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Economic Justice and Natural Law Hardcover

ISBN-13: 978-0521767200 ISBN-10: 0521767202 Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 248 pages
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press; 1 edition (September 14, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0521767202
  • ISBN-13: 978-0521767200
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 1.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,187,234 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

'The revival of natural law theory with respect to foundational issues in ethics and politics has been matched stride for stride with an application of that view to controversial issues of public morality - abortion, euthanasia, stem-cell research, homosexual conduct, and so forth. What we had not yet seen is anything like a systematic account of how the natural law view should be brought to bear on central issues of economic justice. But we now have Gary Chartier's Economic Justice and Natural Law, a book exhibiting the dual virtues of a subtle understanding of natural law ethics with a richly detailed awareness of the economic matters about which the natural law should have something to say. We are all, whether friend or foe of the natural law view, in Chartier's debt for his putting natural law theory to the test in this way.' Mark C. Murphy, PhD, Fr. Joseph T. Durkin, S. J. Professor of Philosophy, Georgetown University

'The new natural law theory of ethics is a powerful and important way of thinking about how to live in today's world. The question how to apply that theory in the political, economic, and legal spheres is only just beginning to be asked. Gary Chartier's book provides an elegant, clear, and well-informed guide to how natural law theorists might go about answering that question in detail. It will be essential reading for anyone who wants to think hard about these issues.' Timothy Chappel, MA, PhD, Professor of Philosophy, The Open University

'Gary Chartier's perceptive, timely, and beautifully ordered book moves easily between the theoretical and the concrete. It demonstrates how the new classical natural law theory illuminates the ideal foundations of economic justice and the measures needed to rectify injustice in a non-ideal world. Chartier's examination of issues including at-will employment, peasants' property interests in the land they work, workplace democracy, and urban renewal is probing and trenchant. This fine study reflects broad reading without descending into pedantry, and its lucid organization and graceful style make it accessible to a wide range of readers.' Stephen R. Munzer, BPhil, JD, Professor of Law, University of California at Los Angeles

'Gary Chartier's important and original book sets out a rich, illuminating framework for addressing questions of economic justice. The arguments are thoughtful and wide-ranging, and the writing is crisp and elegant. A valuable reference point for future work.' Jonathan Crowe, PhD, Senior Lecturer in Law, University of Queensland

Book Description

Natural law emphasizes the diverse aspects of human welfare and reasonable ways of realizing those aspects. Gary Chartier spells out a version of the theory, and applies it to topics including property, work, and economic responsibilities to others.

More About the Author

My motto these days is, "Give peace a chance." I hope my writing and speaking can help people find ways to craft patterns of life marked by peaceful, voluntary cooperation.

Everything I've published to date has been non-fiction. I write about law, politics, ethics, and religion, largely from a philosophical perspective.

My philosophical work is very much in the analytic tradition, though I'm inclined to embrace the process metaphysics of Alfred North Whitehead, Charles Hartshorne, John Cobb, and David Ray Griffin. In moral and political philosophy, I've been influenced by people including Thomas Nagel, John Finnis, David Wiggins, and Owen Flanagan, along with my Center for a Stateless Society compatriots Roderick T. Long, Charles W. Johnson, Kevin Carson, Sheldon Richman, Joe Stromberg, and Brad Spangler. In philosophy of religion and philosophical theology, I've gained a lot from current and not-so-current thinkers including, apart from people I've already mentioned, Karl Rahner, Nicholas Lash, Austin Farrer, David Brown, John Macquarrie, Nicholas Wolterstorff, Robert Adams, Fritz Guy, Charles Teel, Jr., David Larson, and John Hick.

Politically, I'm a left-wing market anarchist. I take anarchism to be the project of doing without the state. I support the elimination of states and their replacement by a diverse array of consensual communities in which people experiment with ways of being human and of being free.

I'm a market anarchist because (while I don't think everyone should be forced into a cookie-cutter mold), I'd opt for a state-free community in which people enjoyed robust individual possessory rights and were free to structure relationships through exchange. My market anarchism is left-wing because I support inclusion and oppose subordination, deprivation, and aggressive and preventive war. I own the American individualist anarchists, especially Benjamin Tucker and Lysander Spooner, as forebears; thus, I'm happy to identify as a socialist in something like the sense suggested by Tucker's work.

My day job is as associate dean of La Sierra University's School of Business. At La Sierra, I teach courses in business ethics, global poverty, employee and labor relations, religion and science, political philosophy, and social theory. On a more personal level: I'm sentimental and nostalgic. I'm an insomniac, an early riser, a geek, a technophile, and a vegetarian. I abhor positional authority. Friendship is central to who I am. Born in Glendale, I've lived in SoCal most of my life and it still moves and excites me. I devour TV shows via Netflix. And I read, and read, and read.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 35 people found the following review helpful By Daniel Chang on June 12, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I had to take a class entitled "business ethics" with the author of this book. I truly question the "ethics" of forcing students to buy your own book if there is profit to be made - a conflict of interest. At over $100, it was way overpriced, even compared to other standard type textbooks. I wouldn't have minded so much if it was a good book that I learned from. But rather, this was a very difficult read - "academia" type book. This isn't the book to read if you want to get an overview of business ethics in practice...but rather the book to read if you're an academician. Unfortunately, most students in MBA programs care more about the practical aspect of business.

Difficult read, overpriced, forced to buy = 1 star.
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