Buy New
$19.99
Qty:1
  • List Price: $27.98
  • You Save: $7.99 (29%)
& FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
Temporarily out of stock.
Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we ship the item.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Eddie Cantor: Kid Boots has been added to your Cart
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for up to $6.49
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Color:
  • Eddie Cantor: Kid Boots
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
  • To view this video download Flash Player
      

Eddie Cantor: Kid Boots

8 customer reviews

Additional DVD options Amazon Price New from Used from
DVD
"Please retry"
1-Disc Version
$19.99
$19.99

Summertime is Book Time
Discover our hand-selected picks of the best books for kids of all ages. Browse by age: Baby-2 | Ages 3-5 | Ages 6-8 | Ages 9-12.
$19.99 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details Temporarily out of stock. Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we ship the item. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Eddie Cantor: Kid Boots + Ali Baba Goes to Town + Kid Millions
Price for all three: $54.46

Some of these items ship sooner than the others.

Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

Eddie Cantor, Clara Bow. Eddie Cantor springs to life in a classic 1920s silent film sporting a delightful score by Arthur Siegel. Bonus features include some of Cantor's memorable shorts! Silent. 1926/b&w/60 min/NR.

Special Features

None.

Product Details

  • Format: Multiple Formats, Color, NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: Original Cast Record
  • DVD Release Date: March 13, 2007
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000HXDWPA
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #116,338 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Customer Reviews

5 star
75%
4 star
25%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See all 8 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Stephen H. Wood on April 14, 2007
Eddie Cantor's KID BOOTS (1923) is one of the rarest films in my DVD collection. It has been lost for eighty years and makes its home video debut now from an independent DVD company called Big House. The 60 minute print is quite good--it may be the only copy in existence. Cantor is an unwilling witness to a not-yet divorce that involves a large amount of money if the couple can reconcile. This fast and fun movie co-stars Clara Bow and Billie Dove. On a separate sound short, Eddie recalls how Clara taught him to tone down his vaudeville personality and he taught her how to be funny.

Speaking of which, there are another hour of priceless shorts on this DVD besides KID BOOTS. They include a 1929 sound short, filmed at Astoria Studios on Long Island, showing us Cantor's blackface song and joke routine as done on the New Amsterdam Theatre roof at midnight. This is the only print in existence and was just recently found in a New Jersey garage. We also get a 1924 Lee deForest Phonofilm sound short with Eddie doing his Ziegfeld routine, without the blackface. We get a few jokes and a couple of songs in a truly nostalgic short.

The whole DVD is a must-own curio for Eddie Cantor and Florenz Ziegfeld fans, and it includes regular mail and e-mail addresses for the Eddie Cantor Appreciation Society. A certain older audience will truly cherish this precious Jazz Age DVD. You know who you are.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By David Ackerman on October 6, 2006
Finally! After 80 years here is the Cantor you've been waiting for! The silent film adaptation of his 1923 musical KID BOOTS is now released with a wonderful musical background score by the late Broadway composer, Arthur Siegel. This hour long feature also stars the incredible Clara Bow!

EXTRAS! The 1924 Lee deForest Phonofilm A FEW MOMENTS WITH EDDIE CANTOR. This is old Banjo Eyes performing a short sample of his vaudeville act and singing two songs!

A ZIEGFELD MIDNIGHT FROLIC (1928) is an extremely rare short that features Cantor in blackface simulating what he did on the rooftop of the New Amsterdam. Here you get three songs from his Victor period!

PHOTO GALLERY! Hear Cantor impersonator, Rick Rogers, recall (in Cantor's own words!) the making of KID BOOTS while looking at rare stills.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By K. Doyle on September 6, 2007
Verified Purchase
The quality of this one is pretty good considering the age-- though the Phonofilm short is video field reversed (probably fixable with the right software tools but you'd have to rip it to your computer).

Times were pretty different back in those days, this is a very interesting window to the past-- and I got quite a few chuckles out of Kid Boots. Wish they would release Whoopee and Palmy Days-- Cantor was an interesting guy and there doesn't appear to be much of him available. I'm not sure what the point of his doing Midnight Frolic in blackface was, as none of the routines or songs seemed to be connected with it in any way-- no doubt a historical oddity that now seems just bizarre, along with some of the jokes in the Phonofilm segment which would probably not be received favorably in todays world. A nice little curio of bygone days...

-- Followup:
After writing this review I got around to reading his autobiography. Turns out, blackface came about in a time where acting along with the rest of society was segregated. Black actors were not allowed to appear on stage with white actors. But there were characters in the plays of the time that were black, for example, waiters and bellboys. So, white characters were "made up" to be black. Cantor cut his acting teeth on some of these parts, and tried to make the most of them in order to get more on-stage time. He was entertaining at it, and consequently became known as a blackface comic in the early days. Later in his career, he had established a carefully designed comedy repertoire which did not include blackface, but at one gig was told that he could come back next week providing he had different material because many of the same patrons would be attending.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By drkhimxz on December 5, 2008
Verified Purchase
It must have been 1935, give or take a year or two, that my grandmother took me on the trolley car to see an Eddie Cantor film. A "Talkie" in the argot of that era. At that time, Cantor was at his career peak: among the top box office draws in films, still a sellout in the changing vaudeville scene, a sure favorite in Broadway and touring reviews, while he was just beginning to be succeeded on radio comedy by his old friend of the same age, Jack Benny.He remained a popular radio star while his popularity in the other media began to fade, never entirely disappearing until poor health forced him off his successful TV show (which faced the mega-competition of Ed Sullivan's star laden variety show).
Through all of this, to me and to most of his fans, silent film would have appeared only a way to cash in on his popularity by showing him do a dance or two, perhaps gesture his way through a dialogue involving broad gestures by both performers in a Weber and Fields type of set-up.
Imagine my surprise at seeing this comedy, the first of the "kid" films (Kid from Spain, Kid Millions, etc.) and the only silent one to the best of my knowledge. Imagine my even greater surprise to find it so good as to warrant inclusion in the usual Chaplin, Keaton, Lloyd, etc., selections which mark the nostalgia comedy film assemblage. His actions mesh smoothly with the written gag lines and, he appears quite at ease, without the stiffness that often marked the first appearances of live performers in film (note the stiffness of his "buddy" in the film, Lawrence Gray, which is typical.
As others have pointed out, Clara Bow is fine, while the other "girls" fit their roles quite well.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?