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Edible and Medicinal Plants of the Rockies Paperback – May 19, 2004


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Lone Pine Publishing (May 19, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1551052296
  • ISBN-13: 978-1551052298
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.6 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (66 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #172,344 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Edible and Medicinal Plants of the Rockies by Linda Kershaw
An important book for those in the Northern and Central Rocky mountain areas as well as other areas in the West. This is a photo-based guide focusing on the identification of wild edible plants. Kershaw's book, like other Lone Pine publications, covers lots of material. Brief descriptions of foods and medicines, often referring to uses by Native American Peoples, are given for each plant.
Like the other books in this section, there is no detailed processing information. This book covers 182 'kinds' of plants using about 350 photographs and 73 illustrations. A 'kind' for instance, is 'all docks', or 'all Oregon Grapes' discussed together. A 'Pictorial Guide', just after the Table of Contents, shows rows and columns of small duplicate pictures of all plants covered in the book for quick reference. Many people love this 'Pictorial Guide' concept in the field because it can help them quickly find the plant they are trying to identify. ........ About 20% of the plants covered can be found in various places across North America. Many of the plants covered are not found in other photographic guides. Highly recommended if you are in the Northern and Central Rockies, generally recommended for use in combination with other books as part of a western wild food library.
The last time we checked our associate Amazon.com...
The price was: $ 13.96
There were 25 pages of the book you could browse
The average reviewer rating was 5 out of 5 stars --Evaluated by John Kallas, Ph.D., Director, Wild Food Adventures 4125 N Colonial Ave, Portland, OR 97217-3338

About the Author

LINDA KERSHAW has been an avid naturalist since childhood and focused her studies on botany at the University of Waterloo, earning her master's degree in 1976. Following her education, she has worked as a consultant and researcher in northwestern Canada and as an editor/author in Edmonton, while pursuing her two favorite pastimes -- photography and illustrating.

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Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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This book is very detailed with great pictures and description.
This guy
Living in the Rockies, I purchased this book to be aware of what plants are safe to use for food or medicinal purposes.
Susan Coon
Mountains) & Kershaw's "parent" wildflower book, Lone Tree's Plants of the Rocky Mountains.
David C. Young

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

50 of 51 people found the following review helpful By Leslie G Nelson on August 9, 2004
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The first thing you notice about this book is its wonderfully sturdy construction. It is well made, ready to withstand some time in the woods with you!

Next you will notice that it is color coded. The tree section is green, shrubs orange, herbs burgandy etc. Within each section the plants are divided by families.

Each plant has at least one very good color photo. Most of them have two or three! Many also have illustrations. Some of the plants are covered in one page, others take two.

A typical page is: Top of the Page: Mint Family Herbs

The mint family is a two page spread with three nice photos. It says "Wild Mints Mentha spp." Then FOOD: These plants can be eaten alone as greens, raw or cooked. . . The next paragraph is MEDICINE: The active medicinal ingredient, menthol has been shown. . . OTHER USES: These aromatic plants were hung in dwellings as air-fresheners, and they were also crushed. . .

DESCRIPTION: Glandular-dotted perenials, smelling strongly of mint. . .The Description section also included info on where the plant is likely to be found. In a colored box at the bottom of the page WARNING: Wild mint and spearmint are high in pulegone, which stimulates the uterus. . .

Each plant includes information on poisonous look-likes if any, but there is also a full section on poisonous plants.

The book also includes a glossary and an index.

Because it is difficult for any one field guide to have EVERYTHING you are looking for, I like to use this book alongside Edible Wild Plants: A North American Field Guide by Elias and Dykeman. I also really like Linda Kershaw's other book Plants of the Rocky Mountains.
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37 of 37 people found the following review helpful By David C. Young on August 16, 2008
Format: Paperback
For the basics on this great book, see Leslie Nelson's review -- it's spot on in describing its many strengths. I know nothing that touches it for Rockies edible & medicinal plants. Its pictures make gathering the most common plants quite easy, at least for someone used to identifying flowers, trees, bushes & other plants. Though for some plants, and if you're not used to identifying plants, I'd recommend getting a few other books for confirmation, such as Guennel's Guide to Colorado Wildflowers: Mountains (Guide to Colorado Wildflowers. Vol 2. Mountains) & Kershaw's "parent" wildflower book, Lone Tree's Plants of the Rocky Mountains. If you're not sure on identification, another couple of books often help. For your area -- mine is Colorado -- you might go to your local National Forest bookstore or a State Park bookstore. If you're actually planning to use these plants medicinally (which I do), you might want something like Phyllis Balch's Prescription for Herbal Healing: An Easy-to-Use A-Z Reference to Hundreds of Common Disorders and Their Herbal Remedies, which has no pictures, but has a lot more data on uses, limitations & warnings.

I live on Pikes Peak and, during the season -- maybe April/May through October/November, I gather fresh greens, berries, bark, leaves, etc. on many, if not most days.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 26, 2004
Format: Paperback
The book has colour photographs for every plant listed, and all of the species are grouped according to family, for easy reference. Suggested preparations, identifying features and safety precautions are included for every plant in the book. There is a very important section on poisonous plants that every hiker/mountaineer should read. traditional Native medicinal uses are also listed.
I take this book everywhere I go.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Tyler on February 12, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Living in Idaho, most of these plants are native to my area. Not all but most. This is my favorite book to take with me on hikes or backpacking trips, lets me identify so many flowers and shrubs that I never knew could do things to the human body.

I highly recommend this book to anyone in the rocky area who wants to learn more about the plants in the area. It's great and easy to read, even for people with little to no plant knowledge! The bright colored pages make it SUPER easy to identify, plus the book will tell you if two plants look similar and how to differentiate the two.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By D. Loring on March 8, 2007
Format: Paperback
We've used this book on every occasion we've been either hiking and camping and that is quite a lot. We've found all sorts of edibles that we normally wouldn't have eaten.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Brandon Staton on June 5, 2008
Format: Paperback
I bought this book to replace one I had passed on to a young kid who wanted to learn more about his Rocky Mountain environment. I have owned this book for four years and found it to be the most educational book about edible and medicinal plants that are found in the Rocky Mountain region. The color illustration helps immensely. Any person who is inspiring to spend time in the Rocky Mountain back country should own this book.
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