Amazon.com: Customer Reviews: Edible History: Easy Ancient Celtic, Gallic and Roman Techniques for Leavening Bread Without Modern Commercial Yeast
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on August 28, 2012
I loved the idea of trying to make bread without commercial yeast and was excited to read this. The history given is great and the author does explain how to get the bread started with no yeast, but there are is not enough recipes to really get me excited about this book. It is incredibly short and seems to just get started on the topic of ancient bread and it is finished. I would have loved more history and more recipes to make.
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on August 18, 2012
I liked this book and the recipes seem like they work fine (I have tried only the sourdough, but it didn't have any problems) but it is too short. Ms. Cookson, there has to be more history that you came up with and in a book called, "Edible History" I want that. I want to see a full recipe for two loaves made with leaven, or an actual Roman sourdough recipe. Sure it worked fine to use one from another cook book, but I don't think it would have been to difficult to find one that used honey instead of sugar like you talk about. Your book was only 20 kindle pages long, so I think there was some room to expand. I think the idea behind the book was good, but I wanted more information after reading it.
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It's a great little article, but...for a book, it falls flat.

No photos, too little history, no real recipes on how to use these old leavening methods. I was enthralled with the concept the title implied, and had really high hopes, but then...there were three "recipes" for the leavening, nothing about the breads themselves, and not enough history to make it truly intriguing. The whole thing is short, more like an article than even a small cookbook, and it left me incredibly disappointed.

I love history, and I love it's connection with our foods. It's often the best way to get an insight into what women's lives were like in an era, since most histories were about men and heroic deeds rather than the day to day life of a woman. Seeing what and how people ate seems to open up a window to the past for me, and it really intrigues me. This was a great idea, but the author just didn't deliver enough of it to make it great.

Please, Ms. Cookson...expand it. Include photographs, sources for ancient grains, maybe some actual recipes for those of us who like more than "flour, salt, water, and leaven" to go on. Tell us about the ancient bakeries of Rome, about the era in which grains were becoming common in the diet, where these cultures thrived and during what time frame. Make it fun and interesting, you had such a great start!
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on December 29, 2012
Three very basic wild fermentation recipes and a few paragraphs about general history don't really make a book worth reading. If you have never experimented with making bread starter from scratch, you might find the recipes useful. However, the author doesn't offer any historical evidence to back up her recipes or any sources for her information. A few extra pages of background and a short bibliography would make this book a lot more worthwhile.
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VINE VOICEon August 30, 2012
Intestering book I got for my Kindle from Amazon. I love history and found this bread making book inspiring. Making breads without yeast is an art for sure. The methods described in the book are ancient and I now know this type of breadmaking came after beer making, mead making actually. The bubbles seen in beer were thought to be able to make bread rise and to some extent that is what happened. I find myself too lazy to try these methods but certainly learned a history lesson. (Edible History: Easy Ancient Celtic, Gallic and Roman Techniques for Leavening Bread Without Modern Commercial Yeast)
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on March 13, 2015
It was interesting to learn about how ancient cultures would make bread without yeast. Some of the recipes were very time consuming, they will not make it into my regular rotation of recipes. The bread I made was good but not as good as some of the yeast risen bread recipes I use. Good for a food history lesson, but not in the kitchen.
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on February 17, 2015
I gave it 3 stars because of the cost. Fortunately I was able to read the book with out paying because of kindle unlimited.
I think it is too expensive for 3 recipes and there really isn't much history. I will say the recipes look interesting and worth trying.
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on May 30, 2014
I homeschool my children and thought this would be a fun book to have in our library. I have also been told that we may have a gluten sensitivity, so this book was a double blessing. The information was good. thebook is short, and it's an easy read. I look foward to trying the recipes with my 4 and 16 yr old girls in the next few weeks.
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on June 19, 2012
This book not only reveals some interesting history about bread and bread making, it also reveals the simplicity and joy that can be had creating your own bread from scratch. I won't be buying bread from the store any time soon, LOL.
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on December 18, 2012
This would be more of an abridged history of bread. It is an incredibly short read and could have been considerably more in depth.
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