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Eden Eden Eden (Lords of the Solar Church 5) (v. 5) Paperback – April 23, 2009


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Product Details

  • Series: Lords of the Solar Church 5
  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Solar Books; New Revised edition (April 23, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0979984742
  • ISBN-13: 978-0979984747
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.3 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,986,310 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"... violent, transgressive and inspired, the last great avant-garde visionary of the 20th Century."-- Edmund White

"A new landmark and a starting-point for new writing." -- Roland Barthes

About the Author

Guyotat, Pierre (b. 1940). The most avantgarde and subversive French novelist of the later 20th c. Guyotat's works examine the violence of language, sexuality, politics, racism, and war. He is now regarded as one of the greatest of all modern French authors.

Professor Stephen Barber. Stephen is Research Professor of Media Arts at the digital arts research center at Kingston University in the UK, and, in 2008, a Visiting Professor at the California Institute of the Arts. He is the author of nineteen books, and the recipient of several major awards.

Barthes, Roland (1915 - 1980) was a French academic and literary critic whose writings on semiotics, pioneered by Ferdinand de Saussure and Roman Jakobson, helped establish structuralism and was a central figure in the development of the leaders of recent French philosophy, such as Foucault and Derrida.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By darryl wildblood ddwildblood@hotmail.com on March 30, 2001
Format: Paperback
Eden, Eden, Eden is an ultraviolent and truly shocking text, a 160 page long paragraph of unrelenting sex and violence. It's beautiful! The subject of the book is the war ravaged landscape of Algeria, but perhaps more importantly the landscape of the body, both intermingle, boundaries blur, bestial prostitutional acts are minutely rendered giving the text an intense physical quality that fends off symbolism and romanticism. Reading this book is like watching the innards of Kurtz's mind spill open.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Mark Nadja on September 23, 2007
Format: Paperback
Or, one should take the advice of the preeminent French critic Roland Barthes in the introduction when he writes that *Eden Eden Eden* must be "entered, not by believing it, becoming party to an illusion, participating in a fantasy, but by writing the language in [Guyotat's] place, signing it along with him." I might also suggest *singing* along with Guyotat because *Eden Eden Eden* has a uniquely intoxicating incantatory quality whose power is as much viscerally musical as it is appallingly visual. Read aloud, *Eden* has the rhythm of a monologue wired directly to the heart of darkness. You'll just want to make certain you're alone in a soundproof room if you dare to read these words outside your own mind. For that matter, you might even want to shield this text from the eyes of your casually curious over-the-shoulder reader on the morning train. In this case, there's no really good way to answer the question, "Whatcha reading there?"

What's this book about?--again, in Barthes words, it's a "free text," by which he means it's pointless to look for "meaning" in terms of the conventional paradigms of character, plot, theme, symbolism, etc. The situation, however, seems to be this: a sort of camp town in the desert, a brothel of male prostitutes, and the soldiers ((of an unnamed conflict)) drillers ((of oil or ore; it's unspecified)) and assorted nomads and shepherds who wander in from the surrounding wastelands to use them. The text consists of a single uninterrupted paragraph of 181 pages describing in excruciatingly minute mechanical detail an unending series of copulatory acts without any seeming point but to emphasize the slime, stench, and excretions of living bodies.

Guyotat's text overpowers and oppresses us with the most elementary fact: life is disgusting.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By M. Hori on November 9, 2005
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This novel reads like some of Burroughs' earlier fictions--for example, The Soft Machine--but without the black humor that the American beat uses to leaven his nasty loaves. With Guyotat we are left with one continuous description of anal and oral rape, usually by soldiers on men and boys. There's no plot as we find in de Sade, no flights of vision or hyper-crazy odes to revolt as in Artaud to make it memorable--only the cubistic clinches of flesh and flesh--the terrible consequences of the weak in the clutches of the strong. This is not a pleasant read and I do not recommend it for the squeamish. I wonder what the author does to relax and have fun?
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful By darryl wildblood ddwildblood@hotmail.com on March 30, 2001
Format: Paperback
Eden, Eden, Eden is an ultraviolent and truly shocking text, a 160 page long paragraph of unrelenting sex and violence. It's beautiful! The subject of the book is the war ravaged landscape of Algeria, but perhaps more importantly the landscape of the body, both intermingle, boundaries blur, bestial prostitutional acts are minutely rendered giving the text an intense physical quality that fends off symbolism and romanticism. Reading this book is like watching the innards of Kurtz's mind spill open.
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8 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Bookdude on January 16, 2007
Format: Paperback
The introduction to this book promises that Pierre Guyotat's "Eden Eden Eden" will scar you. Unfortunately, for me, it does no such thing. Monsieur Guyotat should have known that an endless barrage of shocking and outrageous imagery, far from scarring the reader, ultimately desensitizes the reader to its violence and sexual perversities. If Guyotat had simply spaced out the violence and perversities in between far less shocking passages, he might have achieved his desired result. I found this book to be so boring and repititious that I gave up somewhere around page 50. In fact I suspect that there's something rather comical about the whole text. Not recommended.
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