACM. His personal interest is in Java & Ruby and he has been involved in computers and programming since the days of the Sinclair ZX Spectrum. Robert lives in West Sussex, England.


<div><b>David Gallardo</b> is an independent software consultant specializing in software internationalization, Java web applications, and database development. His recent experience includes leading database and internationalization development at a business-to-business e-commerce company, TradeAccess, Inc. He was also a senior engineer in the international product development group at Lotus Development Corporation, where he contributed to the development of a cross-platform library providing Unicode and international language support for Lotus products including Notes and 1-2-3. He is the author of <i>Java Oracle Database Development</i>. He lives in El Paso, Texas. <b>Ed Burnette</b> is a principal systems developer at SAS, where he has worked on such diverse projects as compilers, debuggers, device drivers, performance tuning, and UNIX ports. He also helped write several commercial computer games. Currently, Ed uses Eclipse in the development of OLAP servers, mid-tier providers, and clients written in a mixture of C, Java, and C#. He lives near Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. <b>Robert McGovern</b> is a software developer for an international high voltage power supply company doing embedded development. He has a degree in artificial intelligence.<br></div>


Robert P. McGovern, forty, was born in New Jersey just a few miles from the Meadowlands Sports Complex. After graduating from Holy Cross College, he surprised scouts and even himself by getting drafted by the Kansas City Chiefs. He made the team, and later played for the Pittsburgh Steelers and the New England Patriots. After his NFL days were over, he attended Fordham University's law school, went to work as a prosecutor, and brought those legal skills with him when he was assigned as a judge advocate general in the U.S. Army's 18th Airborne Corps. He helped prosecute the notorious case of Sergeant Hasan Akbar, accused of killing two army comrades in Kuwait. After tours of duty in Afghanistan and Iraq, McGovern is currently stationed in Virginia.


Bob Foster has worked for several decades as a business turnaround specialist and successful entrepreneur. With a direct and unorthodox approach, Bob specializes in saving businesses that have been deemed unsalvageable. He currently lives in Henderson, Nevada.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 24 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 27, 2003
Format: Paperback
Now that you've downloaded Eclipse and realized it is a big tool, if you are like me you thought you'd go looking for some books on the subject. I'd suggest stopping right here.
One pundant on usenet suggested that Eclipse has a learning curve like Emacs and that this is a good thing, because of boths power and flexibility. While I think Eclipse is more usable and seems to be easier to extend than that old war horse EMACS, the scope of what IS in Eclipse can be daunting. More importantly it is useful to get your head around the way the GUI is organized, so you can effecticvely use the tool. At less than 400 pages, you might think this book would not cover the ground, but this is not the case. This book specifically says it is not intended as a hardcopy version of the on-line help. The goal of the book is to get you started and you move you into some of the more interesting aspects of the IDE. I found the book to have succeeded well at it goal.
Continuing a recent trend from Manning this seems to be another well edited book that is kept managable in size, yet still containing a large amount of information. The book doesn't waste a lot of time getting started, by chapter three you are already learning about using JUnit, Log4J and the debugger. In later chapters, the authors have you working with Ant and CVS after working up a nice little example that that they even spend some time refactoring using the built in features of Eclipse. Integrated tool use would probably be sufficient, but they proceed to jump off into web development leveraging one of the hundreds of plugins available for Eclipse and show you how to debug directly in Eclipse using tomcat. In just over 200 pages a lot of very useful material has been covered.
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22 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Donald A Benish on February 5, 2004
Format: Paperback
This book is a very good explanation of what Eclipse is and does. It does assume the reader is somewhat familiar with IDEs and quite familiar with Java. It describes the reasons for Eclipse coming about and the way it is different from other IDEs. It gives some description of how to use it to start a project and how to set some preferences and properties. It does not give all the various details about every preference and property but does give some idea about how to find out what they are and do.
The examples it uses are on some very basic and useful features that Eclipse has integrated well. There is an overview on the Junit plugin and how to use it to do unit testing. Eclipse was designed with the focus on Agile or 'Extreme' programming style. The examples are decribed in the language of that paradigm. The unusual part of the book's style is how it presents an example of a problem and a solution, and then it may state that this isn't the best way to solve this problem and presents an alternative approach that is more practical, and so on. In this style, the book is more of a textbook and less of a reference. You need to read the whole book and proceed with examples as if it were a series of classroom lectures rather than as a way to quickly find out how to do something. Many of the example programs that can be downloaded from the website don't actually work but serve to demonstrate some feature of Eclipse.
One frustration, which I find in many such books, is that the example problems are uninteresting and trite. Many such books offer some baloney programs such as a car/vehicle/machine issue, which can be rather boring and pointless. This book offers a similarly boring problem of a star finder.
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22 of 22 people found the following review helpful By C. McGlone on June 25, 2003
Format: Paperback
For anyone that doesn't know about it, Eclipse is an IDE that is freely available and is usable for really just about anything. It's designed for versatility and it succeeds brilliantly. Of course, with increased versatility usually comes increased complexity. Eclipse In Action is written with Java developers in mind and leads you through the major functionality and extensibility of the IDE through in depth examples. The examples are great and have a nice depth (they don't feel as contrived as most examples in books like this). This has some definite benefits - you feel like you're getting real-life experience by doing examples and it makes the book smoother to read front to back. However, there is a drawback - this book doesn't always make a handy reference to put on the shelf. To figure out how something works, sometimes I find myself looking back a chapter or two to see how the example works so that I can work forward. I found that this book lent itself to being read straight through rather than picking out chapters to read individually. I found the book easy and enjoyable to read, although you'll probably want to be sitting in front of your computer working along to get the most out of it. The technical information is dead on and I found few mistakes - the editing is done very well. I'd definitely recommend this book to anyone that wants to get the most out of Eclipse.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 15, 2003
Format: Paperback
This book certainly fills in a need for a well organized, easy to read and exhaustive reference for the open source Eclipse IDE and platform.
The book is in fact quite ambitious since it seems to want to teach readers how to program, how to design and build software, how to use the Eclipse IDE as well as how to use a number of open source tools such as ANT, Log4J, JUnit, CVS, Tomcat, SWT and JFace and even XML!
The surprise is that it pretty much achieves its goal. Seasoned Java programmers may elect to skim through the more familiar sections and concepts and concentrate on the Eclipse specific stuff.
I tried to find one important Eclipse feature that was not at least mentioned but could not find one. Even developers very much familiar with Eclipse will probably learn new tricks by going through the various chapters.
I was expecting more or less a user's guide to the Eclipse IDE but in addition I found a very good although brief introduction to the Eclipse APIs and platform as well as relevent material on how to extend Eclipse by writing plug-ins
A few other books on Eclipse were recently published but I cannot compare not having read them but this one is certainly useful for newbies as well as regular Eclipse users and developers.
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