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  • Eden at the End of the World
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Eden at the End of the World


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Product Details

  • Format: Multiple Formats, Closed-captioned, Color, NTSC, Widescreen
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.66:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: Nat'l Geographic Vid
  • DVD Release Date: April 8, 2008
  • Run Time: 50 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0012Q3T7W
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #163,399 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Special Features

None.

Editorial Reviews

National Geographic presents a rare glimpse into one of the last great wild edens on Earth - Patagonia.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Red Xala on March 18, 2012
Everyone's favorite Wall Street robber barons, the infamous Goldman Sachs, sponsor this National Geographic documentary on Patagonia. In the event that you inadvertently miss National Geographic's fawning mention of Goldman Sachs' donation of hundreds of thousands of acres in Tierra del Fuego for wildlife preservation, don't worry -- they overtly plug commercials for G.S. both at the beginning and at the end of the DVD.
As for the documentary footage, National Geographic (as is par for the course) delivers excellent cinematography and expert information on the fauna of the region. In particular, significant coverage is given to the following: Magellanic penguins and the raising of their young; Elephant seals, the "harems" of the dominant males, and violent clashes between dominate males and potential usurpers; Guanacos (a member of the camel family), and the particularly feisty behavior of the (normally docile) males during mating season (e.g., "spitting," neck wrestling, charging, biting, etc.) N.G. also places emphasis on the cruel side of nature in Patagonia - Predator birds eating penguin and parrot chicks; Sea lions eating adult penguins, Orcas killing sea lion pups, and so forth. However, the dark motif of man as the primary destroyer of fragile Patagonia resurfaces throughout the entire documentary. From sheep ranchers promoting overgrazing and subsequent desertification, to commercial fisheries depleting fish stocks, to man's introduction of invasive species -- National Geographic points to "the misguided actions of man" as the greatest danger to the region. While I can appreciate N.G.
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I've been planning a trip to this part of the world for some time, but this video moved it to the top of my list. The breathtaking scenery, the fearsome, beautiful and fascinating wildlife are beautifully photographed and clearly explained. The all-important description of the science and dedication that are being applied to the restoration and preservation of this region is clear and compelling. Even if you're not planning to travel, I recommend this video as beautiful, instructive, and even awe-inspiring.
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We have lived in Argentina, and made a trip around "the HORN" in 2001. It was a visual recollection of the natural beauty found there.
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2 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Jeffery Mingo on May 15, 2008
Penguins received a disproportionate amount of coverage in this work. I really think the work would like to piggyback on the success of "Happy Feet." It covers a region that the main character visited in the animated film. One difference is that this showed a seal that outran a penguin, whereas that movie implied that South American penguins were safe from clumsy seals once they reached the shore. I question whether this work is child-friendly like the movie. Jeremy Irons' narration, which channels Patrick Stewart's voice, and the biological issues raised may not excite young ones.

On the one hand, this work just says, "Here is one animal of the region, then here is another." People who want to ignore the terrible ecological impact that humans are having all over the world could minimize this into just a wild kingdom special. However, the narration spells out how humans are being harmful. It showed an alpaca's relative's carcass stuck on barbed wire. If animals can't travel, they can't chase faraway food. Western sheep tear up grasses that other animals need. Also addressed in "Happy Feet," when human capture so much squid and fish from down there, the animals that used to have those fish all to themselves now starve. There was a tit-for-tat here. The work says beavers from North America are messing up the land. Though the work says nothing on the subject, in Louisiana, the nutria, a South American rodent, is ruining land.

When you see Brazilian citizens burning down the Amazon, you can tell why that region is in trouble. When you hear that China has more than one billion citizens, you can connect the dots and see why pandas face extinction. There are very few humans seen here.
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