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Edison in the Boardroom: How Leading Companies Realize Value from Their Intellectual Assets Hardcover – June 13, 2001


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Product Details

  • Series: Intellectual Property-General, Law, Accounting & Finance, Management, Licensing, Special Topics (Book 20)
  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Wiley; 1 edition (June 13, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0471397369
  • ISBN-13: 978-0471397366
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 6.3 x 9.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,301,099 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Everyone who manages IP for a company, a university, or a federal agency, should look at this handbook and the Web site associated with it." (The Federal Lawyer, Nov/Dec 2001)

Review

"A beacon of light for organizations trying to make intellectual property a dynamic property rather than a fixed legal asset." —Business Finance Magazine, November 2001

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 18, 2002
Format: Hardcover
Professor Thomas G. Field, Jr., Franklin Pierce Law Center
Few variables are more likely to dictate short- and long-term commercial success than a firm's ability to convert intellectual assets into intellectual property (IP). The smaller the firm, the bigger the need, and the need only grows.
Most companies are careful to avoid IP infringement and are eager to sue direct competitors who do not. Many firms also educate key employees on their roles in perfecting and protecting intangible assets. Fewer give full attention to IP and antecedents that might nevertheless be regarded as assets. For example, those who would not hesitate to monitor and sue infringing competitors may not monitor non-competitors as potential licensees.
To extract the most from intellectual assets, many factors, e.g., legal, technical marketing and sales, must be weighed. Edison in the Boardroom offers important advice to help firms take steps to meet that need. Despite its reference to "assets" in the subtitle, however, most of this book focuses more narrowly - on IP, and on patents specifically.
Davis and Harrison, said to bring "a quarter century of IP consulting accomplishments between them," document that some companies have long engaged in trying to optimize the value of their intellectual assets. The authors also assign companies to a five-level hierarchy based on a range of IP-management strategies. A goldmining metaphor is usefully advanced at one point to describe those levels as: defensive (staking claims), panning (cost control), mining (deeper profit seeking), processing (integration), and sculpting. The heart of the book consists of five chapters that discuss these levels seriatim and offers a host of useful ideas and anecdotes.
The book is generally well-structured.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Robert Morris HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on August 11, 2001
Format: Hardcover
The basic concept of this book is very intriguing: Briefly examine the life and career of Thomas Edison and then suggest direct correlations between his achievements with real-world situations in which various companies are now deriving substantial value from their intellectual capital. The authors also make skillful use of Edison's own recorded thoughts and feelings. Of special interest to me was what he had to say about the creative process. For example, "Men are just beginning to propose questions and find answers, and we may be sure that no matter what question we ask, so long as it is not against the laws of nature, a solution can be found." This what the author refer to as "The Edison Mindset." Edison apparently had almost no concern about a given experiment's "failure" which he continued to view, rather, as non-success to that stage. Too often, senior-level executives become preoccupied with results and neglect the process by which they can be achieved. Among Edison's greatest (and perhaps least appreciated) achievements was the establishment of the first research laboratory in which he and his associates would collaborate on various projects. Edison was a pioneer in recognizing the importance of assembling the best available talent and providing them with sufficient resources as well as a culture wherein those talents could be fully utilized. Davis and Harrison obviously have this point in mind when observing that "benchmarking best practices without any regard for the underlying culture of the firm can be problematic.Read more ›
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By John Cronin on July 1, 2001
Format: Hardcover
I throughly enjoyed the book, I read it in just a few hours. It is an informative text on how to make the most of your IP, especially for those companies that either have a great start by already having IP (patents) or those that want to get started developing it. This would have particular interest for those who want to start their journey in developing IP processes in their company. I have worked in this field for years and have read many books involving IP, but never has their been such a informative book. The nice thing is it is 100% up to date on what is going on and who is doing it. For instance, learn how Dow, probably the leader in the field of IP Practices, does what they do.
Davis and Harrison have taken their vast experiences and knowledge that they have obtained over the years of work with their clients and codified these experiences in a "best practices book", particularly focused on how to manage the IP you already have.
If you don't read this and you have an interest in this field, you will be missing what is likely to be the cornerstone text of the field.
John Cronin, CEO of ipCapitalGroup, Inc an IP Professional Services Company.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 26, 2001
Format: Hardcover
At last a book with both stories and practical frameworks! I found Kevin Rivette's book a nice story, but it had little substance, whereas Harrison's ICMG co-patriot Dr. Sullivan's books are rooted in the theory of what to do to manage intellectual assets, but sometimes tough to apply without the help of his company. This book is a good blend of the two, with company examples and an intuitive framework for managing intangibles. And its not too long to give to my execs to read on a plane. Good show!
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