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Editing Digital Video : The Complete Creative and Technical Guide [Paperback]

Robert M. Goodman , Patrick McGrath
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)

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Book Description

September 10, 2002 0071406352 978-0071406352 1
This title includes CD-ROM with footage you can use to practice editing! It includes: a digital way to cut video; superb solutions to edit your video; for the amateur, turn your family videos into stories; and for the professional, learn to cut your films using the latest digital video tips and tricks. Here, a pair of award-winning professionals share their insights. "Editing Digital Video" explains how to use any tool - from iMovie or Premiere to appliances like Casablanca and Screenplay or professional systems such as Avid, Discreet, Media 100 - to turn your imagination into results fast. This title enables you to quickly acquire the skills you need to: edit commercials, documentaries, feature films, and music videos; work with video, DVD, and Web-based media; and take advantage of proven techniques from the pros. Anyone from amateurs to students to professionals can learn to edit and tell compelling stories using the results-oriented approach in "Editing Digital Video". Plus, a companion CD-ROM with footage and exercises lets you practice on any system. With clear illustrations and a light touch, "Editing Digital Video" will guide you through the finer points of: navigating the desktop; basic and advanced editing; creating impact; organizing projects; keys, mattes, and layering; titles and effects; audio; digital video formats; postproduction workflow; editing terminology; keyboard shortcuts; and much, much more! With "Editing Digital Video", you'll finally unleash your creativity. Learn more in one session than you would from any user manual. This is a refreshingly realistic approach!

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Editorial Reviews

Review

A "complete creative and technical guide" for editing digital video seems like an overly ambitious concept. It is surprising how well the authors manage to accomplish it. The goal of the book, stated in the 2nd paragraph is "to teach anyone, amateurs or professionals, how to edit on any digital video editing system and achieve results." As a first primer -- not superficial but focused on the introductory basics, this book makes a very good attempt in achieving that goal. While I filled the margins with notes on what I thought was left out, or opinions I did not necessarily agree with, I was surprised at the concepts I could not stop thinking about when I finished this book. It will now have a prominent, handy place on my bookshelf -- a treatment that most professional editing books do not get. I know this will make a handy reference and will be re-read more than once.

The book comes with a CD-ROM that is compatible with most editing systems, and offers step-by-step instructions using the source material when teaching basic concepts. The first chapter deals with basic concepts and defines editing, describes the hardware and software basics, and the concept of workflow. Oddly, the concept of offlining is not mentioned in describing workflows. This chapter describes why the term "Digital Video Editing" is used throughout the book instead of "Nonlinear Editing" (a distinction which I personally do not agree with) and offers six universal principles of "digital video editing" as part of the definition.

The next chapter follows with the basics of today's digital video editing system and examines the GUI desktop design aspects. The authors do a very good job balancing the amount of content and detail for the beginner. Small things I was troubled about was that they left out a reference to SDTI connections while they included SDI and HD-SDI in their discussion on connectivity standards. They also left out pen & tablet when discussing the human interface tools, although I was pleased that they discussed the ergonomics as it related to left-handed editors. Overall, it was a complete and effective lesson.

Chapter 3, "Beginnings, Middles and Ends" is my favorite chapter. Not only does it start with teaching editing, but it makes a very good introductory effort to communicate the aesthetic concepts involved with the craft of editing. It starts appropriately with the tradition of storytelling and goes on to discuss different editing workflows (bricklayer vs. sculptor), the concept of the montage, techniques for continuity editing, Pace and Rhythm, and offers "Five Guidelines of Editing". Then the book continues with a focus on polishing the program (trimming and audio -- Chapter 4) and goes on to Chapter 5 "Styles and Workflows" -- another excellent chapter.

"Styles and Workflows" starts with the question "What's Technique?", goes on to a training component, and then analyzes different styles and workflows including Music Videos, Commercials (analyzing different types), Documentary and Nonfiction (scripted and non-scripted), and Fiction. I found myself going back and reading this chapter several times.

The next chapter focused on media asset management, including ingesting, logging and both project and bin management. This is followed by another lesson in visual grammar (compositional issues, types of shots, point of view, etc.) and goes into aspect ratios and the creation of subclips. Chapter 8 discusses clip effects, color issues, rendering, and timeline effects. Chapter 9 continues by discussing graphics, titling and compositing including the various key types and DVE effects creation issues such as perspective and keyframing.

Chapter 10, "Getting It In and Out "is the most technical chapter in the book, and the most uneven. It goes into various ways to set up a picture monitor and yet it never discusses a waveform monitor and uses the word vectorscope just once without explaining it. It does a good job with audio and defining codecs, and does an excellent job with EDLs and its evolution to the AAF metadata standard.

