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Edible Pockets for Every Meal: Dumplings, Turnovers and Pasties (Nitty Gritty Cookbook) Paperback – January 1, 1997


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Product Details

  • Series: Nitty Gritty Cookbook
  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Bristol Publishing Enterprises Inc (January 1, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1558671641
  • ISBN-13: 978-1558671645
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 0.5 x 5.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,455,411 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

If it contains flours and grains, Donna Rathmell German has probably written a book about it! She is the leading expert on bread machine baking, and the author of many books on the subject, including The Bread Machine Cookbookseries, The Pasta Machine Cookbook, The Best Pizza is Made at Home and The New Book of Waffles and Pizzelles. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

27 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Stephen Foster VINE VOICE on April 3, 2000
Format: Paperback
My copy of this unpretentious little book is rapidly getting dog-eared. If the recipes weren't so very good, my family would surely be dog-tired of pies and turnovers by now, because I can't seem to stop making them! I literally had to start decorating my productions so that we could distinguish the three or four kinds we usually have on hand.
The book has two parts, one on wrappers, and one on fillings. Wrappers are further subdivided into yeasted, pastry, and ready-made wrappers. Fillings are split into Savoury, Vegetarian Savoury, and Sweet. I have no sweet tooth whatsoever, so I can't comment on the sweet fillings, but of the fifteen or twenty savoury fillings I've made so far, there has only been one dud.
So why only four stars?
1) The section on pastry wrappers could be a little longer, with more instruction on the often-devilish details of pastry-making.
2) I like my fillings to have interesting textures. Ms. German seems to prefer puréeing everything.
3) She has a tendency to overcook fillings (astonishing comment, coming from a Brit!)
4) She has a fondness for frozen vegetables.
The last three quibbles are obviously easily rectified by adjusting the recipes to your taste.
Highlights: Spicy Asian Chicken, Chinese Orange Beef, Piroshki, and both of the empanada recipes.
Ladies and Gentlemen, start your bread machines!
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31 of 34 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 18, 2002
Format: Paperback
The strongest part of Edible Pockets is the various dough recipes. I've tried only a couple, but they worked. I did have to adapt the process to working dough with a stand-alone mixer. I didn't mind, but in a book that seems aimed at the complete novice, it's surprising that German doesn't address this popular alternative to bread machine and totally manual approaches.
My biggest complaint, though, is the filling recipes. Have you ever made tuna salad as usual for sandwiches and wondered how it would work if heated? Probably not, but German recommends this in the "tuna and cheese" filling and I was sucker enough to try it. For the record, celery just enough off crisp to be soggy is not a wonderful texture. And the cooking directions for fillings are misleading, as another reviewer has pointed out. An example is the "Cornish Pasty Filling," which was already well on its way to mush at half the hour's cooking time prescribed. In general, most fillings lack moisture and make for a mighty dry pocket.
German's directions for assembling the pockets are also at fault.
It's nice to know one can roll out the pastry to 1/8", but there are plenty of fillings that work best with a thicker-sided pocket. German does mention the possibility of letting the yeast-dough pockets rise before baking but fails to point out that the fillings must be at room temperature if this is going to happen. I also wonder why she is so keen on using pressing molds for calzones and other standard pockets. Unless you are cooking for an army, crimping with fingers seals the pockets just dandy.
When German says "If you have leftovers ... try using them as pocket fillings," she hits the nail on the head. If you have access to a toaster oven at work, her book helps provide a tasty lunch solution. Throw away the second half of the book, though, and dream up your own fillings.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By H. Grove (errantdreams) TOP 500 REVIEWER on December 16, 2007
Format: Paperback
The equipment section at the front of this cookbook has a brief bit of information on using "pocket makers" (also called turnover presses or dumpling presses), pierogi or ravioli makers, and cutting and sealing gadgets. There's a section on "simple pairings" (things you can throw into a pocket dough as a filling without needing a recipe-many leftovers work well).

There are yeast dough wrappers, pastry dough wrappers, and "ready-made" wrappers. Fillings include poultry, meat, seafood, cheese, vegetable, herb, and sweet.

Each dough section has a detailed list of instructions at the front. Then each actual dough recipe covers ingredients, oven temperature and baking time, and expected yields for different sizes of pockets. This way each recipe can fit on one small page, and a great number of recipes can fit into a relatively short space. The filling recipes are extremely simple. There's a short list of ingredients (most recipes make one to two cups of filling, which actually goes quite far) and usually a brief paragraph of instructions. Then there's a quick list of suggested wrappers for the filling and the pages you'll find them on.

The recipes in this cookbook are awfully good. What about a chicken curry filling, or a Moroccan chicken filling? How about an Italian ham filling, Asian pork filling, sausage eggplant filling, or bacon and cheese filling? There are meat pie recipes from various countries, a Chinese orange beef filling, tuna and cheese, crab and cream cheese, crab and cheddar, and ginger shrimp.

Or maybe you'd prefer herbed feta and walnut, cheese calzone, three cheese, tomato rice, spicy tomato cheese, mushroom, mushroom and cheese, broccoli cheddar, or similar cheese and vegetable fillings.
Read more ›
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Stephen Foster VINE VOICE on February 28, 2000
Format: Paperback
My copy of this unpretentious little book is rapidly getting dog-eared. If the recipes weren't so very good, my family would surely be dog-tired of pies and turnovers by now, because I can't seem to stop making them! I literally had to start decorating my productions with alphabetical pastry cutouts (made with the help of a Play-Doh lettering kit), so that we can distinguish between the three or four kinds we usually have on hand.
The book has two parts, one on wrappers, and one on fillings. Wrappers are further subdivided into yeasted, pastry, and ready-made wrappers. Fillings are split into Savoury, Vegetarian Savoury, and Sweet. I have no sweet tooth whatsoever, so I can't comment on the sweet fillings, but of the fifteen or twenty savoury fillings I've made so far, there has only been one dud.
So why only four stars?
1) The section on pastry wrappers could be a little longer, with more instruction on the often-devilish details of pastry-making.
2) I like my fillings to have interesting textures. Ms. German seems to prefer puréeing everything.
3) She has a tendency to overcook fillings (astonishing comment, coming from a Brit!)
4) She has a fondness for frozen vegetables.
The last three quibbles are obviously easily rectified by adjusting the recipes to your taste.
Highlights: Spicy Asian Chicken, Chinese Orange Beef, Piroshki, and both of the empanada recipes.
Ladies and Gentlemen, start your bread machines!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
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