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The Edge of Human (Blade Runner, Book 2) Paperback – August 1, 1996


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New Adult Fiction by Rainbow Rowell
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 292 pages
  • Publisher: Spectra (August 1, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0553575708
  • ISBN-13: 978-0553575705
  • Product Dimensions: 6.8 x 4.2 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (24 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #989,002 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Jeter's recent spate of tie-in novels (a Star Trek: Deep Space Nine novel, etc.)?his primary production since Wolf Flow (1992)?likely has reached its apex with this book, which notably is not a sequel to the late Philip K. Dick's classic Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? but to the hit film based on it, Blade Runner. That movie, set in an apocalyptically dismal L.A. of the near future, became a cult classic, especially after the release of the director's cut, which raised ambiguities scarcely hinted at in the original version. Jeter trades on these uncertainties as the replicant-hunter Deckard returns from Northern California to search for an alleged sixth replicant. Several characters from the movie make appearances here, including a few believed to be dead. Most significant is Roy Batty, who claims to be the human upon whom one of the replicants was based; in his own search for the sixth replicant, Batty teams up with a medically enhanced Dave Holden, Deckard's former partner, who is at various times convinced that virtually everyone in the novel is a replicant. Like Dick, Jeter has a gift for limning believable conspiracies wherever a character turns. Featuring numerous questions of identity and twists of plot, as well as masterful depictions of a decaying L.A. reminiscent of Jeter's Madlands, this novel should fascinate even readers new to the Blade Runner universe.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist

Blade Runner, the ingenious movie version of Philip K. Dick's Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, has been widely acclaimed as one of the best sf films. With Dick long gone, Jeter undertakes the further adventures of twenty-first-century L.A. detective Deckard, whose recent narrow victory over a violent android "replicant" prompted a retreat to the wilderness with his replicant lover Rachel. But there is at least one more vendetta-minded replicant still on the loose. Sarah Tyrell, sole surviving heir to the powerful replicant-manufacturing Tyrell Corporation and the human model for Rachel, pulls Deckard out of retirement and into a no-win predicament. Not only are there more replicants than anyone guessed, but Deckard is now wanted for the murder of Pris, who was not, as he had assumed, a replicant but fully human. Jeter masterfully reproduces the gritty film noir atmosphere of the movie while providing previously undisclosed and fascinating character background. Must reading for the film's large cult following. Carl Hays --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

K. W. Jeter is an American science fiction and thriller author known for his literary writing style, dark themes, and complex, paranoid characters. His latest novels are THE KINGDOM OF SHADOWS, set in the sinister & glamorous world of the film industry of the Third Reich, and the Kim Oh Thriller series -- KIM OH 1: REAL DANGEROUS GIRL, KIM OH 2: REAL DANGEROUS JOB and KIM OH 3: REAL DANGEROUS PEOPLE, with more to come.

Jeter is an exhilarating writer who always seems to have another rabbit to pull out of his hat.
-- The New York Times Book Review

Brain-burning intensity . . .
-- Village Voice

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By "repdetec" on January 1, 2001
Format: Paperback
This novel was quite entertaining, but I found Jeter's writing at times to be pointlessly descriptive, and I often skipped down as much as a page waiting for him to get back to the action instead of rehashing old scenes in the movie, or filling up whole paragraphs with flowery language that had no relevance to the story and brought it to a halt. Other than that, it was an enjoyable read with good pacing.
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22 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Erin K. Darling on March 6, 2002
Format: Hardcover
I really enjoyed both "Blade Runner" the movie (it's in my top five favorites of all time,) and the PK Dick book the movie was based on, "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep." _BR 2_, however, is just unfiltered tripe.
This novel attempts to be a sequel to the movie, rather than the novel, and, let me say it again, it's done so in a truly awful manner. The (un)original bits that Jeter came up with are frequently interspersed with flashbacks to the movie in a really uninteresting manner, and the writing itself is clunky and amateurish. One example, and I swear I'm not making this up or embellishing it in any way:
"She ascended to the appointed place, at the appointed hour. Without effort, almost without will, thermal sensors had registered her presence within the small space, a disembodied voice had asked if she'd wanted to go up to the building's roof, far above the dense weave of structure and light that formed the static ocean of the city."
[SPUTTER!]
Oh, and there are more equally bad paragraphs I could throw at you, but I won't foist those other atrocities off upon you - I don't dislike *anyone* that much.
If you, like me, thirst for ever more "Blade Runner" Stuff, my best advice is to stay right the heck away from this novel, and read some of the other (non-fiction) pieces that have been written about _DADOES_ and about the movie - you'll find it far more satisfying, and you'll be much less inclined to beat your head repeatedly against something hard and/or spikey to erase this travesty from your brain.
Oh, was I using my Outside Voice when I said that? Well, K.W. Jeter, I would apologize for such a scathing review of something you are in all likelihood very proud of; however, I don't recall anyone apologizing to me for the hours of my life I lost whilst reading this book, so I'm calling us even.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By roymeo on June 3, 2000
Format: Paperback
This is a movie-nerds' wet dream. This is what they'd all wished had been done with Highlander. A continuation of the movie's story in the style of Dick's book, with multiple scenes which are reproductions or reflections from the original (another Deckard/Batty fight in the rain on decaying city infrastructure). Pretty good for the Geekbook mindcandy category.

Pretty bad in just about every other way.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By drayk@monarchy.com on December 18, 1997
Format: Paperback
BR2 was, overall, an enjoyable read. It succeeded in keeping me guessing what exactly was going on, but left me disappointed with it's resolution.
The book draws heavily on images, characters, and dialogue from the movie, with a little help from Dick's novel. As with some of the Star Wars novels, however, this feels like a mantra used to evoke something without full justification. It also seems to be asking for someone to make a movie sequel out of it, being writen in an almost cinematic style.
Blade Runner (the movie) and Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep both had their amazing qualities, and the creation of BR from DADoES was an impressive feat. By trying to reunite the two, Jeter does both a disservice.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 4, 1999
Format: Paperback
This novel reads like an unsold script for a Blade Runner movie turned into book form. It's just a rehash of the original...except not nearly as thought-provoking or entertaining. This was one of the tougher reads I've ever experienced. If this were the only book I had on a deserted island...I'd just eat it, because there's no way I could re-read it.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 1, 2001
Format: Paperback
This book is the sequel to the movie not a sequel to Do Androids Dream Of Electric Sheep?, for being what it is it's a very good continuation, there are a couple of things that bothered me but were background elements, not anything to do with the story itself, I would really like to know what other people think about this book, not many people have reviewed it even though it's selling. I don't suggest you to read the third book, unless you are a hardcore fan.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I found the story-line following the movie version both good and dissappointing. I would have hoped for a movie tie-in, plot-wise, but follow the original story more faithfully. All in all, not that bad a book.
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 30, 1998
Format: Paperback
The problem with most sequels is that their predecesors come to natural ends. That is a problem in this sequel as well, but not as much as it could have been. Unfortunatly for readers, to understand this book you HAVE to have seen the Blade Runner: Director's Cut because this book contradicts the International Cut and Theatrical Release's "happy ending" completly. I'm not going to spoil the book, but it just does. It is very well written, even if it soes rely to much on the events of the film(there are about 15 references to "Wake up....time to die!"). It also features characters from Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?(including JR Isadore, the character JF Sebastion was presumably based on). The greatest thing about this boook is the ability to keep the reader guessing(I never expected the event at the end of the book), which makes it a fulfilling read.
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