The last chapter, Chapter 11, is an excellent cross-reference of editing terminology as used by the various manufacturers and also offers a keyboard shortcut cross reference. This could be worth the cost of the book for freelancers that need to go from system to system and for instructors that have students asking how to do something on their home editor.

The book finishes off with a valuable set of appendixes. The first, is "Films to Watch" listing not only the films but scenes to watch for to learn editing techniques, including advanced editing, comedy editing, sound editing and documentary editing. It also lists Eddie Award nominees from 1934 to 2001. Appendix B is a list of "Resources" including magazines, books, and internet resources. (There is no mention of Bob Turner's THE CUT, so it is obviously an incomplete reference!) It ends with an extensive list of manufacturers with descriptions and contact information. Appendix C is a script for the CD-ROM exercise.

There were small points I disagreed with and some sections that were not as strong as others, but overall I was amazed at not only how much was covered in a single book, but at how valuable the information was that was provided.

With these reservations stated, I recommend this book. I can see it as a text source for video editing instructors, and for anyone that wants to get started in the craft of editing. (The Cut 2002-10-02)

From the Back Cover

Includes CD-ROM with footage you can use to practice editing!

THE DIGITAL WAY TO CUT VIDEO

Superb solutions to edit your video. For the amateur, turn your family videos into stories. For the professional, learn to cut your films using the latest digital video tips and tricks.

A pair of award-winning professionals share their insights. Editing Digital Video explains how to use any tool -- from iMovie or Premiere to appliances like Casablanca and Screenplay or professional systems such as Avid, Discreet, Media 100 -- to turn your imagination into results fast. Quickly acquire the skills you need to:
* EDIT COMMERCIALS, DOCUMENTARIES, FEATURE FILMS, AND MUSIC VIDEOS
* WORK WITH VIDEO, DVD, AND WEB-BASED MEDIA
* TAKE ADVANTAGE OF PROVEN TECHNIQUES FROM THE PROS

Anyone from amateurs to students to professionals can learn to edit and tell compelling stories using the results-oriented approach in Editing Digital Video. Plus, a companion CD-ROM with footage and exercises lets you practice on any system. With clear illustrations and a light touch, Editing Digital Video will guide you through the finer points of:
* Navigating the desktop
* Basic and advanced editing
* Creating Impact
* Organizing Projects
* Keys, mattes, and layering
* Titles and Effects
* Audio
* Digital video formats
* Postproduction Workflow
* Editing Terminology
* Keyboard Shortcuts
* And much, much more!

With Editing Digital Video, you’ll finally unleash your creativity. Learn more in one session than you would from any user manual. A refreshingly realistic approach!


