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Edible Wild Mushrooms of North America: A Field-to-kitchen Guide Paperback – January 1, 1992


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Frequently Bought Together

Edible Wild Mushrooms of North America: A Field-to-kitchen Guide + National Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Mushrooms (National Audubon Society Field Guides) + Mushrooms Demystified
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 264 pages
  • Publisher: University of Texas Press (1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0292720807
  • ISBN-13: 978-0292720800
  • Product Dimensions: 0.6 x 7.2 x 10.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (40 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #68,778 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Some new mushroomers will find this single volume all the library they need to harvest and enjoy wild mushrooms for the table. (Mushroom the Journal)

The publication is of excellent quality and print, well edited, authoritative, and provides an excellent introduction to edible and poisonous wild mushrooms. (Mycologia)

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Customer Reviews

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Can't wait to try the recipes.
Thomas fletcher
You will not be able to identify every mushroom you find with this book but it is very useful in identifying most of the great eating mushrooms.
Joni P
This is one book we expect to use frequently.
Louise A. Crossman

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

75 of 77 people found the following review helpful By Bundita on January 6, 2004
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I bought this book many years ago as the first of what is now a fairly large collection on the subject. As the title indicates, it concentrates on the EDIBLE fungi, so the reviewer who was dissappointed because he/she could ID only one of the 13 mushrooms he/she found has unfair expectations out of the scope of this work. That said, only the most popular edibles seem to be listed here, and variants on those species are not covered in much depth. It's ok for those who just want to be able to distinguish a golden chanterelle from a jack-o-lantern, or a morel from a thimble-cap so they can safely gather some edibles. The worst thing about this book, however, is it's unfortunate recipes. Every single recipe I've tried from it completely sucks. Either the cooking method is inappropriate to that particular mushroom (turning delicate specimins to mush, for instance, or inundating absorptive ones with oil), or strong flavors from other ingredients overwhelm the sometimes subtle flavors of the mushrooms themselves. I get much better results by trusting my cooking intuition and experimenting than I do by following these recipes.
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37 of 39 people found the following review helpful By J. Hilliard on July 23, 2001
Format: Paperback
For those interested in preparing and eating the more common and easily-recognized species of edible mushrooms, this book is a must-have. In-depth species descriptions, including dangerous look a likes, make positive identifications much easier. Lush recipes (with photos) in the back of the book inspire mycophagists to get out in the woods and hunt their quarry. Buy the book -- you'll love it! Suggest using this book in conjunction with Audubon or other field guide.
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28 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Michal L. Jones on November 14, 2002
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
For a "first" book on wild mushrooms I found this one to be very good. The pictures show the top, bottom, stems, colors and different parts of each mushroom. There are "warnings" on those that are ediable, but make some people sick, and the NO-NO"s are equally shown and written about. We're just new at this, and for a "starter" book this was just the ticket.
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18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By M. Nissen on March 24, 2005
Format: Paperback
This is a concise easy to use book for people just starting to

hunt for edible mushrooms. It concentrates extensively on the edibles, and look alike poisonous. By eliminating 1000s of other mushrooms it is great for identifying the finest edibles. It makes a great companion to a more all encompassing publication. The recipes I've tried were good also.
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33 of 43 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 14, 1998
Format: Hardcover
This books is a wonderful collection of fantistic color photographs. Each recipie is a new journey into an exciting and tasty world of foods under our feet. Highly recommended to scientist and amatuer alike!
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By DougSmith on January 8, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Edible Wild Mushrooms of North America (David W. Fischer and Alan E. Bessette, University of Texas Press, Austin, 1992) is becoming a hard to find item. I bought it when it was newly published, but I needed another copy to give as a Christmas gift. The book itself is the best review of edible mushrooms you can find. Included are a lot of inedible mushrooms that you need to know about if you are going to go out and collect fungi to eat or even if you are going to buy them at a fresh market. Never eat a mushroom if you cannot positively identify it. What a disappointment that could be if you have found a wonderful looking patch in the woods or in your yard but you are in doubt. This book will give you all the information you need to be informed and make your decision. A friend of mine told me about finding some attractive white mushrooms in his lawn. I asked him if he had any idea what they were. "Oh- they're the Destroying Angel. I saw the picture in a book." Well, he didn't read far enough because it was not the time of year for Amanita virosa to be fruiting, and the trees that they grow in association with were nowhere nearby. Yes, the mushroom had some of the characteristics of an Amanita, but there were crucial differences. If he had seen those differences, he would have recognized meadow mushrooms and known that he could have made a fine meal of them. Some people avoid wild mushrooms that way. They don't want to consider the possibility of mycophagy.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By thedamnedapostle on December 18, 2011
Format: Paperback
Great pictures, great descriptions. Only covers edible species and their look-alikes; so if you want to identify other species, you will need another guide. I use this book in conjunction with "Mushrooms of Northeastern North America" by Bessette and Fischer, and rarely find a mushroom I cannot classify. Has huge margins on every page, great for field notes.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Louise A. Crossman on January 11, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A great addition to our "Mushroom Library" Any knowledge we can gain in this field is a benefit. There were some realistic recipes and a few that made us wish Spring would hurry up so we could go "shrooming" for some of the mushrooms we haven't tried yet. The photos and key to identification were excellent. We checked this on the dozen or so mushrooms we know well and everything was right on, so we feel confident that we can identify a few that we were not sure of in the past. Of course we'll check them out in our other books and with our foraging friend who is a lot more experienced than we are at identifying mushrooms. He has 60 plus years of knowledge from gathering mushrooms with his extended family in this area of the country and a vast library of well used mushroom books.

We raise Shiitake and Oyster mushrooms and freeze or dry them for later use, so that's mostly what we're using in the recipes until we can gather wild ones. While the taste and texture are not exactly the same, we can see which recipes we would want to try when we have a small amount of wild ones and don't want to waste them on a recipe we aren't sure would work for us.

This is one book we expect to use frequently.
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