Product Details

  • Series: Digital Video and Audio
  • Paperback: 361 pages
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill/TAB Electronics; 1 edition (September 10, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0071406352
  • ISBN-13: 978-0071406352
  • Product Dimensions: 0.9 x 7.3 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #169,006 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
47 of 48 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Invaluable March 2, 2003
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
Let's face it, most people doing digital video are self-taught. Sure, there are some who've been to film school or have lots of experience with film but of all the DV camera owners, they're in the minority. The result: hours and hours and hours of weddings, school plays, birthday parties and... well... tripe. This book can help turn that tripe into gold because it covers the black art of editing.
Editing is one of those subjects that seems to be hard to teach through a book and, therefore, hard to learn. The solution employed by the authors is to include a CD containing three video clips for the reader to edit. The overall process is described in the text.
There's a wealth of other good information, some quite basic, some fairly advanced - a perusal of the table of contents will be informative to you.
Pros:
* Platform and edit system neutrality
* Video clips to edit
* Tour of all the important concepts
* Simple terminology
Cons:
* No finished professional edit of the project
* More detailed info on professional techniques would be nice
Was this review helpful to you?
34 of 36 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A well-written must-have that won't disappoint! December 12, 2002
Format:Paperback
This is an amazing book that is a must-have for anyone that is in the industry, interested in being in the industry, or just plain interested in the world of digital video. Editing Digital Video by Robert M. Goodman and Patrick McGrath is an exceptionally well-written book that covers techniques in craft and theory about editing that can benefit the novice home video editor to the professional feature film editor. The authors complete the daunting task of covering all of the many different digital editing interfaces by stripping them down to the essentials. They also cover the many different kinds of formats, such as narrative, documentary, commercials, music video, etc. I found the Keyboard Shortcut Cross Reference exceptionally handy. This book also covers recording DVDs, EDL formats, and details about exporting graphics. Being an editor initially learning editing techniques by physically cutting film and graduating to digital video editing, I very much appreciated this book that respected editing as a craft and art.
The fundamentals about storytelling and editing are definitely worth reading. Some of it might be a bit too Editing 101, but surprisingly, held some gems. The "Films to Watch" chapter with films that have been recommended for different genres of editing to lists of Eddie Award Nominees and Oscar Nominees is an added bonus.
Written in a very readable and likeable prose, Editing Digital Video is an absolute joy and a must for any editing enthusiast, whether in trade or in hobby.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The essential editing book!! December 10, 2002
Format:Paperback
This is an amazing book that is a must-have for anyone that is in the industry, interested in being in the industry, or just plain interested in the world of digital video. Editing Digital Video by Robert M. Goodman and Patrick McGrath is an exceptionally well-written book that covers techniques in craft and theory about editing that can benefit the novice home video editor to the professional feature film editor. The authors complete the daunting task of covering all of the many different digital editing interfaces by stripping them down to the essentials. They also cover the many different kinds of formats, such as narrative, documentary, commercials, music video, etc. For the expert, I found the Keyboard Shortcut Cross Reference exceptionally handy. This book also covers recording DVDs, EDL formats, and details about exporting graphics. Being an editor initially learning editing techniques by physically cutting film and graduating to digital video editing, I very much appreciated this book that respected editing as a craft and art.
The fundamentals about storytelling and editing are definitely worth reading. Some of it might be a bit too Editing 101, but surprisingly, held some gems. The "Films to Watch" chapter with films that have been recommended for different genres of editing to lists of Eddie Award Nominees and Oscar Nominees is an added bonus.
Written in a very readable and likeable prose, Editing Digital Video is an absolute joy and a must for any editing enthusiast, whether in trade or in hobby.
Was this review helpful to you?
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A pro editing book to keep handy October 9, 2002
Format:Paperback
Chapter 3, "Beginnings, Middles and Ends" is my favorite chapter. Not only does it start with teaching editing, but it makes an very good introductory effort to communicate the aesthetic concepts involved with the craft of editing. It starts appropriately with the tradition of storytelling and goes on to discuss different editing workflows (bricklayer vs. sculptor), the concept of the montage, techniques for continuity editing, Pace and Rhythm, and offers "Five Guidelines of Editing".
Overall I was amazed at not only how much was covered in a single book, but at how valuable the information was that was provided.
I recommend this book. I can see it as a text source for video editing instructors, and for anyone that wants to get started in the craft of editing.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Good Start to Editing December 24, 2002
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
"Editing Digital Video" is a good overall review of editing. The book tries to touch on both the creative and the technical. It may be hard to teach the creative in these short pages, but it at least points you in the direction. Although it was in depth in teaching the basic of the basics of editing, such as "What is a shot?" it lacked when it came to describing more technical terms such as "What is 16:9?" It also gives an overview of all editing systems, nothing in depth on specific ones, such as Avid or Final Cut Pro, granted many have conformed to the same operations, it would have been nice to have subtle differences pointed out.
Overall, I think this book is a good book for beginner's and for advanced editor's that occasionally have brain freezes when working.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
My son loves it!
Published 6 days ago by Chrystopher
4.0 out of 5 stars Good Book on Principles of Editing
Although more than 10 years old, this book gives excellent advice on work flow and does not focus on the details of any particular video editing system. Read more
Published 2 months ago by Patrick C. Stevenson
5.0 out of 5 stars Everything that I expected
This is a video editors handbook. Rather you're a beginner or an expert, this book is definitely beneficial. Read more
Published 5 months ago by Ashley
1.0 out of 5 stars Old book
I didn't like this book at all. The techniques are to old, we are in a new era of digital video
Published 17 months ago by Kris
3.0 out of 5 stars might be good for somebody else
I wanted a book more 'how-to' oriented toward splicing, adding sound, captions etc., but this book is more 'artistically' oriented.
Published 19 months ago by Kim Griffith
3.0 out of 5 stars It's just okay for me.
I purchased this book thinking it would help me craft my editing skills somewhat better. I'm a bit self-taught when it comes to video editing, so it mainly shared theories and... Read more
Published on November 29, 2011 by VampireNovelFan
4.0 out of 5 stars College Textbook
The book is good if you need to self teach yourself all the terms and jargon for editing and shooting film. Read more
Published on February 7, 2010 by Jim Lundeen
2.0 out of 5 stars Poor quality printing
I bought this book because I thought it was a good starting point and aproach to video editing. But it's a little to much saying "The Complete Technical Guide". Read more
Published on October 20, 2009 by P. Cereijeiro
4.0 out of 5 stars This book good for begginers
This book offers a good review over the concepts concerned with Videography. I have a 2 years experience in Video Editing. Read more
Published on August 13, 2007 by Alberto Liévano
4.0 out of 5 stars Take your editing up a notch...
I have been using entry-level NLEs (e.g. Vegas Movie Studio, Pinnacle Studio, Magix Movie Edit Pro) for about four years. Read more
Published on August 24, 2006 by M. Veronneau
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